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Putting 8 Million People on the Map

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but I admire have your attention please it yeah yeah it it yeah I mentioned his titles of which enabling Internet and has been used a major developments in different laws if the the more of this is evening at this point so Good evening everybody yeah really comparing what my name is Toronto and I am proud of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team and the Vice-President the organization and Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team is were really a bunch of OpenStreetMap mappers and so were OpenStreetMap mappers who have decided to focus on the humanitarian applications of OpenStreetMap and so I'm here to tell you a little bit about what we do and the tools that we do and I'm here to thank everybody in this room for making it possible because it's all based on open source and everybody has helped build this open source community has made everything that we do possible so thank you in the beginning of thank you at the end you for sure the so imagine what it would be like if you live in a town that had no map data you could never look up where doctor was you could never look up where you had to go through and to take your kids to the hospital you the city that you lived in how would they plan for disasters what would happen if a disaster hit your city and you have no map to figure out how you can get out for an evacuation route tens of millions of people live in places where there are no maps not just for map data or something like that but they literally are nowhere on a map and so when they're struck by disaster they face difficulties that we really can't imagine so what if you could fix that would if you could go away online and you could start to enter the information about which the the things that were important to you you could put your home on there you could draw in the streets of your neighborhood you could start marking lands landmarks and locations that were important to you you could start dealing with infrastructure issues like power lines and radio towers and waste dumps and standing water and
swamps and what is true million people were doing it with you all around the world and not only doing it for their towns but doing it for
towns around the world and that's what OpenStreetMap this OpenStreetMap is a worldwide collaborative effort to create a free and open online map of the entire world it's open it's edible and the data that you create will be free forever for anybody
to use so the organization that I work for them most of you probably already know about OpenStreetMap but the organization that I work for is called Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team and the spoken in this talk is going to focus on OpenStreetMap so humanitarian applications and how we in particular do it on we use we create 3 open source tools that basically are the foundation of making it possible for millions of people around the world come together and map places that don't have maps yet and help during emergency response and disaster preparedness and this diagram that's up here is on I put this in here because this is what we call our mapping document so about 10 or 11 years ago when we were starting to think about this project called OpenStreetMap from the very beginning you had always been envisioned that this would have meant in applications and so this is literally the founder of our organization when he was sitting down and jotting out how this would work this is the document that he came up with and you can sort of see you can tell it's a little dated because there's no drones the satellites there's airplanes and at the time kites people use kites Ferreira imagery and still do today but the other thing that the gentleman who who of created this document likes to remind us is that document everything even when you think it doesn't matter because 10 years later we can go back and look at the
napkin that was the founding of our Organization and everything we do is based entirely on open source technologies and when I was putting this slide together I said this is going to be great and collect together all the open source packages that we rely on every single day and on the throw all those icons and graphics up on this slide and it became are clear pretty quickly that that just was not can't be possible there's way too many open source packages that we rely on the way too many open source libraries that rely on it just wasn't possible to to get them on a slide in a reasonable way so I can put the big ones up here from most of OpenStreetMap is based on PostgreSQL well and then we use Post-its that makes it geodata where on that we use for rendering but we have products that we write a note JS and pylons and Django and then there's a couple of editors of the and then I have 1 up there that makes no sense and that stop and that I can and I only put that in there because just to remind us that literally everything we do is based on open source software we would even be able to begin to dream of a collaborative online map if the people who were developing the initial what became the Internet work generating open-source software that native run and that's the only thing that makes it possible for us to be here today
