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Uncertain Concern

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but if the and the uh and and and OR OK probably a couple years ago you realize that a lot of the refugees coming up uh from Syria and to North Africa where um we're communicating were using technology in interesting way to find a way around a lot of the border for a patrols a lot of the hurdles that were put up in their way but in the US we have a similar issue but different in many ways I was illegal immigrants trying to stay on Easter radar and Alison Macdonald from by the University of Michigan is has been studying uh how the immigrants in the state in the states deal with technology and very different from here the if her branches are in the technology privacy society and human rights and I think we're to have an all-some top words so that will please welcome her and I will get will have the which I think for them and and I'm alison from the University of Michigan I'm talking today primarily about notes and technology and immigration enforcement and specifically about how the human community in the United States is responding to those changes and and especially on document a community and
before we get the too far into the details I just wanted to tell a little bit of a story this is Annamaria and she is not a real person she is sort of a composite of of many people that we spoke to other stories really representative of of a lot of people that have that we know are living in the United States today and she and her husband emigrated from Mexico about 12 years ago into the United States but she really wanted to have children but I couldn't get the fertility support that she needed in Mexico so she came to the United States and now she her husband have 2 children who are by attending US public schools and Gina has been novels working and saving up to you to buy a house they pay taxes they attend church every Sunday and they're involved in a lot of community events and I really integrated into into the local community and 1 difference from in a lot of other people is that I'm choosing in the United States as an undocumented immigrants what this means is that um she either entered the United States without legal authorization or she came out of the cell and overstayed the allotted time the the that means that some the you day-to-day she has to worry about being found for and and deported back to Mexico and removed from the home and and this in quite a precarious situation and trying to live a normal life of a life similar to a lot of other people in our communities and but with this this constant concern that and this life could be taken away from her she's detected other than this this 1 point
2 she really lives this immigration story that the United States loves to tell I we we love to have this narrative of people being able to come to the United States and build lives for themselves that they might not be able to build in their in the origin countries and that's exactly what she's done and but just as as natural to this immigration story and is the
history of a lot of discrimination racial racism and in a phobia an all the way back in that the 17 hundreds we've had uh legislation that prevents people from becoming citizens and based on their origin country and we've had for example the immigrat the Chinese Exclusion Act preventing people from China and laborers coming to United States entirely and the Asiatic bots only a couple years later just drew a box on a map and said the people in this region can immigrate to the United States and we've also seen things like the Johnson read immigration act in the 19 hundreds where it and that the US took census data from before b wave of immigration immigration and putting a quota system in place that essentially prevented people from Eastern and Southern Europe from coming to the United States and this history of of discrimination and racism
continues to today and many of you I'm sure you've heard of what's happening now with the the so-called Muslim band where a list of 7 countries are now blacklisted for immigrants are unable to enter the country and end this is just another data point to show that the trend that our our discourse and immigration policy in the United States is often racialized
but I wanna start a little bit of a what immigration enforcement actually looks like in the United States I that the agency that manages enforcement is called the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE the a and it is very in charge of of yeah the enforcing within the waters once you've already into the country and is finding people without documentation or managing immigration cases the and over the last couple of decades they've really been gaining in in size and power this is anything from the the removal of privacy restrictions and sharing data between federal agencies to and that an increase in in that financial resources after 9 11 so this is happening that even today president from back in January of have an executive order that is looking to add another 5 thousand agents to their current 20 thousand I'm over the next couple of years so this is an agency of continuing to be bolstered the and and another with the changing recently
is the the with the integrating technology into their jobs and disorder in particular shows up a fingerprint scanner the collection of biometric data is becoming really common in immigration enforcement and and it's not just when someone's taken into immigration office and but mobile fingerprint scanners have being taken into communities and their stories of people having their thereby metadata taken even without arrest and being stopped in the street or being near someone who's who's being detained for a particular reason that everyone in the area where everyone in the household having their biometric data taken but we've also seen on the removal of some restrictions on how this data can be shared between federal agencies and in particular and president of the president Trump reinstated the Secure Communities and program which allows local police officers when they're booking people for local crimes and or in in local uh jails to take by metadata and cross check it against federal immigration databases and crime databases the
