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22:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

The economics of bringing a new geo product to market by leveraging open standards, FOSS and FOSS4G

The cloud and open source software have fueled a wave of innovation that has enabled both large and small companies to bring products to market more easily and with less cost and friction than ever before. This talk will describe our journey to bringing such a new product to market. In 2014 Google began selling its high resolution imagery and purchasers received the data as large buckets of files deployed within Google’s Cloud Platform (GCP). This opened a requirement for high performance serving of that imagery via the Open Geospatial Consortium’s (OGC) WMS and WMTS standards. This talk will describe the process of a small company developing this image serving technology by both incorporating and contributing to open source and geo open source initiatives. The talk will describe the market opportunity for the new product as well as the business case that led us to choosing an open source approach even for something that is ultimately sold. The talk will also describe the Node.js technical approach that was chosen and the array of geo tools, such as Mapnik and PostGIS, and other open javascript frameworks (e.g. Bootstrap, Handlebars.js, etc.) that underpin the solution. The talk will also highlight our development team’s open source contributions back to projects and the community. The talk will conclude with a description of the lightweight server and its features that enable an “imagery as a service” business model that daily serves hundreds of users in Utah and Texas.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Trying to visualize GIS & BIM information on the web: a solution using Leaflet and Cesium

While GIS is a term whose use has now been consolidated for years now, BIM is a term whose use is increasingly widespread over the past few years. The both deal with geo-localized "objects", so the ongoing studies for a common point of the GIS and BIM different views of the same object is somewhat unavoidable. A first attempt at integration information belonging from these two worlds is presently under way in the framework of EU funded DIMMER project. This project integrates BIM, district level 3D models with near-real time data from sensors and user feedback in order to analyze and correlate buildings utilization, and to provide information about energy-related behaviors to users and other stakeholders. From the point of view of technology, the project uses open source technologies such as Java, Leaflet and Cesium, as far as GIS is concerned: here you're an architectural schema. The web application integrated GIS data read directly from a POSTGIS data base, with data flows from BIM services, near-real time data from sensors distributed over the territory under examination, and on line processed indexes/calculations. The present version of the project makes it possible to consult sensor information in near-real time, as well as the other processed calculations/indexes, through a web dashboard that includes as primary elements both a 2D map (based on Leaflet), as well as a 3D map (based on CesiumJS).
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Create Vector Tiles from OpenStreetMap

The OSM2VectorTiles project offers free downloadable vector tiles ready to use by people interested in hosting custom base maps on their own infrastructure. The whole world fits on a USB stick and can be served from an ordinary web hosting and styled and enriched to make beautiful and fast maps for web and mobile applications. The advantages of vector tiles over traditional raster tiles are well known. There are already a handful of vector tile provider present, but they may not always serve your use case optimally. After this talk you will know how to create your own custom vector tiles based on OpenStreetMap and will know the tools and processes you need to use. The talk will cover how to import OpenStreetMap data into PostGIS and then shows how to generate vector tiles using Tilelive and Mapnik. We will present the open source workflow we use at OSM2VectorTiles to prerender global vector tiles and instruct you how to adapt the workflow to create custom vector tiles. Thanks to Docker and tools such as Mapnik, PostGIS, Tilelive and Mapbox Studio Classic the process is straightforward and repeatable. Manuel Roth (HSR University of Applied Science Rapperswil Switzerland) Lukas Martinelli (HSR University of Applied Sciences Rapperswil Switzerland) Petr Pridal (Klokan Technologies GmbH)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Leveraging Big Geo Data through Metadata

The increase in the scale of traditional data sources, along with an explosion in the availability of sensor data, have originated massive volumes of data, a great deal of which is actually geolocated. This is partly due to the wide adoption of cheaper position technologies, and to the exponential growing of Volunteered Geographic Geographic Information (VGI) movements, which rely on crowdsourcing approaches. Big Data has generated a lot of interest amongst industry, the developer community and the public in general, and it has been at the core of many technology innovations which took place recently (e.g.: NoSQL, MapReduce); these new approaches already started to involve the geo community with projects such as the ESRI Spatial Framework for Hadoop or GeoTrellis, just to mention a few. However, the focus has been mostly on storing data (at the infrastructure level) and using data (at the analysis level), leaving aside challenges such as discoverability, integration or security. In this talk, we will address some of these outstanding challenges through the use of metadata and the semantic web, and show how the use of a decentralized and standardized catalog can help to unlock the five V's of Big Data: Volume, Velocity, Variety, Veracity, and most importantly, Value.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Interoperability with OpenLayers 3

This talk will focus on the many ways that OpenLayers 3 can integrate with different systems out there. Some of the abilities are integrated into the library itself, think of open standards such as WMS, WMTS, KML, GeoJSON. Other ways to provide integration is through external libraries such as ole, which integrates with Esri ArcGIS REST services (Map Services and Feature Services), or JSONIX to provide parsing (and serialisation) of a huge amount of OGC standards.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Sensor Web for Oceanology

In the marine community, observation data sets are a critical input for many scientific questions. Thus, significant investments are made in equipment and data acquisition technology. To ensure that the collected data is efficiently used by a larger number of researchers, the interoperable sharing of observation data is getting more attention in recent time. This presentation introduces open source Sensor Web components from several European projects such as NeXOS, FixO3, BRIDGES and ODIP II that cover different requirements for Sensor Web technology in marine applications. On the one hand there are server-side tools such as the 52°North Sensor Observation Service which facilitate the publication and download of marine observations. On the other hand this is complemented by tools such as the 52°North JavaScript SOS Client, which offers a lightweight approach to explore and visualise observation data sets generated by mobile (e.g. research vessels) as well as stationary sensors (e.g. buoys). In our presentation we will introduce the basic principles of an interoperable Sensor Web infrastructure for Oceanology as well as show how this infrastructure can be implemented using the open source software components of 52°North. Simon Jirka (52°North Initiative for Geospatial Open Source Software GmbH) Matthes Rieke (52°North GmbH)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