so what is how do so to make all this happen and primarily what we do this training so we did training and we mobilize volunteers are this picture is of a training that we were doing at a university in Indonesia and we primarily focus on what we refer to as the global south primarily because that's the place where there's no maps the global south as suffers from the lack of any sort of bacteria especially open and free map data so if we're going to focus our efforts we tend to focus on those areas because the people who are going to benefit the most the people who do the mapping the people who create the map data that we use for humanitarian relief work they're generally mapping from whole or from school or more and increasingly the mapping from work as part of map at times this is an informal map at time at some it's called green school and it's in Bali Indonesia and you can see it's just a matter of getting some people together with some laptops do some training and OpenStreetMap start to focus on some areas that are that are missing maps come and just again to give you a brief idea of what we do this is some that is free that's Freetown in Sierra Leone so this is from when we were mapping for the bowl crisis but again there was just no map data the vast majority of the population that they had to be concerned about there were no references anywhere to those people where they lived that's a how to get there anything along those lines In our high density a million people live in Freetown and you can see this sort of are in In the settlement sort a grow-op informally there's no street names there's no House numbers there's nothing like that so the process that we go through when we're doing our mapping is we're looking at at satellite images like this and then we're tracing buildings the so this is what it looks like after somebody has done a mapping and they trace roads they treat buildings and you can't really tell what the yellow lines of there are offences than slides and we call this digitization so we just digitize this aerial imagery and
then when that's all over what we actually end up with vector data and now this is data that we can plug into GIS systems although the humanitarian organizations usually have a GIS department so they can pull the data straight out of OpenStreetMap they can use 1 of our tools to get the data out of OpenStreetMap if they don't have a lot of skills and GIS but once this data gets factorized now we can start to do things like population analysis of flood inundation analysis you can start to figure out how many people you need to evacuate where you can evacuate 1 2 and that basically you know have a much more effective response to to whatever the disasters
is going on we don't also we don't only mapped remotely although it's a large portion of what we do we tend to map remotely in generate what we call base map which is roads and buildings and then we like to do field work where we go into the locations if it's possible so we happen in response to crisis and that almost all remote mapping during a crisis nobody has time to walk around with paper and pencil and write down exactly what's happening or where these buildings are but we also try and map before there's a disaster we tend to know where the floods event happen we know where the cholera outbreaks generally tend to happen we know where malaria is killing hundreds of thousands of people a year so we wanna get in there and we wanna start doing this mapping before a major disaster happens this on the street people are out and they are I think that's also Indonesia on the 2 people on the left and the right they're using a product called field papers and the gentleman in the middle looks like he's recording GPS points on use of GPS unit that he can upload later but the people with the paper have a printout of the aerial imagery or they might have a printout of the vectorized it's hard to tell but they're a walk around the neighborhood of a walk around the city and now they're gonna start filling in all of the data that we couldn't fill in from aerial imagery when mapping from aerial imagery I don't really have any idea what the buildings are used for and know if it's a school I don't know if it's police station hospital pharmacy I don't have any of that information so this is where we go out and we train people who are local to the community and how to do OpenStreetMap mapping and now they're walking around the streets collecting all of that information typically it's a partnership for we might have already base maps for them so they already have the building footprints and roads all they have to do is go around and take notes the other big advantage that happens with this is we can start to get what we call administrative boundary data and a lot of what happens in countries that we work our is based on what we know you know typically they might call at the word level you might call it like the neighborhood level or something along those lines but that's also something that's impossible for us to map from the aerial imagery and so that's also kind of data that they collect when they're out there walking
