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Policing in the age of data exploitation

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and and a and a and B the other 2 people from Paris international 1 this year bloom do monte she's Research Officer of working on data expectation especially in the global self uh and movie would cruised the larger and thus foraging against a spy agencies and before that she font 7 years against police consensus and they're gonna talk be talking about policing in the Age of Data exploitation the rule will come few it and as was just said I'm being Privacy International for 2 years working as a lawyer before that I spent 7 years bringing cases against the police and increasingly concerns me based on these experiences is a lack of understanding of what tactics to being used by the police today and what's legal basis they're doing this on the lack of transparency undermines the ability of activists lawyers and technologists to challenge the police tactics and wasn't sure a lot of you have a broad awareness of the technology that the police can use and I don't think this is enough and we need to know what specific police forces a user against individuals the reason why is
that when you're it's you need to know what disclosure to ask for in order to prove your innocence yeah your lawyers need to know what expert evidence for in order to defend their client I'm increasingly as there invisible ways for seemingly invisible for the police to monitors a scale we need to know that their effective legal safeguards now those are affected and not just the guilty for those who understand technology they include pensioners such a strong caps and I
0 man here is a peace protester and he's a law-abiding citizen no criminal records and yet he is on the UK domestic extremism database and listed here some of the entries and he took his cat sketch pad the may draw rings he's clean shaven and he was holding a board with orange people on it so this is the kind of people that they're debating Jones case exposes unlawful actions by the police but these actions date back to 2005 to 2009 the as far as I'm aware that there are no cases challenging modern police tactics and Privacy International in the UK and with our partners throughout the world are increasingly concerned at the pace this is developing unobstructed because people don't know what's going on and so that it's we've started in the UK to try and cover some of the police tactics using Freedom of Information requests these laws should be available throughout Europe and we want to make similar requests in other countries hopefully with some of the 2 9 and it's my colleague Eva who talk a bit about Privacy International some of the tactics we know the police using and then will speak about some of the things that we found out through our initial research being thank you so I'm just going
to tell you a little bit more about privacy international for is that you done this organization we are based in London and I we cytokine surveillance and the center right to privacy across the world basically essentially what we're doing is that we do litigation we research and carry out advocacy including at the United Nations and we give up policies on issues that are defining modem right not all works ranges from litigation against
intelligence services to a wide range of reports on issues such as connected cars smart cities and tech I with the recently published investigations on the role of companies like cambridge island it's John Harrison easier and add the role in the latest union elections with all network of the organization across the world we advocate for stronger privacy protection in the law and technology and stronger safeguards against a valence now we talk about data expectations is actually the title of the talk so what do we mean by dots the concept
of the text the excitation emerge from all concerns that's the industry and governments all the all building a world that prioritize the exploitation of all data we observe 3 prevailing trends in data excitation 1 is the excess of data that's generated beyond our control by the 2nd 1 is the fact that this data is processed in way we cannot say I cannot understand or influence and the lack of transparency around it the last 1 is that at the moment this data is used to disadvantage of the ones who producing up any further empowering the already powerful we call the control the data anymore that's generated for friends in our computers but now in the world we live in and they just don't come just from 0 5 or computers it comes from because we're driving it comes from a payment systems from the cities we live in this is all generating data and this data is used by other entities to make assumption about us and take decisions that eventually inference or all we entitled to learn do we qualify for affordable insurance she will be sent to jail all set free who should be the rest this is at the core of an of the world that we're building around the the excitation the question of power imbalance between those who have the dates up and who gets to make decision based on this data and this war uh producing the daytime losing control over it of now what is the least thing have to do with data what is uh sorry what is data excitation have to do with the least as the police has always been actually using using data in the past to give you are 1 example in uh 1980 a transit police officer named Jack Maple I developed a protocol chart of the future this is hard he described it
I call them the child of the future on 55 feet of wall space I'm not every train station in York city in every train then I use credence to mark every violent crime robbery and grand larceny other cured why not the sole versus the enforced now the system was uh used by uh the trend people is an it was credited with reducing I reducing felonies by 27 % and robberies by a 3rd between 1990 and 1992 so this generated a lot of a lot of interest in this project and former New York Mayor R. Rudolph Giuliani Austin your police departments to essentially take up to alter the future and developed during our during project it became