we're also seeing evidence that so just as the Department of Homeland Security the umbrella organization over ice and we have recently seen through a Freedom of Information request the this organization has used uh cell-site simulators or stingrays I'm over 1800 times in the last 5 years we don't know all of the cases where these have been used and and we really can't speculate these these cases are shrouded in secrecy we don't know when and how they're being used but we do have 1 case is
actually close to my home in Detroit Michigan where an undocumented man and the the Nice was able to send a warning to Facebook to get his phone number and then use that phone number I with that cell simulator to track into his home and and deporting Intel Salvador were also seen this moved to start
collecting a social media data at the borders this isn't just for people on temporary visas but also naturalized citizens and people with permanent residence residency cards and the this might not be so relevant to people who were already in the country because they're not crossing the border regularly and but this might be impactful if they have friends and family crossing borders to visit them and any new immigrants as well this is a database that we don't really know what to it's being used for yet to come but there are some hints in the way that for example
and the as has been soliciting contracts from big uh data companies to create algorithms to do this extreme vetting to be able to find suspicious activity or suspicious people from troves of social media data but In fact we have already seen some
of these contracts being awarded uh there was a 3 million contract recently given to a company called giant oak
true glimpse to take the data and find bad guys the the previous slogans we see the people behind the data trademark and so on this is just another example of the way that technology is being used to and it in ways that are sort of unpredictable at this point but have we have many examples where this style of of research can often be uh discriminatory and and it might be expected that at this point in time technologies ending up integrated into law enforcement in the way that it's being integrated into a lot of different parts of our lives but there's a reason this moment in particular is so frightening
I the this administration is making it abundantly clear what they think of immigration and just say in less than a year so far we've seen the repeal of and the deferred action for childhood arrivals program which allows so here's the dream actor at the people you're talking but dreamers of this is a program that allowed people who entered the country under the age of 16 to get work permits and driver's licenses and attend university and have the um the immigration cases delayed and so long as the meeting Educational Goals and we've seen the elimination of privacy protections from and sharing data between federal agencies and and In addition to the to the actual concrete policy changes we're hearing a lot of really nasty rhetoric around immigrants and immigration and disclosing it a lot of concern a among people who were in the immigrant community out our Alice idiomatic community about the what this means in terms of harassment and hatred and even beyond that the legal changes the the we're also seeing a change
in in deportation practices I while Obama was prolific and deportations I he had a very explicit policy in place that the priority deportations would be people who were it's national security threats whatever that might mean or B was serious criminal records of people who had just recently entered the United States the the the policies being removed and we're seeing more and more people who are deported after living in the in the United States for a long time and with family and friends and the my built in the communities and who might have family or children who are US citizens who don't have criminal records so what is this means random
area 4 1 without a criminal record she previously might have been able to have some high-minded comments that she would be a priority target and the confidence is being eroded and were seeing a lot of people who previously 1 wouldn't have been targeted be deported regardless of their clean record and and this lack of but action that really makes them more visible than they have in the past she her husband is starting to think about what happens to them to their children if they're deported they have to make a decision because the children were born in the United States the US citizens and they have to decide whether they should give custody to friends and family who can stay in the United States but they should take them back to Mexico and rather than letting them stand at the US education that they 1 have the just be concerned about ice being in her community in outside of the home and possibly having a fingerprints taken issues in the wrong place at the wrong time the and she may have to worry about friends and family from Mexico visiting and crossing the border and having social media data taken from them that I mean as we all know might indicate a lot more than just about the person is crossing the border guard our social media lives a lot of information about the networks that might expose information about the it's also worth noting that
Anna-Maria's far from alone there are as many as 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States today over 2 thirds of them have been in the United States for more than 10 years which means they're are integrated into our communities they they own houses they have jobs that pay taxes delivery normalize it to the extent that they can and in the United States have built their lives here the the the
so With this context in mind and the i and some of my collaborators were wondering how this is really changing the way that people use technology or if it is and given the sort of objectively heightened risk that they're facing day today and we want to know whether or not there's any sort of reaction to those changes happening around in their daily lives the we
