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Ember at Scale

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and what the
right so I'm here to talk about member of but 1st like to
invite you all to join me on my professional network which is linked in and the but yeah
actually here to talk about and so and there's been really successful in allowing small teams to build high-quality applications in a relatively short amount of time but what would it look like it at that same framework that allows a small teams to be extremely productive enumeration on a massive engineering organization the so they might talk is number at scale as mentioned my
name is Chad hello and a step engineer at LinkedIn where I work on the gene called presentation of a structure and were primarily focused with building client-side solutions to help product products and so this is a story about thinking over the things that we consider in some of the problems that we solve along the way but 1st if before get into known using Amber at link then we foresee the 1st we need we 1st need understand where linking came from and to do so we have these go back to when I joined the company so company in 2013 and that's almost 3 years to the day actually and at that time we had about 30 600 employees and the we had about 275 million members so were at this point we're still not like a small company where actually pretty large but for anybody who's familiar with Lincoln on knows that it's a much bigger company than 30 600 employees today and we have 400 million members is so 1 of the lessons that I quickly learned when I was at I had come from a start was that any company of this size you need to have a very good product and technology balance so as I mention this is new to me because I literally wrote the jobs high train of 2011 and was able to purchase a backbone angular and replication into production at the start and so I mention this because the
1st project that I worked on was use JS fusion and I had never used these up into this point my career but not only was the world's a using GS keys I was actually working on a 12 year old system that talk to Oracle back and and this is actually the original text that that was built when all the co-founders were in every coffins living room getting the 1st version of Linked in out the door the so
many coming to link and unlike what year is this and I came from this place where I was doing a lot of things with JavaScript and I was really surprised by you know that we read I was building something engineers these so this is
quote it in a product that clearly this is by somebody that is not the job the community because we tend to reinvent the wheel about every 6 months or so but when you start thinking about this rationally it makes sense I when you're getting tens of millions of users to sign up year-over-year the technology is not a problem and you only really need to reassess the technology when it's hindering their ability to create new products and being able to iterate on existing ones so 2014 rolls around so and just this 1 year we went from 30 500 employees to 6 thousand employees so almost doubled and we also added about 60 million users on during that that that 1st year that was there so lots of people both on the supply side and on the user side group members but it came pretty clear us that it was becoming harder and harder for us to iterate but we had lot stuff in so you with any given page on lincoln . com you would see that there was why y j query back home dust JST keys and then a bunch of internal libraries that were used to kind of like cobble together of a user interface not only that we have a proper dependency management system so what it really meant was when your training new product well is we have this method call allied out namespace and what allows you to do is registering a space into a global object that's basically where you wrote products yeah yeah so in 2014 I joined the team to help reduce this complexity and unifying the tax stacks that we're using to build user interfaces it so like any other serious company out there what you end up doing is getting some type of design and then building that design in a number of frameworks just to kind of get a feel of you know how the framework works what's problems that's all for me it how does it actually attacked the problems but cost
yes highlight but a more elegantly it's always versus and reverse somebody but I think this is more of towards the benchmarking blogs that you'll see about OK let's take you know the virtual diamond benchmark it against ever and we kind of saw some of this early this morning of comparing and contrasting frameworks the so in that for some really good and it's important to the benchmarking the application or the framework that hearing-impaired but it it can't be the only thing that you consider the
so badly then on we have to really consider about how the organization really thinks about technology and how they think about building products in 1 of those things that comes to mind right off the bat is all the technology that we use that link in that use across many different our products there is centrally supported by a the is a single gene because you have various concerns so there's a thing that works on the rest framework is that the networks on databases and all of data pipelines when there's people that like me that work on clients but the idea is that if you're going to build an application you have a set of tools to build from it's always having the share infrastructure solves about 90 % of the problems that developers would have if they were to start with nothing I mean all they're really responsible for his building the product and propagation solutions is actually a really great topic Steve Jobs from late 1987 so that is talking about pitching cocoa and how it solves a lot of these common problems that no developers actually wanna think about all they wanna do is i the build a product In the analogy is basically that cocoa is a scaffolding for applications and it starts you off on for 26 instead of war 9 when you're going out to build a product and we we most definitely have a similar goal that we did is we wanna share much infrastructure as possible yeah is so because we're doing shared infrastructure less is actually more for us any and the reason for that is like we really like the holistically solve problems I want to give me an example of this internally