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14:23 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Democratising Spatial Data Access and Understanding for Planning Visualisation with GIality

This paper introduces a new digital and in-field mobile solution for landscape visual impact analysis (VIA) with in-field mobile visualisation using GIality (the convergence of 3D models, sensors including location and spatial data) to provide new and engaging, contextual and personal access to information. By taking planning data for spatial analysis off the map and into intuitive app-based mobile systems we will discuss how traditional plan-based representation is not always the best communication tool. Maps may remain a tool for experts and professionals but the future of GI representation is no longer limited by physical media. For public understanding – and the democtatisation of data –we must understand and embrace new technology trends and opportunities in consumer devices. We will explain how, using modern technology drivers including devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers, combined with geospatial positioning, spatial data and services, GIality can bring a new dimension democratisation and community engagement with planning & renewables data. Especially related to planning and renewable energy development, visual impact is one of the primary aspects in the consideration of acceptance under local and national guidance. This is most reported where the impact of wind turbines on the landscape has split political, environmental and consumer opinion. However the current mechanisms and procedures for visual impact assessment (VIA) are based on traditional printed off-site analysis which limits their context, scope and use. A new approach will be demonstrated with a case study in Scotland. The trends for mobile work and play, combined with integrated sensors and social coordination provide the availability and accessibility of tools for both professionals and citizens to democratise and personalise data. The augmentation of as-planned models and geospatial data with device location, attitude and orientation allows individual places of residence, work and play to be equally fairly, rigorously and unambiguously assessed for visual impact and create cost-effective solutions.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
24:59 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Concurrent Online Webgis: A New Way To Map Together

Imagine a map on which many people collaborate at the same time. Imagine you see the edits happening in real time and you can also see the position of your collaborators and their current view on the map. A Google Docs for maps so you will. Imagine this map in a web-browser that runs on a mobile phone. Imagine not a single bit of data has to be stored on a central server but people are all acting as nodes storing the data in their browser.... and it still works offline..... With the rise of HTML5, including websockets and indexeddb, this is now possible. We created a concurrent online webgis where an unlimited amount of people can do collaborative work on a map in real time. A combination of Openlayers, Websocket and Indexeddb makes it possible to see and update each others edits and location. When people go offline their edits are stored for later synchronisation with their peers. This makes it very useful in unreliable network conditions. The tool has already been deployed in a few test cases. In low level educational projects where students share data with their smart-phone and create a common map. Also during wildfires where officers in the field regularly update the situation for the commanders in the control room. This is just the beginning, new HTML5 capabilities like WebRTC will open up new roads in map-making. Maps will become more dynamic and social, where (map)data will be directly shared between peers. Also if you get bored you get to make a map together with everybody else in the room.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
23:38 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Doing Business With FOSS

How to make money with free and open source software ... that's the question! Often the easy answer is “by delivering services to the clients using the software”. A more nuanced answer could be: “to be open in your business model, to cooperate with other FOSS project communities and to provide a sustainable service offer with quality assurance to the clients”. Dirk Frigne, co-founder of Geosparc and spiritual father of Geomajas will share his experience with open source adepts and business people interested in starting doing business in an open and transparent way.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
26:25 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

How To Create A Geocoded Town - Monmouthpedia And Gibraltarpedia

Monmouthpedia was the first Wikipedia project to embrace a whole town—specifically, the Welsh town of Monmouth (pron.: /ˈmɒnməθ/ MON-məth; Welsh: Trefynwy). The project aimed to cover every single notable place, person, artefact, plant, animal and other things in Monmouth in as many languages as possible, but with a special focus on Welsh. This was a different scale of wikipedia-project. The project was jointly funded by Monmouthshire County Council and Wikimedia UK, Monmouthshire County Council and it included free town wide Wi-Fi for the project. ” Monmouthpedia uses QRpedia codes, a type of bar code a smartphone can read through its camera (using one of the many free QR readers available) that takes you to a Wikipedia article in your language. QR codes are extremely useful, as physical signs have no way of displaying the same amount of information and in a potentially huge number of languages. Articles have coordinates (geotags) to allow a virtual tour of the town using Wikipedia's mobile apps (or the Wikipedia layer on Google Streetview) and are available in augmented reality software including Layar. Monmouthpedia may not use standard black and white QR codes, in order to differentiate between MonmouthpediA codes and other schemes and individual's codes. There are different kinds of QR code—plaques and labels—all put up with the permission of the council and building owner: GibraltarpediA is the first Wikipedia project to aspiresto bridge two continents. Like Monmouthpedia the project aims to cover every single notable place, person, artefact, plant and animal in Gibraltar in as many languages as possible. This is a large WikiProject; it's at least three times the size of MonmouthpediA. The area of interest includes the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, the Strait of Gibraltar, the Spanish municipalities along the coast of the Bay of Gibraltar, the northernmost coast of Morocco and Ceuta. This project also uses NFC technology in addition to QR codes The authors are currently working in Gibraltar to demonstrate geotagging in practise. The project uses open street map to keep track of its progress.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
30:25 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions. Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources. Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields. The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries. The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
16:22 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Working With Spatial Databases With GeoAlchemy

