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50:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

VivaCity Smart City Platform

Many big vendors are exploring the smart city concept explaining that the smart city is a city aware of the things happening in the infrastructures. Thus the vendors are pushing for a Smart Grid, Smart Metering, Smart Sensors and Smart Whatsoever. This makes the city look like a sick patient, being monitored in many ways with histograms, gauges and panels for the information to be read. In our opinion this is the most unnatural way to interact with city information. Historically the most used way to interact with citizen oriented information is the map. Even today, with the always more precise GIS tools, the map can be an important part of a city information management tool. The VivaCity Project is a platform for the data-driven smart city. The core of the platform consists of a map- based view of the city itself, with all the possible cartographic open data made available by the governance. Beyond that, various apps can contribute in a smart manner through a set of plugins and entry-points for various views of the city, enabling a deep and complex interaction with the city itself. This system is self-sustaining, considering that the city already contains its monitors, which are the citizens. They just need two sets of tools: a visualization tool enabling the citizens to understand what is being done at a given time, and a tool to express opinions, problems and proposals to the governance. Considering that an overly generic tool loses its meaning because it has no real target, the interaction with the governance is delegated to function-specific or target-specific apps sharing a common API. This way both governance and citizen gain benefits, having both sides creating new data all the time and interconnecting information from the city and its inhabitants: governance has the ability make decisions based on real-time citizen-driven data, while citizens have the opportunity to create new services using the provided data. Figure 1 - Part of the VivaCity Smart City Interface For instance, the APIs offered to external apps are aimed to the following areas of interest: Politics, political decisions Maintenance • • • • • • • • • Security City Info, Touristic, Cultural information Management, urbanistic information Urban events, Urban Acupuncture, social analysis Emergency Management, Emergency information aggregation from the many sources available Economic, Managerial information Environmental, Energy usage information The data shown in the interface is the sum and interpretation of the data provided by the local governments through open data, or applications created by third parties like OpenMunicipio in Italy, the OpenSpending platform by OKFN or even simply mash-ups with complex datasources, like the USGS earthquake map, or the various regional APIs for simple services or any other app enabling the citizen to participate actively to the activity of his government. Using the platform in different cities enables a normalization of the services offered by the cities, and the direct comparison and interconnection of cities through a distributed API supporting the governance to empower policies and improve citizens’ lifes.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
20:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

OpenLayers 3 - How To Successfully Run A Crowdfunding Campaign For An OSS Project

The impressive list of OSGeo Projects [1] show the necessity to develop OpenSource software. Behind all lines of code, there is the work of one developer. And, in our capitalist world, work means money. This presentation will underline the challenges of the crowdfunding effort organized for the development of the next major release of OpenLayers 3. OpenLayers is one of the most famous OSGeo library and is widely used for the development of web mapping applications. Its development started in 2007. In 2012, it was clear for the developers that the current release was at the end of its life. The emergence of new technologies implied to create a complete new libraries based on these new technologies. As usual in the OpenSource world, some developers started this work in the middle of 2012. Since a complete rewrite was required, it appeared clearly that the work needed to obtain a library that would allow the migration to the new release was huge. It was estimated to 2’500 hours of work. At this time, swisstopo planned a migration of its web mapping applications. swisstopo decided to use the future release of OpenLayers, which was only a very first prototype. In order to benefit of the advantages of OpenSource developments made by a community, it was not possible for swisstopo to simply mandate a company for the development of this library. The commitment of the OpenLayers community and its committers/developers was needed. So, in order to speed up the development process, swisstopo decided to invest a substantial amount of money and to organize a crowdfunding effort together with companies active in the OpenLayers development scene. Several financement channels were used: micro fundings from individuals and more important fundings from companies and administrations. This presentation will describe the main problems and challenges faced during this crowdfunding effort and how they have been solved. Here is a list of these problems and challenges: - Some key actors had to be convinced to donate in order to convince others to follow the movement. It is important that one or two big players make the first donations. And, since the money is managed by the higher manager, a lot of energy has been put in explaining how an OpenSource community works. The OpenSource development model is still not very well known and the higher management often think that a normal contract with one company is the best way to develop softwares. - The general objective was to be clear and strong enough in order to convince individuals, companies or administrations to invest on something that didn’t exist. - The financial capacities of individuals, companies or administrations are not the same. But all are part of the OpenLayers community. It was important to be able to handle donations of some dollars to some thousand of dollars. - OpenLayers is an OpenSource community, but is not a legal entity. It’s therefore not possible to make a contract with OpenLayers. In order to solve that, the main companies of the OpenLayers development scene decided to create an association in order to simplify the administrative aspects. - The commitments and the resources of the OpenLayers committers was needed in order to ensure that the library could be developed in a short time frame and with the necessary level of quality. - A worldwide communication concept has to be put in place in order to reach all potential crowdfunders. And this only with a few persons working partially on this project. - An organization had to be put in place in order to coordinate the work of persons located all around the world. But at the end, the result is here: more than 350’000 USD have been found and the development of OpenLayers 3 is a reality. And everyone can now benefit of a modern, performant and 2D/3D web mapping library, thanks to all crowdfunders and developers !!!
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
25:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

