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28:47 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

GIS Is Not Dead, It's Coming For You And It's Been Drinking JavaScript

This talk will discuss several super kick-ass ways that JavaScript and the web have re-shaped GIS and are changing how we visualize, analyze and share geospatial data with each other and the world. GIS is dead? No, it’s not, and it’s coming to find you and spatially kick your ass with a big bag of JavaScript. The world changes fast (hello, Internet). Yet, our industry (map making in one form or another) is stuck, and has generally shown itself to be slow to react to new ideas and paradigms that grow rapidly in other spaces. But there is still hope! GIS is coming back, and it’s being re-tooled with lots of shiny new software and geo-weapons. It’s going to make an assault on all of our previous notions of its old self. Of course this new and shiny GIS resembles its former self in many ways, it's also full many new ideas about how we experience maps and data on the web. As we witness a massive resurgence in JavaScript (hello D3 & node.js), and more emphasis placed on the web in general, we see that there are actually still large holes that should be filled the geo-spatial stack. New waves of JavaScript developers have, and will continue to fill these gaps. This talk will discuss several super kick-ass ways that JavaScript and the web have re-shaped GIS and are changing how we visualize, analyze and share geospatial data with each other and the world.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
20:27 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Water Quality Forecast And Information System Built With FLOSS Software

Water quality is a major problem nowadays around the world. CLEANWATER system combine various information and complex data in order to evaluate the present level of nutrient pollution in vulnerable areas, as well as to assess the cost-efficiency of the measures that could be applied. Through a simple and intuitive web interface, CLEANWATER offers the decision makers a spatial aware tool to (1) create scenarios related to the human activities and climate changes, (2) send those scenarios to numerical models to model future evolution of water quality and (3) view, query and perform spatial analysis of the simulation results. The system was implemented in a test river basin (Barlad River Basin in Eastern part of Romanian) and started to contribute to the development of a modern water management system, according to EU legislation (e.g. Water Framework Directive, Nitrates Directive). The future plan is to replicate the system at national and international level. The system is build entirely with standard compliant free and open source software applications like OpenLayers, ExtJS, PostGIS, GeoServer and GDAL.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
26:53 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Taming Rich GML With stETL, A Lightweight Python Framework For Geospatial ETL

Data conversion combined with model and coordinate transformation from a source to a target datastore (files, databases) is a recurring task in almost every geospatial project. This proces is often refered to as ETL (Extract Transform Load). Source and/or target geo-data formats are increasingly encoded as GML (Geography Markup Language), either as flat records, so called Simple Features, but more and more using domain-specific, object oriented OGC/ISO GML Application Schema's. GML Application Schema's are for example heavily used within the INSPIRE Data Harmonization effort in Europe. Many National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies (NMCAs) use GML-encoded datasets as their bulk format for download and exchange and via Web Feature Services (WFSs).
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
22:49 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Bulk Interpolation Using the R Environment

The paper explains the development and application of a script for bulk assessment and interpolation of data in the R scripting language. In practice it is often required to analyze a large amount of spatial data from multiple periods of time. First, for familiarization with the data before their processing and second, in the process of space-time analysis in the course of the research. For majority of analyzed quantities it is required to find out, if the analyzed data are changing in space, how the data change in time, whether there are errors in the processed data etc.. An optimal solution of this problem is using the R scripting language. R comes with many interpolation methods (kriging, IDW, …), possibility to use virtually any format of input data from text, csv, xls or other file formats and provides a large abundance of optional picture, plot and graphical outputs. It is also possible to generate picture and text plots for every in-situ observation location of the examined quantity, do different statistical comparison and other applications. In short time it is possible to create a simple application that after minor modification can be employed for dealing with another bulk interpolation task. Thanks to this, after one exemplary application script has been created, it is possible to efficiently create and run additional modifications of the task, wheras other solution approaches (such as using desktop GIS programs) usually require a repetition of the same steps – setting of color ramp and color interval breaks, creating output map layouts, adding lists of extra data layers, transformations of shapefiles to identical coordinate systems and additional processing – for example statistical testing, creation of tables or creation of more plots that show a complete picture of the quantities' behavior. In our contribution, it is clearly demonstrated how the work with GIS data can be easily automated by using the R scripting language.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
32:58 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