tracking across all the applications have to be done in various on spec out where there's a schema for all tracking events it when you scale you wanna make this as as the simplest possible for developers to comply with our tracking at this scale and so what we did internally was he built a number out on 4 attractive as and when to solid your 90 % of the way they're being compliant over our tracking and you just basically have instrument your application with the event names of we're going to do tracking but things like actions happen for free Justina supplied with the the tracking key that you're doing it the yeah and then the other thing that we really haven't taken consideration is that the only change are the only constant is change this side is little backwards but yet the idea and so there's multiple levels so this and this is true about many things in software and life but but the thing that we really concentrated on was that we allow people to move around from team to team in the organization and is really great for people's careers has yet to work out very interesting problems are the problems that you're most interested in but it does come at a cost when you don't have shared solutions to problems and this is very much the case when all of the clients and stuff I'd worked on 3 teams in the 1st like you're and have that I was at least in trying to figure out what want to do and this is clearly a problem the then the other thing is that JavaScript community is kind of crazy and web development in general quick crazy as I alluded to before that things change quite quite often is so we wanted something that evolved over time but made certain guarantees about stability in EPI 1 releases were going actually happened on and so we end up i taking and we think that several lines how Lincoln thinks about building products and how we think about managing technology this however allows you to scale because you have shared solutions and conventions to solve common problems
so Anbar provides you with enough scaffolding that start you off on floor 23 instead of 4 6 but your probably and still need is also pretty interesting problems at the infrastructure layer is now and what talk about those interesting problems that we face and how we attack them in the hopes that we can take these ideas and still them into the community and maybe Bill force 24 25 so that we as a community to have shared solutions to these problems so can you couldn't talk a
little bit this morning about the initial render performance and and this was something that we thought quite a bit about before even started building a amber application at then yeah reading I feel like we should be able to leverage the server to help solve some the problems in initial renders on a walk through and how we did that
that so we treated this piece of infrastructure called the base case render and it otherwise known as the BPR are not PBR but you have no idea on it's responsible for serving the index set HTML of the number of but not only is a responsible for serving of index that and know we look at the base page renderer as a performance and can enhance their on top of points and applications and the reason why we look at it as an enhancement on top of client side applications is at the BPR could you run into 3 different types of modes it runs in the novel mode which is probably the mode that most people are familiar with it's like what you how you would normally build number replication re have an index that HTML come down for me the server Aleksandr CDN and inside of that index additional yes and script tags the script tag block the CDN again you get some assets that once was as system but back the porcine valve is are good in your application of you then go back to the server to fetch some data and finally finally come back to your application and you go render the screen yeah so that's the of and then the service I rendering which unlikely go too much into our because some kind of basically talked about that this morning but we do have the ability to run the BPR in SSR mode as well the last mode that we are I can run the base phase rendering and is this mode public by
nautical will spend a little bit of time to talk about because I think this is an idea that I'm not a lot of people are talking about ways that we can leverage some the infrastructure that's been built for the term big pipe was actually coined by Facebook in 2010 so it this year this ideas like 6 years old on but we need to get creative at we need to get creative and power going to build these applications in the future and I think this is a good way of doing but anyways dog would be quite actually means is that you're just going to keep that HTTP connection alive hearing a chunking code that index that you're going to chunking code that HTML but you're sending out the browser the and so this is actually part of the HTTP 1 . 1 specification it's Benin browsers for a very long time and so they give some visualization of what chunking coding does for you is what when you do on a server processing for like what's say on normal website there's 2 ways that you can I think about rendering or sending out and exploration now you do what is known as store and forward where you're just building up the document in memory and then once the document is completely 7 the fully materialize document down to the browser the other 1 is chunked encoding which is if your processing and every time the processing of chunk on your actually stream in and out of the the the browser once it's ready so this gives you the ability of light this concept of a stream string down here now to the browser and so this is a little website there anything like this this is each HTTP streaming is keeping the connection alive the and so we know we know