around the 1st them and talk about so is what we call our task manager and this is really the you know this is the heart and soul of what we do this this is what we use to organize thousands of people online and get them focused on the mapping that needs to be done and so this tool great takes you define a geographic area in this case it's another part of Indonesia on in this case it's it's a part of Indonesia and this tool I define my area of interest and then this tool breaks up into work units so that people wherever they are all around the world can check out 1 of these work units on their typically about the size that you saw when I showed you the the Freetown image that's about a typical work unit there might be 50 or 100 buildings in network unit and if you have a little bit of experience mapping you can probably get it done in under an hour the other thing this tool lets us do is it such priority areas so that's sort of large orange part in the middle is a priority area in other words we need base map for all of this but if you could please start in this priority area that's a place where it's been identified that we really need the information as fast as possible but you can see others a lot of squares the which means that nobody has started mapping there there are a fair number of squares that our orange which means somebody has made a 1st pass and so when we do our mapping it's usually a two-step process somebody checks out of you way does all mapping marks that they've mapped at and then a 2nd person comes along and checks out that same unit revert back reviews all the mapping that they've done itself any buildings that they've missed maybe reviews the road to the tracks of past that they've mapped in just to make sure that the tag writer whatever is polish it up a little bit if need be and market Green as validated and this is a pretty important step and it's also 1 of the most challenging steps but when you know that people are relying on this data to try and save lives are it makes a difference that we can give them a pretty high confidence level in the data that we're shipping them so this tool letting us have at least 2 sets of eyes and everything and track what's been validated versus what hasn't kind makes a big difference when the ship this our and people asking us and you know how which a confidence level in this and if that's all green consumer confidence level is pretty high and if it's all on Jenkins states had a 1st past the other thing that this task manager lets us do is let us sort of control what their mapping so that we can get different sorts of mapping going on over the same area and not have to worry about conflicts so I might very well set up a task that is approximately the size I would make much larger squares and then I might say this is only about roads and then the people were checking those task words out all they have to do is worry about tracing roads task where's the size of probably pretty good for building schools buildings take a lot longer than that but the point is we can have 2 sets of people working on exactly the same area with no worry about overlapping the worry about conflicts on this tools written in Python and uses the pyramids framework but we also use aqua committee for the database access standard there is a tool called GIS all committee that makes the the sequel committee are aware of GO related data so this is what happens this is this is a town in Sierra Leone col lected you and went could do was sort of turning out to be the epicenter of the people epidemic that happened a few years ago and so if you took a look at this town on the map and this is an OpenStreetMap copy of it but you can look i'm just about any map today and you can look up when do when you can see that it's gonna look just about like this and it looks like a medium medium to small-sized village as far as you can tell from the map data this is actually a city of 250 thousand people so what I suggest that there's people who just are never on any maps this is exactly what I'm talking about there's 250 thousand people and they're at the epicenter of the Ebola epidemic and there's no geographic data there's no vector data that anybody can work with to start doing all the stuff you have to do when indefinable need to go on the houses where people were sick figure out who's in the houses around it you need build was sent out disinfection teams needs to all sorts of work so this is 1 of the areas that we mapped from as part of a verbal response and now you can see this is what we're going to look like before and this is what what could you looked like after and you can see that in the thank you know and it's impressive it's also impressive when you look at the number of people who do this this was 244 volunteers working on this project and then map 90 thousand buildings in 5 days contains an amazing amount of water and thank
you this is my mouth Guinea also part of our goal project this is another 1 where the emphasis the important part for me when I look at this slide is this is 68 contributors and you can sort of see as these units come in you can kind of see how they match up with the squares that you saw in a task manager and that's kind of a side effect of what happens when your mapping these grid units but 20 thousand buildings 68 people 29 hours this was another pretty incredible map in the forest and what we don't just map when there is a price is either so this is of Salaam in Tanzania and this was a much longer project they have found flooding problems they also have problems with wastewater but you know there's a lot of open source and so keeping track of where water goes where water stands and the best ways to start getting water out of the populated areas is a pretty important thing this now is probably the best map of alone that's ever existed we probably created the best map of West Africa that has ever existed in history as part of a mapping project but this is for sure the best MAP apparel so long as ever existed and this has a fear of few this is a project that we did part of what we try and do is remote mappers do are based mapping forest and there what really make are project successful but in every possible case we want to go into the communities and build a mapping community there too so this particular mapping project was we went in and I think we spent 6 months training 160 university students in OpenStreetMap mapping and then like you saw in the earlier picture they took field papers and they took GPS units and they took their phones and they went through the slums of our us a lot and then they map that for the next 6 months and I'm that's a pretty credible project theory are called for Romani Correa and now they're stand up alone organization that works without us at all anymore it's a matter of fact that same organization is now helping us map Mozambique that the neighboring the neighboring country for that so
