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the hello everybody can everybody hear me yes
hands up for anybody who can't hear me I could but other day so I'll welcome everybody to this talk this is a very interesting topic especially because I'm very interested in this topic it concerns all so we're gonna be talking about how citizens and I can participate and have a say in the upcoming but direct consultation and this talk will highlight the
dangers in the hopes we have for the Internet of tomorrow and so we have a very special guest here today our tool must yawning our he's the executive director of the
Working Group on data retention in Austria and we have counseling Berger she is the program the to add GDP and barbaric
Menshevik who was a professor at a lot at Stanford Law School so please give it up for them thank you if it think you from this before we get
started a quick poll the audience demand side if you've already been active in the state the Internet campaign so far and like any phone calls e-mails faxes and they that's not too bad by the end of the session I wanna see all your hands up for ACC getting active in the future so that's our goal for it today
I'm every before sigh but bankers like here Barry consultations them I gotta do people actually know what we're talking about so let's break it down a little and start with what is net neutrality actually the net neutrality
sometimes sounds very complicated but it's actually a really simple concept basically the idea is that the companies that connect us to the Internet should not be interfering with what we do on line that has 3 components they should not be able to block or discriminate against applications and they shouldn't be charging fees to application content
providers to put them in a fast lane and the general idea is that the wall or save forest of protecting the environment for innovation and speech that the Internet has originally created if we were to politicize that
little a why is that's a fundamental for the internet like just
bring it to a point as I give me 1 sentence of Weiser's crucial it is important
because net utility allows us to have this diversity and this openness and freedom that we all like so much about the Internet both in terms of our fundamental rights which we enjoying this medium of mordant in analog physical work and the same time all sorts of economic freedom is freedom of competition it is the freedom of ideas yeah I would say
basically the things that people like about the Internet the revolutionary potential that's all stuff that's tightening neutrality this idea that before if you wanted to speak you needed to be a journalist of being able to reported on by television or newspapers and that now you can easily just go online increased people around the world at low cost and that's pretty cool and that's what neutrality once interestingly enough light because what we're going to talk
about the prices is a very economic driven process and everything that you see that is very very political which higher I guess this is linked to you why you got active and this so what's your personal motivation if you want to briefly say what gets you excited about this and why are you fighting for the future of the Internet well actually I came through
through the economic implications of neutrality of wrote my PhD about Internet Architecture and Innovation and the general idea was that Larry Lessig 1 of the big integrals had always said you owe intended the architecture of the internet was originally neutral so they couldn't distinguish between the applications and content there were traveling over the network and we think that was good for innovation by we don't really know the answers on so we know we should act on the assumption that there was really important and I thought that was a pretty weak bases to engage in regulation and so in my dissertation I set out to say well how does the Internet architecture really influence innovations as 500 pages but that's a deep into network into neuron network architecture economics of innovation and then interestingly the result was about this has actually been really
centers for innovation and so that's how I came to the problem being and then you know once people started to say well the architecture of the user is changing and now Internet service
providers actually have the power to identify the applications on the network how should we regulate that it turned out that wasn't so simple it's really easy to say I'm for unintelligible it's really hard to come up with good rules and so then I thought it was just a really fascinating questions to how to find a good balance between all the different interests of keys and users and innovators and speakers online and so they need to be fair I think my role as an academic today is to help people understand this really complicated topic and I would say just clarify for everyone in the room why exactly is such an amazing asks
where to have on a panel saying case anyone doubted that there's no expertise that's enough yeah I
don't think we can get more than that I that year figures of innovation and you you would get a Ph.D. in the USA they your motivation I guess is more from the European
contacts there had its you get active in the state the internet don't eat coming a I before deceived the Internet but you combine there was this weird issue footage all when I like a was always like civil society person when I was younger started to work and them I did a lot of work racism and then when I had my 1st we boring drawl I started to listen to pop costs and so I came into the hacker scene and then I found out there Tycho rights and there's a really interesting debate about that with this very interesting people