QWCII: A new QGIS Web Client

QGIS Web Client (QWC) is a Web-GIS client based on OpenLayers 2 and ExtJS and tailored to use special extensions of QGIS Server, such as extracting information from QGIS Project settings, extended GetFeatureInfo Requests, GetPrint and DXF export. It uses standard WMS/WFS commands, but extends them where needed. QWC is used by several cities and provinces in Europe. There are four main reasons why QWC needs to be overhauled: The code structure is not very modular and should be better structured. QWC only works well on Desktops. Despite a separate mobile web client based on OpenLayers 3 and jQuery Mobile, for maintenance reasons it would be much better to have a single web client that uses responsive design and works for all devices from a single viewer. The base libraries ExtJS 3.4 and Openlayers 2 have been phased out and there are newer versions available. However, the upgrade to the newer versions is not trivial. Having a more modern foundation based on newer web technologies This presentation discusses the requirements, the progress of this project, technical decisions taken and challenges solved during the project. While the first goal of the project is to establish a modern foundation for the coming years and reach feature parity with the old QWC project, it is already planned to implement a QWCII python plugin that offers a GUI and assists with the global configuration of the client. This tool should also facilitate the management of topics and projects.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

GeoServer in Production: we do it, here is how!

The presentation will describe how to setup a production system based on GeoServer from the points of view of performance, availability and security. The suggestions will start covering how a single node GeoServer should be prepared for internet usage, tuning logging, connection pools, security, data and JVM preparation, keeping disk, memory and CPU usage in check within the limits of the available resources. We’ll then move to tools used to monitor the production instances, ranging from probes to request auditing and watch-dogs. Finally the presentation will cover setting up a cluster of server and the strategies for keeping them in synch, from the traditional multi-tier setup (testing vs production) to the systems that need to keep an ever evolving catalog of layers constantly on-line and in synch.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:14 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Validating services and data in an SDI

To achieve interoperability in a spatial data infrastructure (SDI), conformance to specifications is essential for services and data. Service and data providers need a capability to validate their components. For several OGC standards, the OGC CITE tests provide such a capability. This covers base standards, but in SDIs typically additional specifications are added, for example, service profiles or data specifications. In the European Location Framework (ELF) the test framework ETF is used to validate INSPIRE services and data provided by National Mapping Authorities against the INSPIRE Technical Guidelines as well as against ELF-specific requirements. ETF is a test framework for spatial data infrastructure components. It supports SoapUI (for testing web services) and BaseX (for testing XML documents, including very large ones) as test engines to develop and execute test suites. ETF has been implemented in several iterations over recent years as existing open source test environments could not be configured to provide uniform test reports that were readable by and useful for non-developers. Outside of the ELF project, ETF is currently mainly used in Germany and the Netherlands, partly extending the INSPIRE-specific tests based on national profiles. We present the approach for developing user-friendly test suites and discuss typical issues that have been encountered in the ELF testing.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Processing Copernicus Sentinel data with GRASS GIS

Markus Neteler (mundialis GmbH & Co KG) Carmen Tawalika (mundialis)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Integration testing of Web Mapping applications (including web mapping server) using Python

When you are developing applications, you need to write tests. A unit test is a test written by the programmer to verify that small piece of code is doing what it is intended to do. The tests are intended for the use of the programmer. An integration test on the other hand is done to demonstrate that different pieces of the system work together. Integration tests cover whole applications, and they require much more effort to put together. The integration tests do a more convincing job of demonstrating the system works than a set of unit tests can. Unit tests can be great but they tightly couple your tests to your code, making it really fragile and anti Agile. We will show integration testing of web mapping applications using Python bindings to Selenium browser automation tool. We can test JavaScript application from Python environment, using standard unittest module. Since Python is very easy to be used and it's very universal language, it's easy to be learned by non-programming co-workers, who can automate application tests and help the developers with testing. Using integration tests in continuous integration development, enables us to be more agile, making sure that both parts - frontend and backend remain integrated even bigger refactoring occures. Part of testing is also background data services, with new project called WMSChecker. This is used in our Jenkins environment, so that system administrators can have overview about current status of running custom nad 3rd party services.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

How the Land Administration community profits from Open Source

The Social Tenure Domain Model (STDM) is a concept, model and information tool to map people-to-land relationships. STDM is developed and maintained by the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) under the lead of the UN Habitat. The data model was closely aligned with LADM, an ISO standard on Land Management followed by most implementers. When it came to implementing the software tool the GLTN group decided against reinventing the wheel but to check out existing Open Source components (as maintained by the OSGeo Foundation) and Open Standards (as maintained by the OGC). So basically everything from the data model, technology standards and up to all the tools required to do proper Land Administration is already there. But it is too complex for non-technical people to grapple with. Therefore the GLTN group started to implement a software package which shipped with the right data model for the Postgres and PostGIS database, the desktop software QGIS, reporting tools and comprehensive documentation. This presentation will give an overview of the software tool and underlying components to give participants with limited technological background a better understanding of how it works and how they can also profit from the abundance of great Open Source software that is out there.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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