the I'm not so our task manager tool the other function that it does is it breaks these things up into units that you have to map and then it integrates with the actual editing tools that you can use to edit OpenStreetMap and it'll turn that were computed over to the editing tools which we don't right so OpenStreetMap is a huge ecosystem of software packages that is only exists because of the open source community in open data we wouldn't have any of these tools to work with if it weren't for Open Source communities and Open Data community so these are 2 different tools of the tool and the upper part of this picture is the most advanced tool that you can use to edit OpenStreetMap and it's called Johnson & Johnson based application stands for job job OpenStreetMap and this is of and which 1 the best applications I've ever used it is almost a full-blown GIS application itself although that's not what is intended to be there are things that you can do in jobs and that you can do in some other GIS packages but to me though it's the most intuitive application of revenues so once you get past the UI little bit the sum UI issues but once you get past that this this continually surprises me on the small things that the people who work on that also ran into that I run into when I mapping and they've done all kinds of tiny little things that make you mapping go much better on the 2 the tool that shown in the lower part of this photo this is ah entry-level tool and this is a browser-based application here suggest it's written in JavaScript on and it's not quite as powerful as jazz in which you can do all the humanitarian mapping you wanna do right in your web browser with this tool pistols caller ID from the initials of the original developer of and this is what most people start on if you wanna start getting OpenStreetMap the best way to start is jump into jobs and go to a 5 minute tutorial and you know how to do humanitarian mapping because it's just not that difficult that essentially drawing squares and
lines this gives you a little bit of a sense this is this a heal zone in Africa which is some sub-Saharan along the west you can see we have from a lot of projects but these are what the footprints look like from our tasking manager so all of this red that you see a lot of them are collapsed because you spend so many but all of this red you see was a project area at 1 point in time in our task manager and so you can see we covered a fair amount of West Africa in detail we've done some central Africa in a little bit more detail but you can also see that there's huge portions that are as yet unmapped and if you don't see a red if you don't see of red coverage on the chances are they're not on the mass so there's a lot left to do the but it's not for me actually 10th of this and the next tool that we work with that we write as an open-source tool tools run get how as are all of our website and a lot of our marketing materials and that sort of thing but this the next tool that we that we really rely on is what we call a expert tool because Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team we where a lot of hats so we try and work with the crowd to get these things knocked out so that the people who were on the ground doing the responding have the map data that they need I'm at the same time we're working with about civic organizations and local governments and ad hoc relief groups people with no GIS training whatsoever so to try and make it much easier for them to use OpenStreetMap data we write what we call a expert tool and this expr or tool is very easy to use you draw box over an area that you have an interest in and then along the left hand side you can select what's important to you so you might that be or you might just not have bus stations and things like that but you might be super concerned about pharmacies and clinics of aid stations that sort of stuff so you can get an expert of the data out of OpenStreetMap just about anybody can get an expert in this state out of OpenStreetMap and then we can output in a variety of formats so we output it so it can go directly into a common GPS device we generally put those sorts of exports out when there's a disaster response because disaster response people are showing up at the scene and they can load the common device with the best available map data which is out of OpenStreetMap on and they a note on the Android devices and soon enough ability easily loaded on there I West type