The Right Approach: How Toscana Is Migrating To GFOSS

The Tuscany Regional Administration had a rather usual proprietary GIS infrastructure (ArcIMS, Oracle, ArcGIS). They started migrating to Open Source GIS with an integrated approach, both on the sever side (PostGIS, MapServer, Geonetworks) and on the client side (Quantum GIS, GRASS), providing also training to hundreds of their technicians. What makes this experience particularly interesting is the fact that they worked form the onset in very close contact with the community, requiring that the code developed for them was generalized, and pushed to main source code. This seemed more cumbersome at first, having to coordinate with several other developers, and not having functions closely fit to their specific needs, but the superiority of this approach become quickly evident, as several functions were further improved and maintained by third parties. Among the most notable achievements were much improved topology support in PostGIS, SLD support in QGIS, and much more. We advise other administrations and enterprises to avoid the temptation of working in isolation, and simply using FOSS4G, maybe tailoring it locally, without contributing back, as this approach is short-lived, and less successful in the long term.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
25:06 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

The Met Office Open Data Journey

In November 2011, the UK Met Office launched DataPoint: an Application Programming Interface (API) for the release of its Open Data, in support of the Government’s desire for increased transparency and economic growth. Starting with just a handful of users, the service has grown in data, functionality and usage. This year the we are making further developments, responding to user feedback and ensuring INSPIRE compliance. This presentation will describe the journey so far and a forecast for the future.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
20:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

Implementation Of Standard Web Services For GOCE Data Exploitation

The European Space Agency (ESA) with the launch of the GOCE satellite in 2009 made it possible to study the Earth's gravitational field and estimate the geoid with unprecedented accuracy and resolution on a global scale. In the framework of the GOCE mission a group of experts from Politecnico di Milano, led by Professor Fernando Sansò, is also involved in order to collect, process and distribute data. Access to GOCE data, through common procedures and standard, can bring significant improvement in many fields of Earth sciences: for this reason it was decided to distribute the data using standard web services as specified by OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium). In this work first results of the development of a WPS (Web Processing Service) for spatio-temporal exploration and exploitation of GOCE and GEMMA (GOCE Exploitation for Moho Modeling and Applications) data is presented. The download query can be made for both global data and local data; in the latter case data can be dynamically interpolated from the WPS on the area and at the resolution defined by the user, or evaluated in correspondence of a set of sparse points provided by user. The GOCE service is implemented with free and open source software, GRASS GIS and pyWPS for WPS service and OpenLayers for the web interface. Furthermore the development of WMS and WCS services is on going; a WFS service, built using MapServer and to be used for the data distribution, will be added soon to improve the ASCII Grid and GeoTIFF formats that are currently available and also a new interpolation algorit based on spherical harmonics will be added too. The service is continuously updated from the point of view of the available data, the calculation procedures and data distribution.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
26:25 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

How To Create A Geocoded Town - Monmouthpedia And Gibraltarpedia

Monmouthpedia was the first Wikipedia project to embrace a whole town—specifically, the Welsh town of Monmouth (pron.: /ˈmɒnməθ/ MON-məth; Welsh: Trefynwy). The project aimed to cover every single notable place, person, artefact, plant, animal and other things in Monmouth in as many languages as possible, but with a special focus on Welsh. This was a different scale of wikipedia-project. The project was jointly funded by Monmouthshire County Council and Wikimedia UK, Monmouthshire County Council and it included free town wide Wi-Fi for the project. ” Monmouthpedia uses QRpedia codes, a type of bar code a smartphone can read through its camera (using one of the many free QR readers available) that takes you to a Wikipedia article in your language. QR codes are extremely useful, as physical signs have no way of displaying the same amount of information and in a potentially huge number of languages. Articles have coordinates (geotags) to allow a virtual tour of the town using Wikipedia's mobile apps (or the Wikipedia layer on Google Streetview) and are available in augmented reality software including Layar. Monmouthpedia may not use standard black and white QR codes, in order to differentiate between MonmouthpediA codes and other schemes and individual's codes. There are different kinds of QR code—plaques and labels—all put up with the permission of the council and building owner: GibraltarpediA is the first Wikipedia project to aspiresto bridge two continents. Like Monmouthpedia the project aims to cover every single notable place, person, artefact, plant and animal in Gibraltar in as many languages as possible. This is a large WikiProject; it's at least three times the size of MonmouthpediA. The area of interest includes the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar, the Strait of Gibraltar, the Spanish municipalities along the coast of the Bay of Gibraltar, the northernmost coast of Morocco and Ceuta. This project also uses NFC technology in addition to QR codes The authors are currently working in Gibraltar to demonstrate geotagging in practise. The project uses open street map to keep track of its progress.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