GeoAlchemy helps you use spatial databases from Python. GeoAlchemy provides extensions to SQLAlchemy, the Python SQL toolkit and ORM. GeoAlchemy builds on SQLAlchemy's extreme flexibility, and can be used for different types of applications, from simple scripts to complex web applications. In this talk we will present GeoAlchemy and SQLAlchemy. We will describe when and how SQLAlchemy and GeoAlchemy can be useful. We will demonstrate the power and flexibility of the tools. We will also present the new version of GeoAlchemy, namely GeoAlchemy 2. GeoAlchemy 2 enables leveraging PostGIS' new features. For example, GeoAlchemy 2 supports PostGIS's new raster type. Finally, we will demonstrate how GeoAlchemy integrates with other well-known Python tools, such as Shapely.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
22:40 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Modelling 3D Underground Data In A Web-based 3D-Client

The geological borehole, depth profile and layer-data and some background-data such as topographical maps were setup as services, mainly in a PostGreSQL/PostGIS and GeoServer environment. Both webclients are fully client-side based applications, for the 3D-client WebGL for rendering is used and all data is delivered via standarized services. For the 3D-data the X3D format is used, which is not an official OGC standard yet but delivers phantastic possibilities for 3D-modelling of data in a webbased environment. The talk will focus on some of the high-end announced requirements, especially to the 3D-webclient such as gazetteers, FeatureInfo or dynamic load of services such as WMS or WFS. A special task is the delivering of borehole data as BoreholeML, for which the GeoServer app-schema extension was used. From a technical point of view especially the development of a GeoExt-like library which connects X3dom and ExtJs 4.x is an interesting part. With this solution, elements such as gazetteers and presentation-masks for requested attribute data could be used in both 2D- and 3D-client. At the end some live impressions of the application will be shown.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
22:01 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Past, Present, & Future of MapProxy

More than three years ago MapProxy started as a small tile cache with the ability to serve regular WMS clients. MapProxy grew from that to a powerful and flexible proxy for maps. Features like the security API, the ability to reproject tiles, support for coverages from Shapefiles or PostGIS and the various tools are just a few things that make MapProxy to stand out. MapProxy is used in countless projects -- by federal or state agencies and institutions, by universities, students and hobbyists, by small, national and international companies -- all around the world. It is used to combine multiple WMS services to one, make WMS servers available in tiled clients or to restict access to georaphic boundaries. This presentation will show you the most important features that were added to MapProxy in the last years. All features will be explained with practical use cases. Topics: - Cascading WMS: combine multiple heterogeneous WMS services to one, with coverages and unified FeatureInfo - Tiling: create Google Maps/OpenStreetMap compatible tile services from WMS services that do not support the web mercator projection - Tiling: reproject tiles from web mercator to a local projection - Security: give users access to single layers, restricted to user-dependent polygons - Render server: directly integrate MapServer or Mapnik into MapProxy - Tools: calculate scales, estimate the number of tiles, read capabilities, re-seed areas, ... This presentation will also be about the future of MapProxy and the road to version 2.0.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
16:51 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