our comes starts outcomes that was again essentially are essentially about Martin crime but try and to try and make assumption about prior work right work right where the crime or a happening up to this kind of show you this a narrative that the building of this narrative around this idea that the more data you have the more data you generates had the better you'll be i'd reducing crime now it becomes interesting in the world 11 that we describe where we're constantly generating data often without the consent or even the knowledge of our of do while producing this data to on new questions to be asked art what data is the police entitled amateur excess what can you do with it all we'll becoming suspect by default 1 of the key elements of the and the intersection between data excitation and policing is the question of small cities it was very in mind that's bad data-driven policing as often referred to as small policing so obviously the word small has been used earlier did it in a generic manner by various industry to point of described this strain of using mass data collection in all that you are on you provide new services but that there is actually a really interesting connection between our between small cities and our and data-driven policing the 1st reason for
that is that actually are 1 of the main reason for um for what different for the keys to invest in a small city infrastructure is actually the question of security I this is something I we've explored in your latest report on small cities and I know it this is emerging also from the work was doing was other organization including coding right scene of Brazil and arrest in Pakistan so actually Brazil is an interesting example because these are the folder media events this altered organizing like the the football World Cup and the Olympics they invested massively in smart city infrastructure including uh projects with idea and are and at precisely the purpose of what we're trying to achieve its there's not infrastructure wars and making the city safer so it was extremely strongly connected with and the police said this is a picture for example of them of the control room that was built of to control CCTV cameras and you create graphs and in order to showcase where criminal record crime was happening and uh also in a way the likeliness of natural disasters in some areas but in practice and is the wall you program uh on investment of small cities which is actually referred to as the CCT projects the the but now companies understand
that very well and I this is actually um an image from an IBM presentation describing their vision Oliver of small cities analysis see like policing height is very much integrated into division of their heavily centralized vision of what as cities are to so that's no wonder it that's uh companies that a dead ultra-small to infrastructure all actually now also measuring our platform for policing this companies include IBM as I mentioned but also Oracle and Microsoft so we see in many countries including the UK are way we based on some pressure on budgets and budget reductions for the police and said the reason various appeal was this narrative that you can put chase and you converges platform you can gather more data that will help you I G policing in last time our and then do it more efficiently the the legal foot is given to you to the impact on society or right to privacy and what happens if someone is expected to take the reins of power do now we can it briefly I briefly explain what's and uh data-driven policing looks like and and eventually merely will look charts and art of findings so the 1st thing I wanted to discuss
is actually a predictive policing I because that's all for an hour something we think of and talked about uh when we think about data-driven policing I mentioned comes before and essentially uh predictive policing works on a similar premise the idea is that if you marked where crime happens but you can eventually get where crimes and where the next crime will happen so the key player in
i in predictive focusing is this company called PredPol I IV I think they describe pretty much was the due to use artificial intelligence to help you prevent for crime right predicting where and where when and where crime will most likely a cure yeah now praetorian at a company using something called a hoax process II debts use normally to you for the prediction of an F grade trema is so what her perhaps originally did is that use analyzing Hall after NF quick you have a you have after shakes and usually after shake thing to happen where the original and the original ture um earthquake happened and initial period of time after that so
there words bruises basically is described as what a certain Evan happens other events of the same kind will happen shortly after in the same good in the same location now we see that she works quite well for earthquakes whether it works for crime is a lot more questionable but that that's actually add the premise on which um on which companies that are referring include a predictive policing services all our or relying so basically apply to predictive policing dementia is monitoring data on um on and places where crimes happening you can identify Jurassic hot spots where crime will make psyche happen again now other companies that PredPol or joining a
and they all adding more data and then just simply location of past crimes so this data have included open-source intelligence and talk a little bit more about this later on about weather reports sensor data are the location of landmarks like ball churches schools they of sporting events and faces and not quite sure what you're doing was faces but somehow that something that you think the to and when I do when n put predicts if leasing 1st of in marriage 1 of the the key concern with our whether all world was
going to be turning into Manresa reports on the scenario where people arrested before crimes even committees it's and companies like Triple a quick to you every should people and say that do not concern about who will commit crime but where crimes happening now that's not actually true because it in fact i'd moment we see several run programs emerging especially in US our where police departments all concerned not so much with where crimes happening but whose committing it's so I'm going to talk about it you