and for some reason I did not get caught but normally I get bored after half a year but in this field I could just dig deeper and deeper and stand that neutrality after data protection was kind of souls and we had a lot of wins in a row data retention in Austria I thought OK let's it's time for a new subject and neutrality sounded really interesting
and so on I just Brett a lot about it talk with many people about it and particularly also write all the laws
that at this time there were very few laws in the world around it mentality and it was a really good basis when the European Commission and started there the each other to proposal too long which is the reason why we having this discussion here and I was in the pole position to do something about it and so we were actually refers to start writing amendments about that law and then in the discussion with the Brussels office of European rights we had this ideal when to a complaint how should it be called its politic the internet and that's
basically the history of the 1st iteration of this company and a good great from before we get into the process of explaining what's happened so far having people exactly or currently engaged in say the Internet when say we we did bad like how many people are behind such a campaign good person a mean of this
we had maintained many new Angil's joining uh in recent months so think there are actually around 2025 that all over Europe and a few global ones and actually in the core team I would say it's about 30 people all over Europe did work on this campaign and those issues in general before we get into the you persisting and how many were
active in the United like could consultation
process now make people advocated for that and yes they have a number in the reactor for million people filed comments in the public consultation with the US in the US I think in general we have a much broader community
of people care about neutrality and in the last iteration of this debate none of the big companies was involved in so that really needed it alive at that question for start ups and libraries and all those people who really depend on the neutrality and as a result we don't necessarily have a lot of money or
people people would do this in their free time nite and i its new volunteers working with me he would
just go home after work and and do research on the weekend so maybe I do think in general that the public interest seen in Internet policy is a lot broader in the west over here and also it's not spread as much across the European member states they are on but still the general problem that we actually outgunned by fuse with lots of money many lobbyists and many lawyers is the same problem here of the beta against that kind like since we're looking
for a new hope in Europe on the Chelsea we want have at least 4 million comments in the public health consultations with this through it's a that's my goal so you guys all gonna get active I'm bail segment has a sofa do I give a quick snapshot of how the prices has worked so for and why we have that regulation before we get to very yeah so basically the history about neutrality in Europe of setting really complicated because most of the time nothing happened
people started talking about neutrality in 2007 after the American debate but readout and as everybody was expecting that the European Commission at some point would start proposing along mentality because it's just too very to reasonable thing to do it would profit the European economy as well as the fundamental rights so everybody was just
waiting on what the European Commission but you but then nothing happened and so actually I 2 countries in Europe started adopting their own laws of 1st the Netherlands and in Slovenia and so on we have 4 reports of the European Parliament which are like a statement of will In all of these 4 reports European Parliament said we are fully neutrality we want longest 1 to protect Internet freedom and so we thought OK it's just a question of time and it's the Commission false as well as the the crews them and predecessor to the former Commission before conducting a weighted a really long time almost to the end of her mandate until September 2013 and then she proposed a huge role which was also incorporating a little bit about it neutrality but was also talking a lot about informing about frequencies about all those loosely related telecom species and um September 2013 actually was really late because as you remember that in May 2014 we had elections on the European Parliament which means half of you before lecture everybody stops working everybody is basically going back to the home country and trying to win a seat for the next parliament and so that was quite complicated to get disability through but there was warming roaming wasn't really populist issue which is essential to understand how disability came about and because of warming is like the carrot in front of the European Parliament every politician wants to go home with a huge victory and the killing roaming charges the things which make uh makes using all phones outside of all countries so expensive is some be populist argument something work European politicians can get a lot of plus points in their home countries and so but this still to a distance of part of to those was the reason why we actually got this true before the election and um in April 2014 we had a huge win in the European Parliament and of the Lord at the Commission proposed that the Internet you've written on top of it but was actually the opposite it was basically legalizing all forms of metric discrimination binds to parliament to inches abrupt they gave it unit neutrality law which repair at all of these problems but it's not only the parliament uh that makes so we also had the Council which is basically the 28 member states they don't reversed clock back to and the net neutrality and so we had to worse what when all those free institutions entered into a routine BG we've been at called trial so free institutions talk and negotiate about the final law and this is the most secretive of negotiation process in all of Europe we basically have no information you don't know who is talking at which meeting about which topic but at the end you have final and it's the young democratic and the inference parent and so the they came to an agreement