Open Geospatial Data And Services Publication On The Cloud: The INGEOCLOUDS Open Source Approach

The cloud can be used as an infrastructure, as a platform or as a (desktop) software replacement according to the three different paradigms that it supports (IaaS, PaaS and SaaS). On the other hand at the moment more and more applications are using the cloud as their backend since it promises (unlimited) scalability and elasticity in terms of storage and computing power. In the open source geospatial world a lot of effort has been invested in developing excellent software that can be used to store, manage, visualize and publish on the web geospatial data and services. But when it comes to the cloud those offerings are not always readily available since the software, we all build, does not scale in a way that can take advantage of the cloud. In that respect we worked towards providing scalability and elasticity capabilities for the storage, querying and visualization of geospatial data based on existing open source solutions like the Mapserver, PostGIS, Apache and so on. We also worked on the lower part of the software stack so that we can build an elastic file system for storing geospatial data. So we are in the process of offering a fully open source solution that can take advantage of the cloud and its properties. Moreover we have coupled this solution with support for publishing anyone’s geospatial data as Linked Open Data so that they can be readily combined with other data on the web. In that respect we are using an open source SPARQL endpoint (Virtuoso) that allows us to store geospatially enabled information given that a suitable conceptual model will be provided described in RDF. Thus we allow for seamless integration of published data on the semantic web and we provide the necessary services for integrating this kind of offering in other applications in the future. Additionally we identified an emerging need to allow end users to publish their own data and create dynamically their own customized services on the cloud. Thus we exploit cloud’s “unlimited” storage capabilities to allow end users to publish their own data (as long as it is cost effective, too), combine them with existing data and create their own WMS/WFS customized services and publish them on the web. This has a great value-added for the users since they can actually publish their own maps. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of our technical solution by building and offering a set of advanced geophysical services through the platform. These services include a service for creating shakemaps (maps the visualize the effects caused by an earthquake to the environment), predicting landslides (providing maps assessing the possibility of landslides) and handling pollution information in ground waters. In conclusion, we offer an open source software stack that is based on existing open source software and extends it as needed in order to take to the most possible advantage of the properties of the cloud. We have tried to keep the software agnostic for the specific cloud and its capabilities. The work is carried out within the INGEOCLOUDS FP7 Project, co-funded by the EU, and with the participation of companies (AKKA technologies, France), research centers (CNR, Italy and FORTH, Greece) and data providers like geological surveys (GEUS, Denmark; GEO-ZS, Slovenia; BRGM, France and EKBAA, Greece) and earthquake research institutes (EPPO, Greece).
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
26:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

Web Processing Services Using OS OpenData

In April 2010, Ordnance Survey made a number of their national mapping products freely available under the OS OpenData initiative. Vector and raster datasets at varying scales were released under a very permissive license which allows users to freely create derivative works, even for commercial purposes. Lutra Consulting released a WebGIS application to demonstrate the value and potential of combining OS OpenData, OGC services & standards and open source GIS software. The WebGIS application, Catchment Finder, uses the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) to provide a simple method for users to generate hydrological catchments (or watersheds) for any point in the UK. Catchment delineation is based on the OpenData Landform PANORAMA dataset, a 50 metre resolution digital terrain model (DTM). Catchment Finder was developed using the following FOSS components: OpenLayers and Ext JS for all user-facing functionality. MapServer and TileCache to serve background mapping and processed results. GRASS GIS for server-side catchment delineation process. PyWPS to provide a mechanism for interaction between the browser and GIS processing taking place on the server. GRASS GIS sits at the core of Catchment Finder. National slope and aspect raster datasets were pre-calculated as inputs for the watershed analysis module in order to optimise calculation times. A WPS process was developed in python (using PyWPS and GRASS’ python bindings). The process chains together a number of GRASS commands in order to generate a vector layer representing the catchment outline which is then displayed in the web client via GML or optionally downloaded as a Shapefile. PyWPS (based on python) was chosen in preference to alternative WPS server implementations due to the typical flexibility and efficiency offered by python (a high-level programming language). Implementing specific GIS processing tasks as WebGIS applications simplifies the end-user’s tasks and therefore opens up GIS processes to non-technical people. Storing datasets and carrying out processing centrally helps remove the burden of managing large/national datasets. Any updates to underlying datasets can be carried out centrally with minimal impact. As Catchment Finder implements the OGC WPS standard, it is also possible for the service to be utilised by desktop GIS applications. At present, due to the low resolution of the underlying DTM, it is only possible to generate watersheds for larger watercourses.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
20:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