example of this 1 is the Kansas City no violence I alliance a which is a program laid by the local police to identify who will become the next criminal basically and using an algorithm that combines data from traditional policing as well as social media intelligence and other information that have on drug use based on this they create graphics that generated using predictive policing you should have certain people are all connected you could already convicted criminals and gang members ones of identified as people their request meeting with them whether this committed crimes or not in the past and at what date it would have a discussion about their connection to do is add to this convicted in a criminal and gang members and what they tell them is that they all wore that each requirement happen during network of people every person connected to this network will be arrested whether or not an idea actually and they were actually involved in the crime being committed now they're actually dozens of police department they're using similar programs uh in as you get the Chicago Police Department has an index of the 400 people most likely to be involved in violent crimes that song like above the adults a but actually I there is a reality which is uh which is extremely concerning because the people who are in this list or as for the most part not actual criminals do or purely seemed to be connected to people who have committed crimes crime so next you eat your next door neighbor is um is a criminal they you may well find you know for your name on that list now predictive policing is deceptive and problematic for several reasons but 1st of all there is a question of the presumption of innocence in a world where even before you commit a crime you can find your name on that list all be um uh called by the police you know what what happens to the very basis of of of democracy which is the prevention of the of innocence but also it is not a question of like can we reuse of earthquake it did the mass that was originally designed for earthquake and applied to human beings but because the human beings to work like of quake they have their in our there in sets of the biases devices Stoltz with and how we collect the data for example if the police is more likely to be released as uh to bodies areas where um there uh met the minorities people of color in all these the the data it will have will be disproportionately higher by our own and persons of color likewise the there and likely to investigate white collar crime we will be likely to have data are that I was it better reflecting a reality where crime also happens in wealthier areas so basically we are improving bed by is that says that obviously will lead to biased results and what is biased results really is that uh is that he will incur continued did the already existing trends of 0 the police in communities of color and low-income communities the liberty merely for the next fall and so 1 of the
things that happened in the hands on you how handle and it was end this and it's not the way that all of the cell and the thing that the volume of that the unit so I know you and you and all those of people who have no idea they would end up in a police state space because they're associated with you retained for as long as the police wish now these devices a pretty user-friendly for the police and if you're interested you can look on you tube aware celebre 1 of the big players has lots of videos about how you can use them and and so depending on the device and the operating system and some of the data this is from air a please
document but it lists what they can extract using a set of right you FET is is what you might expect device information calls messages e-mails social media and and Wi-Fi networks but if you look at their websites and so here are a few
examples they can also collects system and deleted data they can access cloud storage and inaccessible partitions of the device now this is stated that is clearly beyond the average user's control and as the volume of data we hold on enough aims increases so will this next and the companies we know the UK police using which includes set of rights accessory radio tactics MSA B and all aware of how valuable they is and as 1 of them
stated if you got access to a person SIM card you've go access to the whole of a person's life they also go on to notes the sheer amount of data stored on mobile phones is significantly greater today than ever before there are also no tem poral limits to the extraction of data this is
from another piece document weeds we obtained and they show that if you choose to extract certain datatype you will obtain all data of a particular type of not just the data relevant to an investigation so all that data on a police database indefinitely and even if you are lost and whether you were happy from a book for your of data to be extracted during investigations I think it's highly unlikely you would realize the volume that the police were going to take other targets to the police that we know about are in for attainment systems in cars smart TVs and connected devices in the home and this is an extra from attack
UK reports where Marx states Head of Digital Forensic at the Nepalese which the police in London stated in January the sort of the crime scene of tomorrow will be the Internet of Things it and detectors of the future will carry a digital forensics tool kit that will help them analyze microchips and download data at the scene rather removing devices for testing now I can imagine that the evidence storage room is going to get a bit foolish they start driving in connected fridges hairdryers hairbrushes your Google homecomers is enacted and whatever else you have however that comes to walk into your home and download everything make no mention of needing a specific warrant and say the any limitations at the moment of the protections that may exist on the devices the law does not protect us and this needs to change per the so I'm going to be talking a little bit about um and open source intelligence and uh in particular as social media intelligence