about short encoding or having a better understanding of that of a house in this we have a diagram that's like this this is kind with a high level architecture of of what we're doing at Lincoln and so we have the browser so we have the be and the actually has a version of the emperor inside of it which is the same memberOf that is running in the browser and not talk about how we have those guarantees later but just for analysis and application running in the browser that's opinion that's in the server and then often side we have an API Server but so when a request comes in to buy from the browser but it goes directly to the DPR in this case we're asking for Lincoln profile 1 2 3 and there were doing and so what happens then is the BPR will almost immediately returned with the head of the document and so inside of an art not sure if you can read it but it is like the start of the HTML tag it has like any of your CSS that's inside of that the head tag and then any script had any scripts that you're a download so if you use an embassy alive it's the vendor JRC at various and so while you're doing this on the browser can you know make the CDM requests to get those assets before you know close up connection so we call this the other terms for this type of technique is early flexion what it means is that you know what early so you can start downloading acids in parallel it so after recent down the initial chunk of HTML and we actually use the fast to visit API inside of the emperor we say hey and bereft of what you to visit profile 1 2 3 and In doing so it's the rappers going to or out to profile 1 2 3 and some things are gonna happen it's gonna probably want to try to make some API requests so when it does may connect API request we want to actually take that request in proxy that 2 or API so and we actually want do a little bit more of performance work in this area of by parallelizing I'm more work so that I can artists
who is somewhere here I actually wrote this thing called prefetch and whatever prefetch does is that it introduces a new book into your out and what that what is is that non-blocking on and when the men blocking is in the traditional and replication you have a model of any return a promise out from the model but it's gonna wait until that promise resolves to move on to maybe you have nested rods it'll move on to the next round of the same thing if you make an API call the API call come back and then move on and draw the state forward the with ever prefetch you just call the rats and so
this is from a tool that we have internally called the call tree and so the top 1 if you can see on this is running the application inside of node and these are the the request of the API server is receiving the top 1 you can see all the calls are done in serial where the bottom 1 has and the prefetch installed and were able to paralyze some of the work that we want actually do so the saves this processing time on the server and it will also save you time on the client so
that being said we our come back over with the data the EPI and ID returns with the data and we re enter the and replication because we're using promises you could always have like a duck then on the end of the promising so it means that you actually have to go back and the amber application to resolve any potential pending promises and so this is like normal amber stuff but the same time we tee off in what we tee off with is the thing you could call the data led In the data Let has all the API on request information inside of this data would so it's all of the data that you're going to need on the initial request when you're and replication boots up it so we have a little bit we have a little library on the client that acts kind of like a network proxy it captures all the stream responses in when the unwrapped tries to attempt to make a request we match up with the stream response the now you're Amber application makes no ATP Ajax requests when you initially will the app and so what we see all with this is we get 1 to 2 seconds on the initial render our by embedding the API request into the index . html it
so I do think I I took the amber fast-food server and I was able to kind of do this type of pattern but I do not recommend that you put in production as a complete proof of concept but the end goal is you the end goal is that you'd be able to something like
this where you ever fast through back resource discovery and all this would do is wrongly amber application on in here in the data center and embed the index of embed the data into the index of HTML so I really think like this is a pattern that we can all build around and have shared infrastructure around but we've been doing this and production of a think like 6 months at the other problem that we kind of had was we need to serve the application so look merely from announced may also give like a really great talk last year about deploying a serving applications and I like the kind of of share our approach now that you kind of have this complication of what you're doing server-side rendering so how do you actually serving out that way and how do you actually to point out that needs on a server component you can't just rely on a CD and and so the goal of
a bit more detail on a show like what is actually happening inside the BPR and I wanna talk about this because I think this is a really good way on how old you can leverage existing technology will be at like a python stacker rail stacked on basically any other language that is a node and how you can leverage things like fast and so we went with what is called a sidecar architecture and this was kind of champion by Netflix they've done a lot of work in this area and I think they have some libraries that light to do this and what it but allows you to do is write your main process so we're existing application side by side of the new technology that you wanna use and so how this works is another in into more detail is basically you can use both these technologies at the same time the so what happens is when you when a request comes in to the BPR it has this thing called the base station controller the bass fish controller is responsible for it's like a catch our our star out there is this going to talk to this library I called the renderer what the renderer does it takes to request any calls into this other library called the Process Manager and associates that request to unknown process if you if you guys were in Felix's talk about how old electron works it's very similar to how electron works so the process manager is going to spawn on a renderer process or node process which inside of it you have an amber renderer and good and you're going to talk to this font process over what is called an ITC stream or interprocess communication stream and so this allows you to send messages between these 2 processes to in the sodium is going to issue some requesting like the AJAX request is so what is actually happening inside of the amber renderer inside the application is we write initialize that's lots of the Ajax method that tells us that knows about how to make a proxy API requests to our server so like it seemed was to the user and they we just at build time we're able the recent bill that does the swapping so we talking between all the the no process standard JVM process the majority of time all of em wants to do is just talk to the guy service so it's going to make a bunch of a carrot like it had in the last diagram and we are going to re enter into the and replication to pet resolving it any promises but then finally we have to return and so this is kind like life cycle the BPR in are much more detail but I really think like I mentioned before it's a a good way to leverage existing technology so all of our networking libraries are all in the jobless space but we wanna use sort of like the fast API is in the notes side