have reached out some of the immigration support organizations so immigrant rights and an activist organizations the and worked with them to be able to communicate with this community and in the end we were able to start 17 undocumented immigrants in the Midwest the we're primarily asking them it about how they manage risk in their daily lives offline as well as online and whether or not that's changing over the last year or but 2 years when this the discourse around immigration is really changing and then whether these changes that were seeing our causing them to maybe react and in a way that they're using technology I can tell you a little about who we spoke
to and the majority were women 14 of our 17 participants were women and most of them were in their mid thirties the average age 35 and a lot of them had children so it is a lot of parents and every 1 of us those you have been in the United States for more than 10 years so they really had their lives and their communities here and then most of the rules of from Mexico that's about consistent with the immigrant community in the United States especially from Latin America and the majority of from Mexico but and then there was a mix of of immigration stories some of the people we spoke to had crossed the southern border and by foot or otherwise and some people had overstayed visas had flown to the United States and stayed it so we
want to 1st get an idea of how they're managing and and sort of thinking about risk in their daily lives offline and together in a sense of how deeply impacts the way that they're living and will be found across the board is
that immigration it is a really sort of looming presence in their lives to think a lot about how they're exposing themselves and that possibly exposing their status to authority figures and and then they put like a lot of careful consideration to how to keep a low profile driving is 1 really good
example of this cost risk and cost benefit analysis the doing so most people we spoke to talked about driving 1 way or another about half chose to drive it captures not to and most of the people don't have driver's licenses for the United States because and it's difficult to get them without legal immigration papers an so the risk with driving is that if your stopped if you pulled over even if you didn't have a traffic violation the stuff for until later something the routine is to ask for it for documentation of license and if you don't have that there may be more questions and in the end you Could expertise of the immigration order or other legal and the law-enforcement the some people really thought it the risk was worth it to you to live their their lives how they want to they're going to try to just not think about the risk and do what they need to do today the other people felt that the risk was too great and and she was not to drive at all and that's a significant sacrifice especially in the United States were public transportation systems on and as sick others this might mean that the it they can set their own work schedule's or they can take their kids to school if they miss the bus and so it's a significant risk uh that but is also a big sacrifice you choose not to drive people also think a lot about how the
exposing themselves to authority figures and as 1 example of the decision to file taxes or not is a big risk so in the United States you don't need a you don't need to have any sort of government ID to file taxes you attacks ID so a lot of these people are filing taxes I but yeah In order to do that they are giving up to the federal government their names their addresses the employment history contact information and ends some people think that the risk is worth it right because this person for example feels like by paying taxes every year they're able to the a good as a history of of of abstaining behavior they can maybe have a better case forgetting a legal status if the time comes in that such an option 1 and another example of and the you know exposing information to authorities might be and filing for for benefits for US 1 children or even library cards are a or a local ID cards and and the risk is going to be different in each case pending what they're exposing
some people chose to for go significant benefits to avoid giving information to authorities and this person is talking about back the deferred action for childhood had rival program and this would make it much easier for the sun to go to college give the sun hopefully if they trust the program a much more reliable immigration status they wouldn't technically have a legal immigration status but they would be and sort of assured that their status or rather their immigration cases a low priority they wouldn't be docket as long as the attending universities they can have confidence to the program says that that they wouldn't be targeted and the DC lower concerned because in order of to file that that can work for the sun they had to give up a lot of information about themselves their phone numbers the names their addresses the and and in the end they decided not to do it and unfortunately only weeks after we spoke to this person and the doctor program was repealed and this is let a lot of people to be concerned because the people who did apply for the program have given that information to the government to immigration services in particular and at this point in time we have no assurances that that information will be used in immigration cases at the at the moment there's just sort of FAQ page that says that says we we don't use this information now but we reserve the right to change at any time without telling anyone the people are also really