Water Quality Forecast And Information System Built With FLOSS Software

Water quality is a major problem nowadays around the world. CLEANWATER system combine various information and complex data in order to evaluate the present level of nutrient pollution in vulnerable areas, as well as to assess the cost-efficiency of the measures that could be applied. Through a simple and intuitive web interface, CLEANWATER offers the decision makers a spatial aware tool to (1) create scenarios related to the human activities and climate changes, (2) send those scenarios to numerical models to model future evolution of water quality and (3) view, query and perform spatial analysis of the simulation results. The system was implemented in a test river basin (Barlad River Basin in Eastern part of Romanian) and started to contribute to the development of a modern water management system, according to EU legislation (e.g. Water Framework Directive, Nitrates Directive). The future plan is to replicate the system at national and international level. The system is build entirely with standard compliant free and open source software applications like OpenLayers, ExtJS, PostGIS, GeoServer and GDAL.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
29:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

3D Web Services And Models For The Web: Where Do We Stand?

In the past years, numerous open source projects have started to display 3D globes and 3D data on the web. Standardizing web services, data format and representation models is, therefore, a very hot topic. There are in particular ongoing efforts on the OGC side as well as on the W3C side. The OGC has released a draft candidate for a 3D web service W3DS, the ISO X3D standard proposes an XML-based file format for representing 3D computer graphics and the W3C is considering adding X3D rendering into HTML5. Other projects implement their own web services and formats. On the implementation side, Geoserver supports W3DS and X3D, the X3DOM library prototypes a possible implementation of X3D HTML5 integration and last but not least, browsers with WebGL support are fully able to handle the representation of 3D data on the client side. The talk is going to detail the mentioned elements, show demonstrations of existing implementations and try to suggest a possible path into the 3D web for the FOSS4G community.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
23:58 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

Cartaro - The Geospatial CMS

Cartaro is a new web mapping platform that makes the power of some of the best open source geospatial components available in a content management system (CMS). Cartaro allows to set-up and run small websites or complex web applications with maps and geodata. It is also suitable for geoportals and spatial data infrastructures whenever there is the need to get everything up and running without much individual programming. The geospatial software stack used in Cartaro consists of PostGIS, GeoServer, GeoWebCache and OpenLayers. The whole stack is managed from within the CMS Drupal. The geospatial components bring professional aspects of geodata management into the CMS. This is namely the ability to persist data as true geometries, thus allowing for complex and fast queries and analyses. It does also mean supporting a whole range of data formats and the most relevant OGC standards. For the latter Cartaro can extend the handling of user roles and permissions, which already exists in Drupal, to define fully granular read and write permissions for the web services, too. In the presentation we will first explain our basic motivation behind Cartaro: that is bringing geospatial functionality to the huge community of CMS developers and users. This community, which is of course much larger than the classical FOSS4G community, has a great potential to make more and better use of geodata than it was possible with most existing tools. We will then demonstrate how far the integration with the CMS reaches and present the Drupal user interface that allows to configure most features of Cartaro. We will show how to create, edit and map geospatial content with Cartaro and we will demonstrate the publication of this content as an OGC web service. We will also go into some details concerning the architecture of Cartaro and explain how we tackled specific problems. A glimpse of the some use cases will demonstrate the real potential of Cartaro. It will also show how the focus and functionality of a Cartaro based application can be extended with the installation of any of the Drupal modules that exist for almost every task one could imagine. The presentation will close with the future perspectives for Cartaro. From a technical point of view this includes the roadmap for the next months. But it also includes a discussion of our ideas about Cartaro's role as self-supporting bridge between the geo and not-so-geo world of open source software.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
14:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Englisch 2013

Bytecode Unification Of Geospatial Computable Models

Geospatial modelling revolves around the structures of data and the semantics of these structures. This is enough in simple cases, but becomes insufficient when the best structure and semantics is hard to find or the solution is too heterogeneous to fix and reuse. Field-based and objects-based geospatial models often share common GIS data structures interchangeably, but their all possible meanings are too many to define in an immutable manner. Less studied approach to geospatial modeling is using mutable structural properties and their semantic interpretation. This work shows that the functional aspect of geospatial models is just as important as the structural and semantic aspects. It also shows that semantic and even structural properties may change when functionality is integral part of the data model, and not exclusively separated at software implementation level. The paper uses this modelling paradigm to address the divide caused by field-based and object-based data models, and other challenges regarding synergy of geospatial systems that need to use both types of data models.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Sprache: Englisch
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