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08:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GEO4ALL: Open Education Using FOSS4

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Keynote Lecture 1: Challanges & Strategies

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

istSOS: latest developments and first steps into the OSGeo incubation process

istSOS (http://istsos.org) is an OGC SOS server implementation entirely written in Python. istSOS allows for managing and dispatching observations from monitoring sensors according to the Sensor Observation Service standard. istSOS is released under the GPL License, and should run on all major platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac OS X). The presentation will go through the details of all the new features that will be packed in the next release. In particular the presenters will introduce enhancements that include the Advanced Procedures Status Page and the istSOS Alerts & Web Notification Service. The istSOS Advanced Procedures Status Page is a new section of the Web graphical user Interface, offering at a glance a graphically representation of the Sensor Network health. Administrators can easily figure out common issues related with sensor data acquisition and transmission errors. The istSOS Alert & Web Notification Service are the result of the Google Summer of Code 2014 outputs. This service is a REST implementation that take inspiration from the OGC Web Notification Service (OGC, 2003; OGC, 2006a) and the Sensor Alert Service (OGC, 2006b) which currently are OpenGIS Best Practices. Alerts are triggered by customized conditions on sensor observations and can be dispatched through emails or social networks. This year istSOS is entering into the OSGeo incubation process, this new challenge will permit to enhance the software quality and consolidate the project management procedures. The presenters will present the incubation status and discuss about the next steps.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Analyzing Fire Department Response with PostGIS

Local government fire departments always face scrutiny of their performance and efficiency. They are continuously asked to do a better job with fewer resources. In this highly technical session we will show how PostGIS is being used to analyze and measure performance throughout the city and plan for future resource requirements. Every city we work with is unique in some way. Some fire departments act as the local ambulance service while other cities contract with private ambulance companies. Emergency “911” response centers are often managed by police/law enforcement departments but not always! Many cities also have “mutual aid” agreements with neighboring cities to assist them when needed. For our customers PostGIS stores and manages the geo-located events (fires, hazardous spills, etc.) and provides details about the departments and individual emergency vehicle performance. It is most interestingly used to create statistical reports about things such as “Effecive Response Force” and “Resource Drawdown”, which are used to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. Please come to learn how PostGIS is used to analyze things such as primary response areas and fire hazard severity zones, allowing our customers to ask more advanced, geographically based questions.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Semantic assessment and monitoring of crowdsourced geographic information

Whilst opensource software allows for the transparent collection of crowdsourced geographic information, in order for this material to be of value it is crucial that it be trusted. A semantic assessment of a feature’s attributes against ontologies representative of features likely to reside in this location provides an indication of how likely it is that the information submitted actually represents what is on the ground. This trust rating can then be incorporated into provenance information to provide users of the dataset an indication of each feature’s likely accuracy. Further to this, querying of provenance information can identify the features with the highest/lowest trust rating at a point in time. This presentation uses crowdsourced data detailing the location of fruit trees as a case study to demonstrate these concepts. Submissions of such crowdsourced information – by way of, say, an OpenLayers frontend – allow for the collection of both coordinate and attribute data. The location data indicates the relevant ontologies – able to be developed in Protégé – that describe the fruit trees likely to be encountered. If the fruit name associate with a submitted feature is not found in this area (e.g. a coconut tree in Alaska) then, by way of this model, the feature is determined to be inaccurate and given a low trust rating. Note that the model does not deem the information wrong or erase it, simply unlikely to be correct and deemed to be of questionable trust. The process continues by comparing submitted attribute data with the information describing the type of fruit tree – such as height – that is contained in the relevant ontologies. After this assessment of how well the submitted feature “fits” with its location the assigned trust rating is added to the feature’s provenance information via a semantic provenance model (akin to the W3C’s OPM). Use of such semantic web technologies then allows for querying to identify lower quality (less trustworthy) features and the reasons for their uncertainty (whether it be an issue with collection – such as not enough attribute data being recorded; time since collection – given degradation of data quality over time, i.e. older features are likely less accurate than newer ones; or because of a major event that could physically alter/remove the actual element, like a storm or earthquake). The tendency for crowdsourced datasets to be continually updated and amended means they are effectively dynamic when compared to more traditional datasets that are generally fixed to a set period/point in time. This requires them to be easily updated; however, it is important that efforts are directed at identifying and strengthening the features which represent the weakest links in the dataset. This is achievable through the use of opensource software and methods detailed in this presentation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Image Geocoding as a Service