feeling the changes that are happening in the last couple of months well tend to many months plus during half of they're feeling the pressure in the community is for the immigration service is being or immigration forcing being more present and ends less predictable of 1 person described as and feeling like instead of coming to take a particular person they're just coming in looking for anyone you might be undocumented the many people that we spoke to had negative experiences with ice including if it weren't if they hadn't had experience themselves lots of people have friends and family you have negative experiences and and they're feeling is increasing presence of enforcement in their communities and this is leading them to make significant changes to the way they're living ourlives and for example 1 person we spoke to talked about how they will the child at home alone anymore because they're worried that while they're out their child and it is the picked up while the out of the child's at home alone they might be left there were ice might even show up at house well the child they're alone they don't want either those things to happen so the my changing a lot of the ways that
they that they live day-to-day and this is a very present concerns in a way that they talk about the their daily lives so we're wondering if this is true when I think about the way that these technology whether doing online the and
1st let me just give you an overview of what sort of technologies that primarily use and this community really mobile have the uh some people had computers in the home a lot of you will have access to computers to local libraries and things but everyone has smartphone and they were very dependent on and some people use e-mail but when they spoke about e-mail is mostly to do with that and the communicating with a kid schools or doctors appointments it wasn't really a social thing so the majority vote we spoke to people of our social media tools in particular and
although 1 of our participants were active users of Facebook but most people were using like that and Facebook Messenger as well this is the 3 primary tools that people had the most to say about and there were some other tools
that they're on Instagram Twitter and and Snapchat's the really the overarching and so in a sense that people had about these tools is that it's bringing
significant benefits to their daily lives and especially when you think about this community being separated permanently from a lot of their friends and family back home and or their their former home and their origin country and what they had to do before maybe sending photos in the mail or through postcards by international calling cards being able to call people with video chat now is a significant improvement to the ability to keep in touch with people back in in in Mexico or in wherever there they're origin countries the it will also talked about how it's improving their lives in other ways and for example being able to organize their own work schedule's and and have more control over the way that the and employed the the benefits go on and on and has a lot of the same things that we've experienced over the last decade the way there are lots of change for the better because we are able to use these technologies when we
ask people about risks and the things that really pop into their heads 1st hackers they're really concerned about fraud and identity theft and ends this single at about the children contacting strangers on the internet are accessing inappropriate content and this but that's not to say that concerns related to their to their status their legal status were absent it is I'm much less certain you know um the it's easy to to think about that the consequences of of identity theft that sort of concrete but a lot of these and status related concerns were less less concrete and it will to a harassment as well being something at increasing in the real world as well as online in particular participating in
communities in conversations online that may be exposed their immigration status and this harassment is moved online at their experienced in the real world as well but I there you the hearing stories are having stories themselves about people threatening them with immigration enforcement I the that's that's increasing over the last year so the there are a couple of ways that people manage these risks and
the primarily with will we found people really thought about as their their concrete steps to managing their privacy online where fairly basic things like making sure they only accept friends and family on Facebook and they might have and set their profile the private but they're really not fiddling with these more fine-grained privacy settings the they're not you know sharing particular post only to particular people are using it that they were talking about that didn't tell us about using these like private groups or anything like that to thrift create separate spheres of of of friends and family and and channel management just in the sense that like even though they had the think about them during reading this site close network of friends and family they still really thoughtful about what they post in which in which channel and whether like it safe to put a photo for example on the wall it you know in a timeline versus sending it directly to family the this person for example
even after they post something publicly publicly being you know it within their Facebook we know wall those still go back to a couple days later distally everything because not totally confident that that's private which the another really interesting thing is that the
In all this the conversations we had an no 1 really express the sense that they understood that but they're really living on
Facebook and the tools that they're using most circuit but almost exclusively are all owned by same company and the no 1 also express any sort of sense these companies are entities in themselves that might have interest in access to the data and much less 1 that cooperates with law-enforcement that concern didn't appear in any of our conversations and they they tend to think about these platforms as being served as a medium to communicate with other people you know the way the user is is to talk to other individuals or groups of individuals but that the platform doesn't seem to be like a repository for data the some that they're expressing significant trust in Facebook this book in particular and a lot of people were grateful for that change the Facebook's made over the last year so I or to and in terms of account management so and they're grateful that if there's a suspicious login attempts they'll be able to stop it and that's helped a lot of people and that's a generates trust in these platforms 10 the sense that phase but really has the back that in addition to sort of managing their the way they're sharing information and we did see