because when I talked about predictive policing I identified as 2 sources of some of the data that's being used our for for predictive policing now if source intelligence is often thought of as there are often assumed to be innocuous as and there is the understanding that if our information is publicly available then each should be said for the police use now the problem is that the mono open-source intelligence there is often a social media intelligence that we share researcher segments the at now there are many ways to connect saw assortment N. can range from like the single as a single police officer who is just you using Facebook or Twitter III Duke up so you the accounts all of the victims always suspects as suspected criminals but there is also a companies that ascribing delights of Facebook and Twitter cheerleader police you money social media not socially just have like blurred the lines between public and private because obviously are we all uh we are broadcasting of use ends are on this on this platform and at the moment the police has been exploiting uh this this kind of unique space I had is the law in and they all accessing this content in a completely unregulated manner as long all eyes are the content is publicly available like for example you don't need that you don't need to be befriend an old she um old you have any of already established in connection with the suspected criminal the police all the the victim uh anything that's available to you is completely unregulated there'd the all no rules and I mentioned earlier the question of of budget restrictions and the police has by is benefiting uh hugely from this because it doesn't it doesn't really cost anything to use social media so other moments our segment is kind of like the 1st any easy step in in a police investigation i because there is no cost and because there is no oversight the the now soc means actually isn't so in a sense in the sense that it allows the police to identify the locations of people based on the parties of ILO's them she established people's connection their relationships are their recitation it allows the monitoring of protest and also try identified the leaders of various movements and you measure the person's influence the now in the UK what we know is that uh the police is a lotta using is largely using marketing products are so this is an
unannounced squat from a reports by academics have been doing research on minutes and what someone said was that a lot of stuff came out of marketing because marketing were using social media Hutchinson what people were saying about the product we wanted to understand what people were saying so it's always using it in reverse now again this is it this is not considered like surveillance device this is purely uh marketing project that they're using the and for that reason law-enforcement agencies and security agencies or as an argued that supplements are has basically no impact on privacy I but actually when at you place reveals a your location or when the content of your post I reveal what used to be considered and is still considered actually as sensitive as a private information like details about your sexual life about your health about your politics can we really minimize the impact of the police accessing this information now obviously we may not have a problem with the average reader user always a friend reading this information but Winder once were reading the information and taking actions on this information have power over us I like the police dogs you know what what what does he actually mean full right to privacy the church and that's not to say that uh that uh sorry that's not to say that people should stop by using social media but rather about what is uh bitter a rather what what kind of regulation can we put in place of so that it's also easy for the the police future axis the I the absence of regulations on on on subprime have actually already led tributes up into cases both
in you was that uh we've identified but 1 is the right services to the view of New York which is the case uh from the ACL you are where we knew doubts and uh we find out that the city of New York did say the new police departments was systematically gathering intelligence on Muslim communities and 1 of the ways they were gathering this intelligence was essentially based building social media uh accounts of the Muslims New York In the 2nd case is a company called 0 Fox so what the fuck stars is a social news media monitoring now during the uh the riots that followed the funeral Freddy gray freely Greywood's and a lot of 25 your own uh not black men who had been shot by the police so after his funeral this and had been a series of riots in UK and as you're Fox had produced a report that is shared with the Baltimore police G essentially advertised as full their social media social media monitoring tool and what the company was doing this and again like breath in social media and trying to establish a who where different actors in our in this riots and among the 19 for actors that identified 2 of them were actually leaders of the blood of martyrs movements are um actually at least 1 of them was a woman would definitely not a physical threat uh but did this is hard they were essentially labels the that the stew examples actually you I issues that again it's still the sort of the same targets its people of close its activities if people from up on a farm pouring income backgrounds that is singled out as likely criminals and it's a very telling when we realize that sort is actually 1 of the source of data that's eventually for prayer predictive policing and then again predictive policing leading to people being developed and are potentially exposed um to get to to move more police surveillance based on the fact that the also singled out as far as like a criminal not social media is a fascinating place because it's a mix between a try that's and a and a public space are as I said we are broadcasting of use publicly but then again it is a privately owned space our where we followed the rules that is set up by private companies now if we want to protect this status and ensure that like free expression and political organization can happen on the spaces we need to fully understand how much the police have been exploiting the spaces and how we can limit and regulate the use of it not outside to merely about what we can do next and
so I'm gonna briefly look at some of our initial findings we've made using Freedom of Information requests have broadly the lack of awareness by the public weak legal basis and a lack of oversight now sometimes the lack of awareness appears intentional and we
are also pleased about the extra their plans to extract data from connected devices in the home and they applied neither confirm nor deny yeah and now this is kind of a bizarre responds given the mark states is a member of the police had already said that they plan to do that in addition the UK government
Home Office replied to us saying the Home Office plans to develop skills and capacity to exploit the Internet of Things as part of criminal investigations they also said that police officers will receive training in relation to extracting obtaining retrieving data from all generated by connected devices so we went back to every police force in the UK had refused to reply to us and presented the evidence that they maintain their stance so will bring it bringing a challenge against them under the Freedom of Information Act now even as also identified the huge risks associated with predictive policing and yes in the UK we have found that this is set to increase with forces ibid using commercial tools or in-house once they developed or planning trials the 2018 there has been no