devices so just can't give you a sense this is where it goes in a lot of people this is somebody who is I can't quite remember all this is from Haiti this is from Haiti in 2010 which was when our organization got founded that was really the 1st application of collaborative mapping for disaster relief and so this is exactly what's happening here our genome and has the the latest image for Garmin devices and there's a line of devices waiting for him to load that data on and then they get handed out to relief workers the so this is there was an earthquake in the Paul last year as I'm sure you heard on and this is a success story in a number of fronts for us because this story was we you know there was an earthquake there was also an earthquake in the power law in 2010 and 1 of my colleagues are Dr. number with AKI realized after that happened that they were hamstrung by the lack of map data available to them in that 2010 response and so he decided that he wasn't gonna let that happen again that this was possible to do people can get together and map they done Haiti there's no reason that we can't get together and do this ahead of time for the power because we know that there's going to be more earthquakes in the path and so on now must set up what is called Katmandu Living Labs i in cooperation with the World Bank funded them for the 1st few years and he got sort of the Center for Advanced Technology going in Katmandu and 1 of the major focuses was mapping so he spent years building his local mapping community mapping the Katmandu valley and then when the earthquake hit in 2015 almost the entire Katmandu Valley had already been mapped by now armor and his OpenStreetMap mapping team the nice part was it wasn't my spot but part of the problem was they had only done the Katmandu Valley and we had mountainous regions that were equally affected by this so this was an opportunity for them to use the data that they prepared in advance so the Katmandu Valley response had the data they need that allowed us to do our remote mapping work in the more outlying regions and in the mountains come with that particular project we had to just start with where people lived that was the very 1st pass was they were not sure where people actually lived when it came to some of these mountainous regions and parts that were not in the valley itself so we did a 1st pass for all we did was fine population centers and we just circle them and as soon as we got that on we ship that data out and then we started doing additional passes were now we were doing roads other key part for this particular response was we also need to define bridges and dams because after an earthquake when the bridges go out now you have a logistics problems and if you break a day and nite gesture worry about what happens downstream the landslide the other thing that happens is a landslide a Walker River and now you have to worry about flooding what happens when that river finally crests over that of
landslide so not that I'm not my and his team got to work they pulled out the data from the OpenStreetMap and this is a picture it's kind hard to tell them there where 2 different kinds of fatigues This is the Canadian Armed forces and the Nepalese Army along with 2 people from now must Katmandu living labs working with the map data that they had created for the
Katmandu Valley and this is also a Canadian armed forces used all of our data and this is where they passed out all of the responders when they were flying people over to do the response work and you can sort of see on the on the left-hand side you know the data gets used in other ways besides just maps the some 8 thousand volunteers came together to help map during a Paul it was by far the biggest response and probably 1 of our most successful responses yeah the 3rd tool that we
rely on is what we call Open aerial map and this also came into play in Katmandu in particular the the so most of the remote mapping we do is going to be based on this aerial imagery from an aerial imagery it depends on who you get it from but it's usually a little bit aged from which works out OK and an earthquake situation because we sort of need to know what it looked like before the earthquake but at the same time we also need to know what it looks like right now and so open aerial map is the 3rd tool that we developed this is a node JS application and it's designed to collect aerial imagery from drones from whatever you're taking aerial imagery with drones balloons kites flying over aircraft whatever it is we can put it all into open aerial map and now open aerial map can make that an index of that available to anybody who wants to find out where the best imagery as they can find out when it was taken what the resolution is it's next in its next phase will also make it federated so that you can be working with the data locally and if and when you get a connection it'll start to sink its data from what other people have contributed and from what you've contributed to that your particular station of so drones there were a huge of huge used to us in a number of these things it's drones so this is this is Doris along again and so these are 2 drones that were donated by some sense like these are called EB drones and these are probably the top of the line drones they get used for imagery and its so it's when the places where were still still developing open-source tools to replace some of the proprietary tools but these tools are amazing and we trained as I said we trained 160 university students and you can see kids are fascinated by everybody's fascinated by when you bring these