some people choosing to abstain erm sharing and especially when it came to topics around immigration and tabular chose to not join and you know public Facebook groups or get information from certain places because they were afraid that by associating with these groups they might indicate something publicly about the status
the and and that's frustrating for a lot of people who want to participate in these conversations in especially because the discourse around immigration so toxic in the United States and 10 some people express this feeling that they have to just sit there and take this the this this course happening around them without participating because they're worried about being targeted or harassed and or maybe even like having physical consequences being followed or being having immigration into the house if someone were to find them and some people expressed the opposite though
and which is encouraging right some people felt that's even though the risk is there they it's more important for them to share their thoughts that is for them to be tiptoeing around immigration enforcement and the this is also really interesting because this service exposes sometimes family tensions about these topics and this is a really it's a mix status community meaning that sometimes parents documented in children of a US citizens or lots of people have friends and family who have a different legal status do so risk is really distributed in was not just individual it's within families and within communities and there can be a lot of tension between you know children and parents or friends in know siblings about how they share information on these platforms and some people are much more diverse conservative with what they share and the then this could also reveal something else kind of interesting at when we talk to people about concerns about immigration and it's very rarely that they talk about whether immigration will be able to investigate them as much as about when the and which is this this final point that is really the sense of
resignation in the community about what information of immigration enforcement has about them the the I about lesser
people feel like it doesn't really matter what they do an immigration can can know where they are and what they're doing and they can find them if they just decide to it's just a matter of whether immigration forces can choose to come after them as and when they can the this is also
true with the way that they think about technology the they have a sense that there's really no privacy if it immigration decided to and they would be able to see the messages on Facebook and they could see what was physically on their phones and that they have this sort of all powerful no tool kit to access to digital information the and lastly this story in particular as the this sense of surveillance comes from experience often but this person had a really negative experience with with ice at you know coming in talking to her family and I snowing things that they haven't told anyone somehow they guys had known things that they were keeping very private and so there's this assumption that while it's happening before I've seen it happen to my friends they probably could know anything they want to the and the so the but not
all negative is not all resignation and another thing that we saw many people not everyone but maybe have a few we spoke to had this really strong sense that there is this responsibility to share things in the community to help each other there's this growing sense of community identity and and this might mean sharing information about resources for the inner ring community or sharing information about workshops or events vigils and but also information about immigration enforcement if if i is is in a particular community they might tell their friends and family to avoid this area until further notice that they're helping each other they're sending information so it can be a total resignation there still this to the beam of hope that they're helping each other and they must have hope that they can do something because they are this is this has been something that has become faster and easier with technology to right it's much easier to to send a message that is to to call or to spread information before we had In a smart phones
but all this really leads to the question considering how much the inconvenience themselves in their daily lives off 1 why are they doing comparatively little online to change their practices or to to reduce the visibility and I don't think it's enough that the although lot of people expressed the sense that they're like relatively of low tech literary that that of itself isn't really enough of an explanation right and there so many different factors into the way that they're making these decisions and thinking carefully about the decision that you make I so we have some thoughts on
this it really can be understated how much of a benefit technology is to this community is making a significant difference the way the difference in the way they live their lives and so the choice to abstain is not trivial of the risk of the facing by using like Facebook Web putting phone numbers on Facebook or sharing photos of of their family and friends and like building these online networks it is really at the risk involved in that is uncertain right at this point we have really sparse data about direct connections between the use of technology at the use of social media and immigration enforcement and consequences maybe that will change but at this point it's unclear which changes might be actually beneficial right because there's not a direct connection between using this tool putting this information online and immigration enforcement showing up there's also the significant trust in in the platforms that they're using and and their peers a using as well and and they just tends to be less critical thought about the