public consultation there are no safeguards and there is no oversight so when we ask the more questions about their plants we were told we were vexatious and they way respond 2 more requests so it seems like we have yet another challenge the and what about mobile phone extraction tools the here are some of the stuff
that being found out and and I say these are completely accurate because it depends and on how reliable the police force or in responding but roughly I'd say it's probably more than 93 % now as UK police forces throughout the country are extracting data from digital devices we know they plan to increase we've seen in the documents they plan to train more officers to buy more equipment and existed to see extraction as a standard part of the rest even if the devices had absolutely nothing to do with the offense and so these figures are likely to increase exponentially but in the UK no only to the police not need a warrant in documents we've red they do you know even need to notify the individual that they have extracted data for example from them a buffer all the best storing it if this is being done with our people's knowledge how an African people challenges how can they ask their data to be removed if they're found innocent turning to social media
monitoring which the please refer to as open-source research and this is jenny jerry she's a member of the House of Lords in the Green Party and next enough I 2 is a quote from and how the entry on the domestic extremism database and so if a member of the House of Lords is being subject to social media monitoring for attending a bike right and then I think it's highly likely that a large number of people who legitimately exercised their right to protest and being subject to social media monitoring now this hasn't
gone unnoticed completely although this society old and these equates from 2 as officials the 1st the UK independent revere of terrorism you notes that the extent of the use of social media monitoring is not publicly known and the 2nd is the chief surveillance commissioner who is it and this is a very strong statement for a for a Commissioner is saying that basically social media should not be treated as fair game by the police so now move on to the end of the
week or outdated legal basis
as the most of the technologies we've it ties very unclear what legal basis the police using even when we've at this this relates to mobile phone extraction so the legislation that relying on is over 30 years old and is wholly inappropriate at for mobile phone extraction this law was developed to deal with standard traditional searches the search of a phoneme can in no way be equated to the search of a person or the search of a house and despite the fact that we have repeatedly ask for a warrant this is not the case and we believe that there should be a words in place no irony in the UK but in the rest of the world so if you think that I think you all your friends have had their data extracted when arrested or your friend has been in the possession of the authorities you should be asking questions and very briefly at something on
lack of oversight a we reported in January this year that about documents are obtained by press OK with investigation and a set of rights and 1 report said that in half the cases sample sampled the police noted the police had failed to receive authorization internally the use of extraction tools poor training undermined investigations into serious offences such as murder and inadequate security practices meant there was encryption was not taking place and it even when it was easy to do and they were losing files containing intimate personal data
so why does this matter here are some key points in relation to information asymmetries clear even as explains that the police can now access far more data on our devices the average user in relation to imbalance of power it's clear they can collect and analyze sources that are beyond our control whether is publicly place sensors cameras and other devices there is also unequal access and if lawyers don't know what's been gathered they don't know what to ask for from the police all in all this because the individual at a huge disadvantage another impact is the chilling effect on political expression now I'm sure many of you uh and maybe think that the police monitor your social media but the average person is unlikely to and so if they start to know about this are they gonna think twice about joining in protesting either physically or using a hashtag and what about who your friends or if they know you attend protests that they really wants it have their data on your phone if they know the potentially that could be extracted and end up on a police database it's far easier to be anonymous face among many people in a single isolated person standing up to power that these new forms of policing we have been discussing redefine the very act of protesting by singling out each and every 1 of us from the said what we did
and many of you will be familiar with these technologies the but you know how to find out what the police are doing in the UK we've been using Freedom of Information requests we want to do this with people throughout Europe and you need to be a lawyer so please get in touch and we also want to dig into the technology that more I want someone to use a set of right you have the deal my 13 and show me exactly what has come out of that and and we want to tell lawyers and activists about these new techniques many know as I speak to you who are experts in actions the case the police do not know the police using these tools this means they don't know the right questions asked and so it's fundamental you speak to people who are bringing these cases and tell them about what they can do or what questions they should be on skills and finally we want you to also raise the debates to share our research on to critique it the thank you thank for the zeroth of to for and are there any questions in the hall yes there's 1 over there as you mentioned the problem of so when they do physics extraction from celebrate device is to get all photos all of sort maybe rather than just for the investigation needs what is the solution to that from your eyes is the technical 1 but these