drones out and the drones are capturing imagery that just really is possible to get from satellites we can get a much more timely fashion and we can get a much higher resolution for this slide says minimal cost I would phrase that relatively minimal cost these drones themselves are pretty expensive if you buy the off the shelf EBI's granted you getting a top-of-the-line line drawn with you know high precision GPS ground stations for geo rectification later but so they're still not inexpensive but compared to paying for satellite time paying for satellite imagery way less expensive and now the fact that these are in Dar es Salaam there now an asset for the Romani career people to use they can drive around with the drones and they can go to other villages in other cities and they can run missions out they can run flight missions out there and then they can collect that drone imagery gather and then with the competent open aerial map so now when somebody needs to map someplace that's not Dahl's so they can look at open aerial map and they can see what sort of other
images available and this is what open area map looks like it's kind of color coded so you can sort of tell the density of aerial imagery that's available for a particular area but this is not a lie demonstration but you can drill down into fairly small tasks squares on that task words but fairly small units to figure out exactly where the which the best imagery is even if you're a very small localized area and it gives you a preview of the imagery over there on the right hand side None of that astronomer tree that all looks like Landsat imagery to me on but this is what this tool about cataloging imagery from whoever is collecting the so that brings us to our 8 million people that we put on the map and then a billion people that we put on the map is through this project that we call missing maps and the missing maps project was founded by my organization Humanitarian OpenStreetMap t but it was also funded by the American Red Cross the British Red Cross NSF UK and now we've added cocoa energy in the Netherlands Red Cross in the Clinton Health Initiative and this slide really talks about you know why I do the work that I do because these are the organizations they're asking us to do this mapping these organizations that fund dust and these are the organizations that fund our field projects to try and get these mappings skills out into the communities I should've the red crosses are now funding to the tune of around a half a million dollars in quacker do the town that we mapped out the 250 thousand people they're gonna find out Centre for mapping and GIS excellence in bracket you now and they're going to build that out for 2 years and then that's to be a place where people can come and learn how to do mapping learn how to use drones learn how to use GIS software it'll be a place for government officials and community leaders to come together to those people will be able to go out and provide services to local governments and things like that and it's all add up part of his missing maps project because these are the organizations that come to us and say hey look OpenStreetMap is always the best dataset when we show up that's always true they always turn to OpenStreetMap 1st I'm primarily because we have the most data but secondarily because the data is open and they don't ever have to worry about who to contact to get it or what the licenses are any restrictions like that they know they can show opens air OpenStreetMap they can do an extracted the data and they can get to work and then they contact us and they tell us where that data needs to be improved where they tell us what that data's totally lacking because there just is no OpenStreetMap data for and then we start setting up our projects in our some are areas of interest to get the rest of that that the out so it was dismissing maps project that it put that 8 million people on humanitarian OpenStreetMap team is probably put 10 billion people on the map but the missing maps project for sure we know have mapped areas that cover the state million people and this is just a heat map of where we do all our work this is a combination of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap team and the missing maps project that we started last year and you can see we've covered a lot of effort and a lot of Andalusia and a lot of Southeast Asia but there's a lot of places that are covered yet so there's still a lot of work to do this represents about 120 million map edits from 15 thousand contributors and a thousand projects on our task manager and we've done it was surprisingly not as many people as you would think right so 8 thousand 500 people altogether have contributed to these projects over the years and so are challenges next are to develop the tools and outreach to get more 85 thousand 850 thousand or a million people doing this humanitarian mapping and that's it I'm here just think you know that this is possible without you fuel this 1 tonight that was the none of this is possible without the open source community it doesn't matter what packages contributed to how we contribute a documentation URI whatever it is you do building the open source community in mates applications like this possible and it just wouldn't be possible if a word for everybody in this room and everybody around the world who supports open source software and open-source tool for theft all right so you have any questions yeah are you interested in mapping over historical defense you know that's a good question and OpenStreetMap in general we are built on OpenStreetMap class more and we are OpenStreetMap community members 1st and foremost and so openstreetmap has a bit of a philosophy of mapping what's currently going on right now what's the situation on the ground right now but we do map historical objects like ruins and castles and things like that but there's another project called open history map I think it's