safety of using platforms when there is already this component of trust Facebook has done a lot for account security for example over the last couple of years and then as build trust in this community and 10 as well as having you know all of your community on a tool that when they're older together there's like less of a less critical thought about whether there it it it's safe to be there the and there is this component of resignation and when we've sort of push people to think really explicitly about the risk with immigration enforcement being in sharing information on social media using technology and there was the sense that the the if they wanted to they could have the information I mean they already have in a lot of ways when they're filing taxes or or just you know it's accessible to authorities and is the general sense of regardless of what they do online so this kind of in in combination with the uncertain risk it makes it really hard to make concrete steps towards changes that might be helpful I the
so am fine it's not a share a couple of things that I learned especially as a visual security trainer in doing this in the study and
most importantly everyone of his spoke to was really excited to learn and deaths just general like Tech literacy but also security and privacy people really care and they're excited and and you expressed that gratitude that we were talking then about this topic that they care a lot and but so what was difficult for me having a background in trainings was still being surprised by things that it is conversations that thinking you what they wanted and what they needed and and that not been the case so 1 thing I would say is you know don't assume that you know what's best for them on all you know what they want need to go and talk to people there really and you'll learn a lot from talking to people about what they think they're risk is versus what they're doing I for example something that I was surprised to learn is that but they're really not using online resources when they have concerns about online privacy and the talking to the kids and talking to their neighbors and their friends so for this community in particular would be really but much more effective to go into and in-person training training in Spanish in this case in the language that their Naturally Speaking 10 have like in person resources that will get you much further than you know compiling lists of of ideas the tools or or strategies and better probably never be accessed any as a vehicle to
do this 1 we had a really positive experience working with support organizations and on the front end that allowed us to build trust with the communities so by working with people who they are interested in RTD them well and I really think we're able to start to be much more openly in much with much more trust than they would have otherwise whether they would uh starting to solve this question and they also are a great a great resource for us as we were developing an interview materials and also by training materials afterwards and 1 went back to the communities and then the it conducted digital trainings and they helped us develop you know culturally sensitive language and and we were able to just ask you know is this location is the style of presentation is this length is this time what should we do you know they they were resource to us to make sure that the things that we're developing or most accessible to the people that we're talking to and up on they also themselves but from what I've seen have a lot of questions about the way the using technology and that's a great place to go Ted talk to people about you know organizational practices and you might find is a lot easier to get people to change their practices at the in 3rd an organizational setting where there's peer pressure maybe some hierarchy of of people who are really encouraging them to use my secure see more secure tools or to to think carefully about data they're collecting about people that they contact the and so working with these organizations also might be an opportunity do do trainings West with activists and with lawyers and with other people who are working alongside this community
abound finally and which is always a difficult thing to here as a trainer and the people we those you probably are going to be adopting new tools and for 1 it might not be safe and it's hard to make that calculus right um but a tool those specifically designed 4 and the community at risk or not in order to do a particular function that would be of interest to for example the enactment a community or some other vulnerable community might increase visibility depending on the threat model and if the founder the particular apathy happens like exposing the number of users or location of users for example the and it's not as say that we should stop developing new tools we always think about ways to make better and safer and more private and resources but it is worth thinking especially if you're going to be working with communities are are building resources for communities that we should think also about how to make sure that they're using the tools there already used and more effectively and more safely and that might mean sitting down with someone for a while and and going to the red is setting on Facebook you know making sure that the settings and what's out don't back up data to the cloud or and expose phone numbers to people they don't know and but there's a lot to do in both of these directions an yeah and it it this especially if you're going to be moving into a working with these communities to something to keep in mind that I thought was especially poignant that I can take