FOSS4G 2013 Keynote

  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
25:30 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

GraphGIS, Bringing Spatial Functionalities To NoSQL Graph Databases

Driven by the major players in of the Web like Google, Facebook, Twitter, NoSQL databases quickly gained real legitimacy in handling important data volumetry. With a first concept of key-value, NoSQL databases have quickly evolve to meet a recurring relationships between entities or documents. Graph / document paradigm provides flexibility that facilitates the representation of the real world. Beyond the representation of information of social networks, this data model fits very well to the problem of Geo Information, its variety of data models and the interconnections between them. The emergence of cloud computing and the needs driven by the Semantic Web have led publishers of geospatial solutions to consider other ways than those currently used to store and process GIS information. It is in this perspective that Geomatys has developed GraphGIS, a spatial cartridge for OrientDB, the Graph oriented NoSQL database. This solution provides support of geographic Vector, Raster and Sensor data, in multiple dimensions and their associated metadata.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
50:05 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

VivaCity Smart City Platform

Many big vendors are exploring the smart city concept explaining that the smart city is a city aware of the things happening in the infrastructures. Thus the vendors are pushing for a Smart Grid, Smart Metering, Smart Sensors and Smart Whatsoever. This makes the city look like a sick patient, being monitored in many ways with histograms, gauges and panels for the information to be read. In our opinion this is the most unnatural way to interact with city information. Historically the most used way to interact with citizen oriented information is the map. Even today, with the always more precise GIS tools, the map can be an important part of a city information management tool. The VivaCity Project is a platform for the data-driven smart city. The core of the platform consists of a map- based view of the city itself, with all the possible cartographic open data made available by the governance. Beyond that, various apps can contribute in a smart manner through a set of plugins and entry-points for various views of the city, enabling a deep and complex interaction with the city itself. This system is self-sustaining, considering that the city already contains its monitors, which are the citizens. They just need two sets of tools: a visualization tool enabling the citizens to understand what is being done at a given time, and a tool to express opinions, problems and proposals to the governance. Considering that an overly generic tool loses its meaning because it has no real target, the interaction with the governance is delegated to function-specific or target-specific apps sharing a common API. This way both governance and citizen gain benefits, having both sides creating new data all the time and interconnecting information from the city and its inhabitants: governance has the ability make decisions based on real-time citizen-driven data, while citizens have the opportunity to create new services using the provided data. Figure 1 - Part of the VivaCity Smart City Interface For instance, the APIs offered to external apps are aimed to the following areas of interest: Politics, political decisions Maintenance • • • • • • • • • Security City Info, Touristic, Cultural information Management, urbanistic information Urban events, Urban Acupuncture, social analysis Emergency Management, Emergency information aggregation from the many sources available Economic, Managerial information Environmental, Energy usage information The data shown in the interface is the sum and interpretation of the data provided by the local governments through open data, or applications created by third parties like OpenMunicipio in Italy, the OpenSpending platform by OKFN or even simply mash-ups with complex datasources, like the USGS earthquake map, or the various regional APIs for simple services or any other app enabling the citizen to participate actively to the activity of his government. Using the platform in different cities enables a normalization of the services offered by the cities, and the direct comparison and interconnection of cities through a distributed API supporting the governance to empower policies and improve citizens’ lifes.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
24:57 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Boost.Geometry, Introduction And Examples

The first part of the presentation gives an accessible introduction to Boost Geometry. The second part focuses on some algorithms in detail. Boost.Geometry is a generic library written in C++ providing concepts, geometry types and algorithms developed for solving problems in computational geometry. Boost.Geometry is using modern and portable C++ generic programming techniques and is built upon the foundation of the C++ Standard Library and Boost C++ Libraries. Boost.Geometry follows the OGC Simple Features standard. The Boost Geometry library kernel is designed as agnostic with respect to dimensions, coordinate systems, and types, which makes it generally applicable. A set of geometry models is delivered already by Boost Geometry. This set can be complemented through adaptation of user-defined geometry types, following the concepts defined by Boost Geometry. Boost.Geometry is developed since 2008 by Barend Gehrels and Bruno Lalande, and Mateusz Loskot. The library is peer reviewed by the Boost Community, and accepted into the well-known Boost collection in November 2009. Since 2011 it is released as a standard part of Boost, and immediately available for the majority of C++ programmers. The library is licensed under the (non restrictive) Boost Software License. A Spatial Index, developed by Adam Wulkiewicz, will be released as a standard part of the library in the next release of Boost. The Boost.Geometry library can, because it is a concept based library, following OGC Simple Features, easily be fit into for example Spatial Databases or existing projects using (probably legacy) Object Models. The presentation is dedicated to developers who are interested in receiving practical overview to the Boost Geometry library.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
09:42 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