called Open history map it just gets way more complicated when start having to worry about that when we add the next dimension of time so it's a challenge for us to because we map damage areas and we map on internally displaced persons camps and so we have to work and life cycle of that data to go back and review it and see if it's still an IDP camp or see if it's been rebuilt so it's a challenge for us because that's often what we get asked a map is damage areas IDP camps and so it comes up pretty often but it's awfully hard for us to do and OpenStreetMap in general is much more focused on what happened what what what is like on the ground right now in this question thank you thought about doing the very 1st consonant the validation of the very 1st class and then an area that have this then the computer has machine learning yeah we have we tried in the computer vision and there are numerous university projects that that like to try to computer vision and this kind of mapping and you know truthfully it comes out at about the best I've ever seen that was done by a private company who I'm assuming spent a lot of money and doing the best that they could do was about 75 % accuracy just on places where there's the population so they were having they were and even attempted to do buildings and roads they would just trying to figure out where buildings were in general and it was still only about 75 per cent accurate and it broke down pretty bad once you got out into this extremely rural areas where it could not figure out you know these are farm subsistence farm so it's all spread out on you know they could tweak the algorithms but it just wasn't enough is certainly not enough high enough quality data for OpenStreetMap OpenStreetMap wouldn't settle for something that was only 75 per cent accurate that would never fly by we try and we have a project working with a group of university researchers right now sort do assisted computer vision where you might click a building and it would automatically do the edge detection in of draw the square for you or you might click in the middle of the road and it can follow the road pretty well but there's always going to be human for OpenStreetMap there's always to dehumanize on it to confirm that it's right or wrong so yeah we'd love to do it and this comes up I work in an international working group of satellite-based emergency mappers and this was a discussion in our spring meeting and they all agreed that nobody had come up with anything yet that could replace what they did manually change detection and landslides that they can get pretty good at it but like doing the actual detection and where the population centers are especially when it's in the rural areas they just we can do it faster with our eyes you know what hidden squares and just circling where there's population we can get
much more accurate data that's useful then we can run it through a computer or but there is a role for that we just have to figure out exactly how to fit in together so they I think you gotta go the other side of the room and encounter and 1 of the tools that you show the money but in the process we have like a Microsoft Bing search father underneath Hunter said now and we deceive Indian mobile version but was it some sort of of funding from Microsoft Office Microsoft for OpenStreetMap in general Microsoft they're being Microsoft being which is that of loans at the moment but when I started Microsoft all being and they owned all their mapping in aerial imagery and they made it available to OpenStreetMap for OpenStreetMap mappers to map from so yeah we better hugely from that donations it would not be possible for us to do what we do if they work for microsoft and being saying you can digitize are imagery because the imagery providers get real touchy about digitizing their inventory that's an asset for them I guess and so they're very I'd I don't know what but they're a little bit touchy about us digitizing the imagery but being in cooperation with Digital Globe who is where they get most of the satellite imagery from those 2 organizations got together and said OpenStreetMap and you can use all of our imagery and you can digitize it so that's a huge boon for us when we need to get imagery for a specific event we need posted imagery because we're looking for IDP camps and things like that it's a negotiation process to get somebody to donate imagery the imagery that we got from DigitalGlobe after a all they estimated being 5 billion dollars worth of digital imagery that they donated to us from the satellites so it's pretty expensive that's this relative cost with the drones right I could I could spend 30 thousand dollars with a droll and probably get some of the same area that was important of all I could spend you know a hundred thousand dollars and get a few stripes from you know the world to satellite so yes so being Microsoft enable a lot of this and turns into open free data will always be open and free so we could do what we could do what we do without the of this that so 1st of all I think it's great what you're doing and 1 question came to my mind and that's when you map a certain area that was before and which might not be in case of an emergency and that just like that the general ongoing work I guess I do you also talked to our local schools to allocate amount because I've been a sister is to certain areas where I would walk around with my little retirement and mapping it and I was like well where can I find innocent people to look at the map they didn't understand anything so the you know such a