questions the if and it so we have um 4 microphones in this room I C 1 is already occupied with somebody may I remind you that a question is typically 1 to 2 sentences and ends with a question mark and and without whole Luo take would take microphone for had this out of you mentioned that these communities are reluctant to adopt new tools were there any exceptions to that are around the that you use tools that you think there would be more likely to die yeah that's a good question I have been thinking about this I would say that this is absolutely true what is it about reluctance adopting tools where it's when we're talking about social media so it's difficult to like move people to signal for example from what's where is that messenger because the people they talk to you are already on these tools and is not having 1 person but like a community and it was there to think about tools that might be a special purpose so we didn't talk to anyone who mentioned this app but I know it in the past there have been discussions of a waves the user thicker crowdsourced map system being used like attract law-enforcement and but is that we do not anywhere you use the that have but possibly if there's like a specific utility unit there could be some critical mass of people who spread the word and in a small community and there is something to think about it I don't think it's possible but I would say it would be challenging time um the baby doesn't wanna microphone 1 somebody got a microphone 3 the the I have 2 questions that OK and yet the accused the first one is kind of a nitty-gritty academic question and that is can you tell us anything about your IRB approval process what you're doing to protect subjects status of this this is very sensitive I'm curious how you've approach that yes we have to begin the approval before is not to anyone and we actually got an exemption from for collecting data about participants so we compensated for each interview them at every gave a policeman's 20 dollars and we were not required to collect any proof of payment I we recorded the interviews and encrypted them locally but they were translated by people in our our research group and then transcribed but with all identifying location and name data redacted and and that those are all stored in cryptid on personal drives and then at the University right at all it has been deleted now all of the original data as well thinks and the other 1 is the big picture scattering question which is about how this is a technological solution to a political problem do you feel that directly or helping immigrants understand how to protect themselves technologically it is the answer were necessarily part of the answer were do you feel like maybe eventually are community needs to be helping people x at places like the US the increasingly hostile to immigrants that's a good question I I don't think that helping people he was safe online is really a solution I mean this solution is gonna be in policy in in law but I think the utility really in the short term is like making sure people feel safe and like have more control over disclosure to the said that they can but I don't think that's going to I'd I don't think as a winning you know single prong battle but as for leaving the united states as kind of a funny question considering how much people sacrifice to come to the US and especially having integrated into communities already and a lot of the people I spoke about today where long-term residents I mean everyone was a long-term resident said sort of built their lives in the US but there has been a significant decrease in the number of people emigrating to the US at without the authorization of those things to Obama error policy like you know return immediately at the borders so whether people are now moving to other countries is a good question and whether we should encourage that as that in yet another interesting and of my to hi and I'm done have questions the in initiatives to help and the people in a way that Sue the 5 and tones of the few but they are
and this this my and and they don't perceive the risk as much and you feel that helping them Anderson understand the risk and may be trying to be more secure online with actually help them a more in the box and the resignation boards governments and actually it's but it is thinking about a specific people and think maybe 1 individuals that information is going to be accessible it in a long run if if immigration enforcement really chooses to be that that sense of resignation to some extent is accurate lots of people aren't necessarily on the reader and ends I think I know what's most beneficial about helping people understand how to use technology more effectively in like it does really just increasing confidence and if this uncertainty in my choosing to abstain from participating in conversations because they just don't trust that they can be sick but private enough in or that their personal information their home addresses that they think they're still at risk of this harassment because that lack of covenant confidence and privacy is really what I think we can be helped and the the ends I'm had another point and but yeah but it's worthwhile you know thinking about how you can contribute to helping them even even outside of thank you privacy work a lot of people really just are eager to learn more about how these technologies like to tell their lives I right so the using of them so as and we also put put significant thought into whether or not you know how to have these conversations with people and they can ask questions about you know the risks online without really freaking out and because we don't really have solutions so it's not like at the end of an interview he said well we have a solution for you just as well as and you'll be safe but so sort of this balance between making sure that people still you know use tools in the way that so helpful for their lives right like we don't want them to stop using Facebook if it means that they stop talking to their parents that can Mexico we don't want them to stop using e-mail that means that they can talk to their kids teachers anymore so it's this balance between like being aware of the risk can being confident that you doing as much as you can well not choosing to abstain but so hiding in a corner we couldn't find as you would a summary the number for the this summer there yes so Mike for please thanks and hi soul I was wondering since Facebook is the most popular tool but the use and they're probably won't change did you find anything that if people at Facebook could do to help some undocumented immigrants more yeah I think that I think the things that Facebook and