and so finely deployments and we don't have as I said we don't actually put the index additional into CDN and what we do is we have ob build infrastructure that basically when you're building your application of India China like that some code we run the embassy alive build and at the end you have like a normal embassy assets we publish those 2 a CDM but then internally we have a system to kind of associate your client-side application with a BPR instance the and so we what we do is we take the the assets from the embassy alive build we Jesus film up and then we place them inside of of the yard and the BPR is the actual deployable units for us so the BPR is actually share piece of infrastructure at LinkedIn armpits currently being ported to a library so that you can use the shared idea across all the and applications at Lincoln this is kind of like what we're striving for is and I can talk about as DA and so more particularly any device that is going around the 8 and so we have done a lot of work in this area of the 1 of the largest problems that we had was getting visibility into what Android phones are doing or be a anything that's running being and so while the cult profiler and the timeline tools are really great the samplers I which means that they're gonna look at you know many different things and and kind of give you a general picture of the world but we really want to have a high level certainty that we were moving performance in the right direction and so I work with Chris Sullivan who is on the and reporting on but it also works at least in our so he created this library called from tracing that basically can launch Frome with all of the viate flags and jobs replaced and these are giving you very detailed numbers of what is actually going on in the jobs that Brenda decided from or basically anything from India and while you can do this by yourself in that I mean this is I think how Chris normally works by 2 and not everybody can like parts what is coming out of the logs and if so what he did was that it passes over the lodging gives you a much more readable format of on things like how long did you spend in functions follow undertaken initial render on CPU usage and so all these are metrics if you really wanna know when you're develop your application is this kind of help us identify some areas around like skip script the vowel and on how long it's going to actually take a circuit initial render the quantum actually has a similar library and this call telemetry and while it's great that has a lot more benchmarks and we currently have with from tracing but it's all written in Python and what we wanna do is create a tool that allowed our developers who primarily work in Java script to be able to iterate on that and add new benchmarks to crunch tracing and that's we would also like to take like many contributions for having a generic set of benchmarks as this is that have anything to do with members specifically but it is a really great tool for partner applications so I think in
2016 there's a lot of interesting problems of a lot of them were kind of enumerated in the keynote talk this morning but how really do off-line power we gonna do service I rendering with like rehydration on how do we get to like 50 FR at 60 fps animations and art and mobile devices but I think we as a community we can continue this all these types of problems and elegant scalable ways of linking is climbing the same out with all of you ever really excited to be part of this community
so I was a say 1 more thing that I'm really hoping that 0 yeah catches on but they do not and so we built in an
application of this is using all the infrastructure that I just talked about I think the link and outcomes such as I'm sorry for the download app interstitial of
based on the bunny on Twitter genital be my question is any pull the data out of the indexation award is wasted union so I don't know you're able to see on this slide there and so we have the getting pulled so on what there is is that we in fact when we flushed the head of the document we have a little library let's call that the DPR client and when you are flushing out the script tags on the browser it has a reference to the library so it calls like the PR guy you know had resources something like that and all those things it cued up into a big on map on the client and so that ever application also has code inside of this kind of no any race and q that's probably gonna be there when I boot yet it the and and
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Schreib-Lese-Kopf

Metadaten

Formale Metadaten

Titel Ember at Scale
Serientitel Ember Conf 2016
Autor Hietala, Chad
Lizenz CC-Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 Unported:
Sie dürfen das Werk bzw. den Inhalt zu jedem legalen und nicht-kommerziellen Zweck nutzen, verändern und in unveränderter oder veränderter Form vervielfältigen, verbreiten und öffentlich zugänglich machen, sofern Sie den Namen des Autors/Rechteinhabers in der von ihm festgelegten Weise nennen und das Werk bzw. diesen Inhalt auch in veränderter Form nur unter den Bedingungen dieser Lizenz weitergeben.
DOI 10.5446/34696
Herausgeber Confreaks, LLC
Erscheinungsjahr 2016
Sprache Englisch

Inhaltliche Metadaten

Fachgebiet Informatik
Abstract Ember has primarily been known for allowing small teams extremely productive to ship ambitious applications to the web, what does this look like when you scale it out to hundreds of engineers and for a web property that has over 400 million users? In this talk I will show how we shipped our first Ember application and how we addressed everything from tooling to performance.

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