project or like maybe you mean to make it so that the local people can read maps yes so they understand that that not on that matter that is actually the house that yeah it's amazing right that people I mean so yes at the the short answer is yes we love to go out into communities and show them the maps that now have the houses on it and show them that that's what it means and show that that this is where your House's and this is where your school is and this is where the doctors and now you can see all those places together so that we actually have to do it and then that sort of comes back to the rendering issue where we can render these maps in different formats print of you know we can print them out that's what rendering means printed so we can print them out and in theory if we've done our job well enough I can render a map that is much more easy for somebody who is not familiar with maps to read from this gentleman here did amazing project in Managua where they created the 1st transit maps in Managua that Managua had ever had 2 billion people rely on public transportation every day Managua nobody had managed to put together a transportation map until this gentleman and a group of OpenStreetMap data and a big part of their project was how can we design the printed version of this that for people who have never used a map before and that was a quarter of the time time they spent on the project was getting that print out right so that things that were significant to people in the novel the way they had been advocating for so long without that you know this little treaty that kind of reference was showing up on the map for them so we make sense when they started taking different bus lines that they'd never had access to before because they didn't know where they went so yeah it's a big part of what we do teaching people making it as accessible as possible OpenStreetMap is UTF-8 so we can have names in any language and you just if I'm wondering if for somebody who speaks what he I render it with this slightly if I'm making them map for somebody who speaks English I render it with the English names that's the joy of OpenStreetMap as its multi lingual every object can be named in any language and then when you render it you just pick the languages that who your audience is going to be more questions and until then the the but we're close to turn into so I'm just seems like that do so big security issue because like the use of predicting for our military to have a semantic data on another sovereign country so how does this it work now this comes up all the time this comes up this comes up all the time context so we're worried about humanitarian relief work for example the refugee crisis that's going on right now in Europe right so I'm worried about the mapping that I do know how that's going to make them more vulnerable or not but then other contexts in straight military-type security stuff so whenever we're doing a project if that's it in any way shape or form a cancer we have to go to the local population the local community and they sort of decide what the best thing to do this on 9 times out of 10 the best thing to do is map because a lot of these military's already have this symmetry better imagery that I have a lot of the military's already have better maps than we have they're just not public for anybody else to use but the military so typically what happens the only people who are suffering from the lack of the map data are the people on the ground the community of people who need to map area of the governments and other organizations that you might be worried about what they already have what they need to do whatever it is that they're going to do the same thing applies to you know it comes up with terror to is how are we enabling terrorists were mapping areas both overwhelmed has done terror attacks and that at the request of the humanitarian organizations were trying to deal with the aftermath of what happens after Bhopal Robert task they're intimately aware of what it means for us to create maps that could be used by local overrun and there were 2 spliced local around doesn't care they don't need these maps they're gonna do what they're gonna do and these maps will only help us get the message out about what's been done and will only help us to respond to the damage that that these kinds of groups to so it comes up all the time we always deferred to the people on the ground and to the local local mapping community or the local civil authorities and or the humanitarian organizations and it almost always comes out that the map is gonna help way more than can possibly occur so the management in you know love and take you all the large data for coming thank you for being a part of this you already a part of this none of this happens without you and your contribution so and
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Metadaten

Formale Metadaten

Titel Putting 8 Million People on the Map
Untertitel Revolutionizing crisis response through open mapping tools
Serientitel FOSDEM 2016
Teil 81
Anzahl der Teile 110
Autor Giradot, Blake
Lizenz CC-Namensnennung 2.0 Belgien:
Sie dürfen das Werk bzw. den Inhalt zu jedem legalen Zweck nutzen, verändern und in unveränderter oder veränderter Form vervielfältigen, verbreiten und öffentlich zugänglich machen, sofern Sie den Namen des Autors/Rechteinhabers in der von ihm festgelegten Weise nennen.
DOI 10.5446/31002
Herausgeber FOSDEM VZW
Erscheinungsjahr 2016
Sprache Englisch

Inhaltliche Metadaten

Fachgebiet Informatik

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