there are really generalizable to a lot of vulnerable communities and the people there were a few things in particular that some people really uncomfortable with and where you have a WhatsApp it and if your attitude to like a group of people your phone numbers exposed to everyone else in the group but without your consent and and I might be the case with like group SMS and things like the vector was that he uses a phone number is kind of something that should we should migrate out of right on Facebook collecting phone numbers in collecting you know location data regardless of of how easy it is to opt in and out and and so this this is formally in academic work and that's going to appear at the at kind is a human computer interaction conference and we talk a lot in the paper about what these bigger services can do and I really like we as a community can advocate for the Facebook resisting cooperating with law enforcement right and mean and it shouldn't be metaphase but we live of how you got there there was a social media platform they shouldn't be you know helping immigration move people around physical borders they should they should be totally in a border agnostic and tell advocating for that kind of added to shift would be helpful um Michael into the the the so thank you for a very interesting talk and I have a question the thoughts of stuff on the previous 1 and the puts you talk about this has become such an important political factor in this in this arena I'm wondering if you've been following up on that as the survey research problem like what's what is they are what is it that they are doing and this is something that that's happening
unwillingly or is there something about that there was general strategy of Facebook that serve helps create this kind of analysis and I'm also wondering goal taking that action further sorry it's more than a sentence that that if you if if if you've been thinking about if if you see anything served suddenly rolling that trust in the future and I'm specifically thinking about this now this question about how it was possible for all this Russian of money to gold maintaining the advertisements and that surface that kind of points in the direction of pressure for Facebook to be less less serve general in in in that trust and speaking up on certain on specific political issues which would also be immigration n is closing some information that they already have have to version of a whether there could be a shift in interest In the future something could trigger that um this as the sample in Detroit right where 1 version was able to get a phone number from Facebook with a warrant and then track the person with this 1 number and if there are more and more cases of of social media data being used in immigration cases in this there is evidence that that that might happen but it's possible that that the that narrative might overtake this sense that people have right now that Facebook's looking out for them by keeping their count you know there's that letting them control it but it in terms of Facebook picking up immigration as it as a but an activist there are a political topic that their interested I would not hold my breath but now in some but we'll see yes so we have time for exactly 1 more question that is on like 1 part on did you collect and the information of so the anything about uh on the on the people or using financial services and so things like online payments were developed by accounts with the consent of the financial news yeah however actually people the the concerns that have with privacy and engines of the way that there is using like online banking these people were I mean using credit cards and online banking and paying rent and your utilities online and didn't much in that context except that they have this concern about the if financial information being stolen by hackers right like the concern is for other people rather than the entities that are there providing these services and and and I think a lot of the concern there is coming from the fact that they have a lot to lose and very few legal protection should something that happened to them and but yes OK so just generally like people were using online banking and had accounts and and we're using these online financial services some people word opting out but it wasn't due to privacy concerns it was because they were worried about using a credit card on the Internet and but so with that i'd like you to help me thank our speaker Alison for is wonderful talk and so if to was
that hns and if you have a a and the proof that it took the it
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Metadaten

Formale Metadaten

Titel Uncertain Concern
Untertitel How Undocumented Immigrants in the US Navigate Technology
Serientitel 34th Chaos Communication Congress
Autor McDonald, Allison
Lizenz CC-Namensnennung 4.0 International:
Sie dürfen das Werk bzw. den Inhalt zu jedem legalen Zweck nutzen, verändern und in unveränderter oder veränderter Form vervielfältigen, verbreiten und öffentlich zugänglich machen, sofern Sie den Namen des Autors/Rechteinhabers in der von ihm festgelegten Weise nennen.
DOI 10.5446/34860
Herausgeber Chaos Computer Club e.V.
Erscheinungsjahr 2017
Sprache Englisch

Inhaltliche Metadaten

Fachgebiet Informatik
Abstract Over 11 million undocumented immigrants live in the United States today. Immediately after taking office, the Trump administration issued two executive orders pumping resources into border and immigration enforcement agencies, heightening fears of deportation, harassment, and family separation among immigrant communities. In the following months reports emerged of increased immigration enforcement activity and hints about the deployment of new high-tech methods by the immigration enforcement agency. I will discuss the current state of immigration enforcement in the US and associated surveillance capabilities, the results of a study with undocumented immigrants about their technology practices, and the takeaways for the technology and privacy community in supporting communities of heightened risk.
Schlagwörter Ethics, Society & Politics

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