were computed to implement regional going to were legal world because only of the solid the mobile phone is a crucial part of you know of any criminal investigations recently so the world around solutions of I think it's by I think that the fact that there is any Lord looking at this and I was discussing can there be a technical solution or does it need to be at 1 where there's better regulation and oversight so you extract everything can you keep it for a certain period to see what's relevant and you have to delete it the trouble is we say we don't see any deletion practices and the police have publicly stated error in the media that they can just keep everything as long as they like they like data you can kind of see why but that doesn't mean they should keep everyone stays there indefinitely just in case is useful so I think that maybe tech solutions there may be legal ones I think perhaps faith together is is 1 of the answers the the next question from murder from 1 please and I'm just wondering and also also ruled immigration and for a given to the up us being sold to the UK people actually because to fight stores and the same notified of world's kind of stuff what's the argument used by the government to also that's to the people I was so I think I actually want invisible at you bear in mind is that I'm not sure most of the of the bloodletting you gaze even aware of it so I think like uh the work of intelligence uh so this is a an agency where tourism is use as the excuse of full and ever more power and especially uh rules that have become an increasingly invasive actually was policing we don't even fall in that kind of discourse because it's actually hobby talked about in UK near and the mobile Fred extractions of we've been looking at as low-level crimes and so that's like you have it could be year pub fight it could be a robbery were stuff mysterious it could be an assault say they want to use it in every case that the all the other techniques we have no idea what they're using 4 that's 1 of the problems the next question from the minute please when you say that there's a leg of laws and regulations from a full police close concerning your essence of men and data from devices side talking just about you care and all you say or do you have any examples of other countries with a better or worse I I don't know of any country that has regulation on publicly available information on social media microphone number the danger you again for a great talk in terms of a that exploitation an element that I didn't hear you talk about that like to hear a little bit more is when there are questions around who is doing the exploitation I know in the US and where researchers get around how difficult it is to get out from the fact cycling after local and state police departments is that something that you're doing in or do you have a way of addressing confusion when people don't know what agency has yeah I think actually what 1 of the things that uh data excitation program actress internationally things actually I'm looking to the connection between the private sector and and governments because obviously adenomatous the wall question of data brokers which is an industry that's hobby regulated at all that honestly know that we don't have the companies that are doing it already familiar household name I let me talk a lot more about that the government aspects of this I guess the question is again a country-by-country basis but we work in many countries that don't have any data protection and uh regulation that'll as it is this difficulty is hardly regulates the hard we limit the power of the state when you don't even have to basic education around there on data protection 189 is like the problem with companies like a hold you also hot uh hold companies accountable worries that with that with the state there is the the wall and uh the will challenge of finding the right of the right legal framework to the power that media let's and nearly talk that movement then yeah without without foyer requests we tend to go after after on so with the example of the home office saying something that the other police did not because we went through the different state bodies and and I think that there is a good example in in the states and where there's far more research done on what he's doing but they're using the same product in the UK this axiom and there a storage device for body will camera videos and the lawyer in the state said that in order to access the client his the video contains kind he had to agree to the terms and condition on axioms websites which they see than full use of if his clients video about crime scene so that's a private company having use of this video so given that we found that using in the UK we did the if those kind of turns in the conditions exist but it's a very real problem as they rely increasingly on on private companies and number 2 thank you for your work are granted audience of this thing partially from other peoples questions but it looks like we have a great way to start the process and in of taking the power back but you know the the stadium a system certainly doesn't wanna give up this much power how do you actually directly you know was the engine was the strategies for meeting of the
police or the government's give up and restore balance is a is of suit is a challenging to parliament in the slow process of democracy or what you think is the right way of doing it and I I never thing 1 works only on it saying in a bit I'm a litigator I have saying mitigations quite a weak tactic to take if you don't have the public on site and then again if you don't have parliament so we need all of them in a kennel country different means save and we wouldn't just focus on what are they different countries and like it might be better that you go down the legal Riedel that our parliamentary rated in the UK we tried all different rates say for example a mobile phone extraction in the beginning of next year we're gonna be doing a video we're going to be doing the interviewing the public and speaking to them about it we're going to be going to parliament and I've also been speaking to a lot of lawyers some hope in some cases will start because those individual cases brought by local lawyers aware also you see a lot of change like the John hack case that's 1 noise so I think we we need all different things to see what works and what states so and we have that number reject the how things little and so I have a question regarding the concerning the use of