Driven by the ambition of a global geocoding solution, in this paper we present the architecture of an image geocoding service. It takes advantage of the ubiquity of cameras, that are present in almost all smartphones. It is an inexpensive sensor yet powerful, that can be used to provide precise location and orientation. This geocoding service provides an API similar to existing ones for place names and addresses, like Google Geocoding API. Instead of a text based query, images can be submitted to estimate the location and orientation of the user. Developers can use this new API, keeping almost all the existing code already used for other geocoding APIs. Behind the scenes, image features are extracted from the submitted photograph, and compared against a huge database of georeferenced models. These models were constructed using structure from motion (SFM) techniques, and heavily reduced to a representative set of all information using Synthetic Views. Our preliminary results shows that the pose estimation of the majority of the images submitted to our geocoding was successfully computed (more than 60%) with the mean positional error around 2 meters. With this service, an inexpensive outdoor/indoor location service can be provided, for example, for urban environments, where GPS fails.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Magical PostGIS in three brief movements

Everyone knows you can query a bounding box or even spatially join tables in PostGIS, but what about more advanced magic? This short symphony of PostGIS examples will look at using advanced features of PostGIS and PostgreSQL to accomplish surprising results: * Using full text search to build a spatially interactive web form. * Using raster functionality to look into the future. * Using standard PostgreSQL features to track and visualize versioning in data. PostGIS is a powerful tool on it's own, but combined with the features of PostgreSQL, it is almost magical.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Intelligent SDIs with MapMint 2.0

This conference aims at presenting the status of the MapMint open source project and its upcoming 2.0 version. The upgrade to newer versions of its core open source components will first be explained. The extensive use of OGC standards through ZOO-Project 1.5, GDAL 1.11 and MapServer 7 is indeed making MapMint an even more stable and efficient foundation to build an open source and standard-compliant spatial data infrastructure. The new metadata related functionalities being developed in interaction with PyCSW and CKAN will also be presented along with the assets of the CSW standard support. The new MapMint responsive user interfaces based on OpenLayers 3 and Bootstrap will also be presented. Both code and documentation improvements will also be detailed. The newly added functionalities in MapMint 2.0 will finally be explained from the developer and user point of views, based on case studies and live examples.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Building and integrating a Continuous-Integration system within your open source project

So you have an open source project or you want to create a new one. Maybe you have worked on a development project in the past that didn’t have quite the amount of rigor you would have liked. You know you want a build system for your project that is easy to administer, cheap, and powerful, but where do you start? Here is how we implemented our own process using free open source tools. We learned from experience that developers are more focused on solving problems than perceived “housekeeping” tasks. We needed tools that would automate the mundane, repeatable, mechanical, or human-difficult tasks so that developers could focus on what they are good at. We needed a single-sign on through Github to lower any barriers to tool usage that might exist. We needed a dead-simple way to determine if our commits broke functionality anywhere else in code. We needed to track how much of our code was covered by unit tests. Finally, we needed to be able to quickly and easily review each-other’s code and provide feedback. We decided on TravisCI to handle build duties in Maven with a nested project structure and also for its integration with Coveralls. For bug tracking, release scheduling, and task management, we chose WaffleIO for its tight integration with Github issues. One additional feature we desired was static analysis so that simple errors that lie outside of a linter could be caught and reported. This was handled by a combination of Coverity scans and a static analysis tool for Eclipse called Findbugs. Due to our platform support and third-party library (GDAL) requirement, the Github Wiki was the perfect place to keep all setup documents and other helpful articles for end-users and project new-comers. This system for software development worked quite well in most cases. Builds were automated, moderately tested (~40-60% coverage), and complaining to the team loudly via email when things broke. We had a new problem though: build breakages in the master branch and the inability to share code that was not yet fully functional. To alleviate this, we started using the branching and merging functionality that makes Git so valuable. Now, no direct commits occur to the master branch unless in very special circumstances. A developer will see the TravisCI build results before the merge ever occurs, allowing them to adjust code or test cases *before* they cause failures. As a side effect, the merge request workflow allows the team to perform code reviews quickly and easily. Finally, any CI system is not without challenges. Building a continuous integration system has upfront costs that should not be ignored. The payoff from those costs, however, is code/product quality and the avoidance of technical debt. Lastly, some of these CI tools lack support for private repositories.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Advanced Security with GeoServer and GeoFence