ODVIS.AT - Visualization Of Austrian Open Government Data

ODVIS-AT is a project funded by the Internet Foundation Austria and Salzburg University of Applied Science. The goal is to display open data (demographic, open government data) in a quick and easy way to end users. In 2011 the Austrian cities Linz and Vienna launched two Open Government Data services where information was published in textform (csv, pdf, json, etc.), other public authorities joined soon (find a current list at data.gov.at). In an attempt to make this data visible we started the development of a visualization service in 2013 where published data is linked to geodata and the result is put on a map. The project consists of an internet portal (odvis.at) and an api to query the data and allow personalization and combination of information. At the moment the project is still in development phase but scheduled to be finished in September 2013. The project adresses a public audience as well as researchers, journalists, students and developers. Data can be accessed from a central service that provides a snapshot of currently available government data. On thehe backend the visualisation is rendered as a graphic layer to be used with Open Street Map, using Mapnik and a postGIS module. Rendering on demand allows filtering, combination of data sets, mathematical computation (via the api) and hence the personalisation of the information display. In the presentation at FOSS4G we would like to show the project status (finished version should be ready) and experiences with the project.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
24:32 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Getting The Best Performance For GeoJSON Map Visualizations: PostGIS Vs CouchDB Backend

In order to deliver rich user experience to user, features (attribute data and geometries) have to be sent to the client for mouse-over visual effects, synchronization between charts, tables and maps, and on-the-fly classifications. GeoJSON is one of the most popular encodings for the transfer of features for client-side map visualization. The performance of client visualizations depends on a number of factors: message size, client memory allocation, bandwidth, and the speed of the database back-end amongst the main ones. Large GeoJSON-encoded datasets can substantially slow down loading and stylization times, and also crash the browser when too many geometries are requested. A combination of techniques can be used to reduce the size of the data (polygon generalization, compression, etc). The choice of an open-source DBMS for geo-spatial applications used to be easy: PostGIS is powerful, well-supported, robust and fast RDBMS ? On the other hand, unstructured data, such as (Geo)JSON, may be better served by document-oriented DBMS such as Apache CouchDB. The performance of PostGIS and CouchDB in producing GeoJSON polygons with different combination of factors that are known to affect performance was tested: compression of GeoJSON (zip) to reduce transmission times, different levels of geometry generalization (reducing the number of vertices in transferred geometries), precision reduction (the reduction of numbers of decimal digits encoding coordinates), and the use of a topological JSON encoding of geometries (TopoJSON) to avoid redundancy of edges transferred. We present the results of a benchmark exercise testing the performance of an OpenLayers interface backed by a persistence layer implemented using PostGIS and CouchD. Test data were collected using an automated test application based on Selenium, which allowed to gather repeated observations for every combination of factors and build statistical models of performance. These statistical models help to pick the best combination of techniques and DBMS, and to gauge the relative contribution of every technique to the overall performance.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
16:33 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

The Architecture Of Mobile Traffic Map Service

MOLIT(Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, and Transport) has established NTIC(National Transport Information Center) for effective management of various kinds of transportations in South Korea and released several services that people can use. Gaia3D Inc., has involved in one part of mobile service which displays traffic status on roads, streets, and highways up on geographical map, making people easily check the status of traffc wherever they’re heading. Gaia3D Inc., will introduce not only the experience of implementing mobile traffic map service (iPhone App, Android App, and Mobile Web Client) showing traffic on roads, streets, and highways at NTIC using Squid Proxy Server, GeoServer, and SQL Server but also advanced architecture coming up in 2014. NTIC system collects all kinds of real time traffic data of all highways, routes, streets, and roads in South Korea and divides those collected traffic data into three colors in green, yellow, and red by speed. These colorized traffic data are mashed up with map data to service on mobile devices. Servers carry out tiling traffic map in every 5 minutes and clients receive and display those tiled data. This system aimed at tolerating peak times of two major holiday seasons in South Korea - Chuseok(Korean Thanksgiving day) and Seolnal(Lunatic New Year’s day) when almost 15 million people per day travel at the peakest dat and about 8 million vehicels are poured out to roads, streets, and highways, so the system should be designed to safely handle over 100,000 concurrent connections. The whole system is consisted of two Cache Servers with Squid Proxy, six Map Server with GeoServer, and three Database Server with SQL Server. Real time traffic information and road lines are managed in SQL Server and provided to GeoServer. Traffic map tiles are produced in GeoServer and are passed to Cache Server. The client is designed to request tiles via interface of WMTS(Web Map Tile Service) protocol with Time Tag. The very initail architecture designed in 2012 somehow managed to endure traffic loads at peak times, but had some problems, which was quite disappointing and unexpected results. In order to improve the system, we’ve mainly focused on the enhancement of scalability. Also, we’ve newly redesigned the system into seperating tile producing servers and managing static contents using NGINX web server.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
32:58 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

FOSS4G 2013 Keynote

  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
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