solution side of things because of the 1 aspect what's missing in your talk also and economics of the game actually because of like and Yukon you from the UK and some of the private sector has of except and also in the public domain and the images to help halt because of funds on this thing and I would of like to ask you know whether or not you think some forcible the logic system from within the police departments because the models of the world like a cost-driven aspect to rule on limit of so this is a summary all of them because you have a problem with the police force coming in because you will have to pay their friends and automated thing so especially when I'm going to the private sector which has a whole logical thing about stuff is on the cost savings and the soul of maybe it would be a nice thing 1 of which you could talk a bit about some of the world the use of sort the 1 the tend to make the electric the condiments economics of the morning to the picture when it comes to solutions of the whole thing and I was I the you you right in pointing out uh actually did in relation to the world that you compare what's happening with the NHS and and what's happening with the police because each of the the economics of of companies offering our offering policing services arise from the same situation is in need of a of doing more efficiently the degrees of the of budget cuts in the same way on the NHS is is well it being essentially privatized due to to the budget cuts and did you to Due the needs and uh that arise out from being limited the your affine again there is a similar thing was the police is when you when you're in the start then you'll more likely to rely on on technologies geology helping you work more efficiently because essentially with predictive policing the and the idea behind this is that if you know where crime wearing when crime will happen then you can focus the limited resources you have there and all sort of look at the more uh global larger picture on so I mean and organize your state advocating for enforceable forms from the police actually do have a highest mean there there is that there is a desperate need to reframe actually the narrative around hot we do policing actually pay their and then indefinitely also if you got the idea of a different perspective in a different approach to policing because I have tried to shave in a really long time since this narrative has developed all you more data on the screen resolution but actually what I didn't have that uh that time to get into in this dog is actually all the research that are showing that I use for that actually don't work like tripoli is actually basically gaslighting a lot of police officers with the figure is the part of figure that up to sharing an and suggesting all just like plain inaccurate it's not accurate to compare a city on the 1 year to you what is is becoming an end of the year so it's not even clear that uh a lot of the lot of this project or even like properly and properly functioning and I'm innocent I don't want them to function I'm not going to say that if you had better predictive policing then the problem will be solved that's not the question the question is are hard to we have what we have regulation that full the police to the differently in you into the way your commitment these it and number 4 please so thank you for your presentation and I have a question about suddenly and um my opinion assortment might violated the services of for example Twitter of Facebook and you try to cooperate with these companies to make them actually enforce there at the US at a so actually using either like the all companies that are doing as scraping on of and you right in this case by uh the the violates the terms of services of our Facebook and Twitter now and in the order of the problem is that there is a review to this and actually the uh marketing company I was talking about as being used by the UK but it's what the essentially do that differentiates the the data from our facebook and twitter so this is why it's interesting because when Facebook say are we don't sell your data are well I guess essentially actually was marketing I was marketing tool that are there to monitor to monitor what people say about products are essentially what you're doing is selling you data idea and also eliminates a delightful name all your location or things like that of whatever you be better policing publicly for example in my groups all um all public pages is something that they are going to be trying to sell to those companies and so I think you're right and maybe merely will have more to say about this I think there is a uh the committees have a role to play but at the moment I think the challenge we face is actually this the with facing where by by after chasing the data directly from the company did don't have face in the the the violence terms of services and here we waste respect innovative the some of the social media companies as we've been told the 1 of the big faces it focuses the problems of that the social media monitoring at the US border and so because there's and not knowing about that that they're looking at those issues I think once we show more more the problems in the UK or in other countries I think it would be very interesting to to look at that what's happened that happened over the past 9 independence they appear to
see how social media was used then and I I think the companies are to react until we make them at will they they they probably will meet with us and have a slightly different aspect that we have revealed in a different part of our our work that's and the intelligence agencies where gathering social media there's probably no ground breaking news but it was it was there and played factors so they will go a bit and concerned about how that was happening at but the sum the Newfoundland so the better our research the more people speaking about it I think they will engage all will find out on a on a guessing other pieces here lawfully or unlawfully and the moon please x we'll talk and I have a question on predictive policing of German authorities in last 2 years of piloted from the pre crops spread project and free states I think some and they claimed that they would never use these techniques with data on individuals but only aggregate data from like the new repeat the those of presented and they could just an additional tool in the toolbox and that if used responsibly can lead to more cost-effective policing and the by this argument or would you say that