The presentation will provide an introduction to GeoServer own authentication and authorization subsystems. We’ll cover the supported authentication protocols, such as from basic/digest authentication and CAS support, check through the various identity providers, such as local config files, database tables and LDAP servers, and how it’s possible to combine the various bits in a single comprehensive authentication tool, as well as providing examples of custom authentication plugins for GeoServer, integrating it in a home grown security architecture. We’ll then move on to authorization, describing the GeoServer pluggable authorization mechanism and comparing it with proxy based solution, and check the built in service and data security system, reviewing its benefits and limitations. Finally we’ll explore the advanced authentication provider, GeoFence, explore the levels on integration with GeoSErver, from the simple and seamless direct integration to the more sophisticated external setup, and see how it can provide GeoServer with complex authorization rules over data and OGC services, taking into account the current user, OGC request and requested layers to enforce spatial filters and alphanumeric filters, attribute selection as well as cropping raster data to areas of interest.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Towards GeoExt 3 – Supporting both OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 6

GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/) is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy, rich data-package and architectural concepts of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha. Version 2.1 of GeoExt (currently in alpha-status) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and brought support for ExtJS 5 and is built atop the following installments of its base libraries: OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 5.1.0 (or ExtJS 4.2.1 at your choice). The next version of GeoExt (v3.0.0?) will support OpenLayers 3 and the new and shiny ExtJS 6 (not finally released at the time of this writing). The talk will focus on the following aspects: * Introduction into GeoExt * New features in OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 6 and how they can be used in GeoExt * The road towards GeoExt 3 * Results of the planned Code Sprint in June (see https://github.com/geoext/geoext3/wiki/GeoExt-3-Codesprint) * Remaining tasks and outlook The new features of OpenLayers (e.g. WebGL-support, rotated views, smaller build sizes, etc.) and Ext JS 6 (Unified code base for mobile and desktop while providing all functionality of ExtJS 5) and the description of the current state of this next major release will be highlighted in the talk. Online version of the presentation: http://marcjansen.github.io/foss4g-2015/Towards-GeoExt-3-Supporting-both-OpenLayers-3-and-ExtJS-6.html#/
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OSGeo and LocationTech Comparison

We have two great organizations supporting our Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial: The Open Source Geospatial Foundation and LocationTech. Putting on events like FOSS4G is primary responsibility of these software foundations - supporting our great open source software is! This talk will introduce OSGeo and LocationTech, and balance the tricky topic of comparison for those interested in what each organisation offers. We will also look at areas where these organizations are collaboration and explore possibilities for future work. Each of these software foundations support for their existing projects, ranging from "release parties" such as OSGeo Live or the Eclipse Annual Release. We are also interested in the ��incubation�� process each provides to onboard new projects. Review of the incubation provides an insight into an organization's priorities. This talks draws the incubation experience of: * GeoServer (OSGeo), GeoTools (OSGeo), * GeoGig (LocationTech), uDig (LocationTech) If you are an open source developer interested in joining a foundation we will cover some of the resource, marking and infrastructure benefits that may be a factor for consideration. We will also looking into some of the long term benefits a software foundation provides both you and importantly users of your software. If you are a team members faced with the difficult choice of selecting open source technologies this talk can help. We can learn a lot about the risks associated with open source based on how each foundation seeks to protect you. The factors a software foundation considers for its projects provide useful criteria you can use to evaluate any projects.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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