GeoCouch: An N-dimensional Index For Apache CouchDB And Couchbase

Databases that support spatial queries are often limited to three dimensions, but the requirements increase. You might want to query in more dimensions, for time ranges or other attributes like trajectories. Documents are represented as JSON. The values that will be stored in the index can be extracted from anywhere within such a JSON document. Even conversions like reprojections are possible. Apache CouchDB and Couchbase are document databases, hence belong to the non-relational space which is also known as “NoSQL”. One of the strengths of Apache CouchDB is the (multi-master) replication. You can keep the data from several different instances easily in sync, even if you change the data on different instances. The replication isn't limited to Apache CouchDB, but it's a whole ecosystem. It's even possible to sync with your web browser and store it in its offline storage. This way the user can access the data offline, without the need to be always connected to the server. In contrast Couchbase has its strong point in working at scale. The data gets automatically sharded across machines. Adding and removing servers at a later stage can be performed through a simple web interface. If a server goes down the system can still work without any interruptions. GeoCouch, Apache CouchDB and Couchbase are open source and licensed under the Apache License 2.0.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
28:57 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Building Catastrophe Models With Open Data And Open Software

A catastrophe model is a tool/technique which estimates the potential loss of property and life following a major catastrophic event. Different types of events or perils are modelled including; windstorm, earthquake, flood, and storm surge. ELEMENTS is the in-house catastrophe modelling software which is developed by Impact Forecasting, part of Aon Benfield Analytics. Behind the software are models for a wide range of different event and peril types across many countries and regions of the world. To develop the different components of the catastrophe model, Impact Forecasting use a variety of proprietary and open solutions. Open Data sources such as OpenStreetMap, SRTM, CORINE land cover datasets are used, amongst others. The open-source programming language, Python, is also used extensively to create hazard footprints and files needed for the catastrophe model. The use of Open Source software and Open Data supplemented with other available proprietary data sources allow Impact Forecasting to build more flexible and transparent catastrophe models.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
20:54 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

MapServer REST API

MapServer doesn't have any build-in administration tool. MapServer REST API has been designed to manipulate the mapfile from HTTP requests (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE) based on RESTFul URL patterns. The presentation will show the basic concepts of the API, based on GeoServer REST API, and will make a live demo of managing a mapfile content with HTTP requests.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
18:59 FOSS4G Englisch 2013

Managing update of tiles of dynamic data

Tiling is currently the best solution to achieve high performance and throughput for serving map images. However, because tile images have to be prepared, tiling is often only used for relatively static data. The Dutch national facility for presenting governmental spatial plans, www.ruimtelijkeplannen.nl, is used intensively (app. 15.000 plans) and has high performance demands and therefore wanted to make use of tiling. Because plans often change and are added and deleted from the central database, a special solution was developed to manage the daily update of tiles. The presentation will concentrate on the solution to manage the daily update of tiles, the Tiling Manager. The Tiling Manager software queries the audit trail of plan updates, executes tiling tasks in collaboration with GeoWebCache and monitors progress. We had to deal with several challenges to realize the requirements, such as monitoring progress of tiling tasks in GeoWebCache, run-time generation of GeoWebCache configuration, optimizing WMS performance and assuring that the services will never present old tiles if new plans are available. In addition to the solutions to these challenges the presentation will show the technical architecture of the Tiling Manager.
  • Erscheinungsjahr: 2013
  • Herausgeber: FOSS4G
  • Sprache: Englisch
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