there's inevitably you slippery slope kind of path conceived to more granular data assessment or evaluation that would inevitably you know infringe on privacy rights by I I think and and and this goes back to the question of like you know a are we using policing chitons where crimes happening all who it is now committing a crime but actually I think even if we if we seek to bits even if we seek to identifying where crime is happening we still run into problems with your energy and the fundamental problem of predictive policing which is we only have data on crime that have already been reported ever or already been addressed by the police and the dead that's by sense already by they tell us if we add a few of the police in some areas then the more likely she you know further police because you did do solution of the of the users of this companies of this uh this algorithm will be leading you more what the suggestions that crime is a is happening more pretty predominantly in those areas so as we seen so far is that we fall into this uh the into this fundamental problems of discipline of other police in um of over policing across communities that are already of at least so in a sense in terms of um awarded a right to privacy but also uh this question of the presumption of innocence I think purely just having a trying to cultivate data on the Web crime is happening it's a it's not efficient policing 1st of all but uh it's also I accusing challenges are for fundamental rights well yeah and I I guess is not a great comparison that there were a lot of what they're bringing in now it's that program to assist you with a charging decision so you've got someone you've arrested due charge or not the pre-sale of course is only advisory you have to look at how busy a police station is to know how advisory is that going to be and how much is it going this way your opinion say the more you use these tools more it makes your job easier because rather than thinking where we can again areas things can happen here we can arrest with computer told us to do this so let's just do that and microphone number 3 players thank you and do you think that there any credible argument to be made for limiting the police's abilities under actually you can incorporate EU level restrictions on privacy data protection of human rights and fundamental rights and if so do anticipate that those arguments may change after breakfast said and while they're they're bringing in a GDP on the law-enforcement directive now and they're denigrated to scrap those ones pyrexic comes in will still be parts hopefully this European court of human rights but not the European Court Justice and I think there are going to be implications is going to be very interesting how they played out there still going 1 the data from Europe all they wanna a B positive Interpol their that policing operates at a different level and I think if they have to comply with certain rules so that they can play with the big boys than they probably well but they may do things behind the scenes say it depends where it works for them and that's certainly the politicians indefinite please for the part of those groups so they will have to see the we we would still use the will still rely on European judgments the force they have an accord or maybe maybe more difficult of course the Internet questions no while have number to please see you mentioned that they don't the free legal operational security and sometimes some stuff that some of the could be bound with in the last year we had made data leads all across the world live below in southwest because just to mention a few now if the the security the obstacles so by the police in Great Britain it's not unlikely that some thing will have neurons of similar kind of what kind of game using such a huge data political private information which leads me the to restore this but you know it was not made by the police and it would be made by a private company that someone will access to it I I guess it depends on what it is if it's in a database with and serious criminals and 80 the bad people then people people people they were as good they have that of information that they need to be making more secure if they live somehow databases which held also serves as a information say from people's mobile phones innocent people's pictures all that kind of thing then we might see a much wider public reaction to the tools the use and the safeguards the legal safeguards will become a come a lot quicker and then probably we will achieve and in in the way which we're trying to gain applicants there be a bigger public and our age yeah yeah OK 1 last and hopefully short question from on 1 of guidance for the talk was really to social Kaushal question how much is still abroad can can we buy 1 of the things I did I wanna and I think is a I think there was some on ebay but I know I'm not sure if they would like the right things that a couple of thousand pounds that I thing you have to actually a police force to get those ones maybe there are other types better and it is expensive but no an unattainable and the I'm trying to find universities that might happen because I think that a lot friends excuse I'm I'm hoping that they will undertake the extractions of actual starting from 1 it does things that adverbial Nelson of people in the interim what to watch this
this is not the just move it to the top
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Metadaten

Formale Metadaten

Titel Policing in the age of data exploitation
Serientitel 34th Chaos Communication Congress
Autor Blum--Dumontet, Eva
Wood, Millie
Lizenz CC-Namensnennung 4.0 International:
Sie dürfen das Werk bzw. den Inhalt zu jedem legalen Zweck nutzen, verändern und in unveränderter oder veränderter Form vervielfältigen, verbreiten und öffentlich zugänglich machen, sofern Sie den Namen des Autors/Rechteinhabers in der von ihm festgelegten Weise nennen.
DOI 10.5446/34814
Herausgeber Chaos Computer Club e.V.
Erscheinungsjahr 2017
Sprache Englisch

Inhaltliche Metadaten

Fachgebiet Informatik
Abstract What does policing look like in the age of data exploitation? This is the question we at Privacy International have been exploring for the past two years. Our research has focused on the UK where the population has been used as guinea pigs for ever more invasive modern approaches to policing. In this talk we will discuss our findings with you and avenues for change.
Schlagwörter Ethics, Society & Politics

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