at summer of 2015 and October 2015 the European Parliament adopted a law which is a mix that we try to get amendments to be tried to clarify a lot of 2 and biggest
language but yet we did not succeed with amendments and now we have a law which you can read by the as martin trality hormone from a to but it's a little bit like for the most part just picking
up on because I think like if you're not part of the European process identifying sectors in understanding their roles is not so easy say it is recently have been because a set of data protection solved I wouldn't
necessarily agree that this is it I was at the top again for the by as the rapporteur on the dusty undated protected in EU and he compared and ask about how to portray the 3 main actors which were the same I in a really short sentence he basically said say the European Parliament is Miller's the solar Hobbits fighting for freedom and then the Commission which used to be good but kind of fell over is easing guide and then the Council just as Mordor which basically tries to destroy everything else that the little more work public the famed for it the field that if you like the place that you just described I hate like I was trying to follow this from the Lord of the Rings perspective and it kind of feels it cannot see agree but like maybe to
make Illuma plastic kind of I mean it develops the almost fit I would change it a little bit and say the European Parliament was goal nor it was like this human kingdom which also used to be good but then they had the we of corrupt King that sold the whole of the region of and uh in the Data Protection Regulation we had a really good rapporteur dumb Philip either he's Green politician and he actually cared
about data protection which was the main reason why whitefly was so successful he actually got a lot of good stuff in the final
more because they had a good negotiator here and sadly in this dossier on that neutrality we had a really bad rubble to p . Stelios she's a Spanish conservative some people say she was always in the pocket of the telecom industry and so she never really cared about fundamental rights about neutrality about the freedom of the Internet and she just wanted to do something which is positive for the telecom industry and she was negotiating on behalf of the European Parliament but with the other 2 institutions I'm bundle dull formally she would have been found to the 1st reading agreement to to the whole parliament agreed in plenary she still sold us out of many of those points and did not renegotiate for that insanity but um opened up many of the loopholes and ambiguities of that we now have in this it's kind a little bit me so rather than little there
is we now have gone or I'm a bit like maybe if we look into what have we learned from that process so far At that also means that individuals matter as not just the process but it actually matters who's in charge of the dossier which
might also be something that other regions come up with as and yet you can make a difference which is why were also here became is with the rapporteur thing that had such an effect on the trial at once against is that 1 of the takeaways that you would have on the campaign so far yes Robert Europe um matters enormously
um and you have to get a good rapporteur for just YouTube you went on and what we always know we are good in parliament but we are batting Council and really bad and father and what we need to learn this pan-european containing we need to be able to fight for digital rights issues in all of those countries in Europe and not just Germany of just France we need to actually be able to have 1 common European debate which is hot in 28 countries in 24 languages units in part of the problem is that many journalists
only report and stuff that happens in Europe until after after adopted and that's a real problem if you want to get people to
pay attention and understand what's going on so I do think the thing to learn from that is that we need to have earlier so that people can actually do something I I mean so far the process OK
lessons learned we need to come early we tried to come early with the 2nd states on because right now as you already mentioned we are left with a regulation that he's quite a few gray areas that leave room for interpretation and the
question of how to interpret them and how to move forward and develop guidance for implementation we need to know what the problems are so talking about the core problems with the regulation and we're going to consult on and we're going through them so that bit by bit semi will starting with the specialized services what does that mean and what's the
problem it's a specialized services isn't necessarily a bad thing for the general idea there is that the open
Internet may not be able to support all of the applications that we can envision and so there might be some applications you really need very special treatment from the network that people have a hard time coming up with concrete example but they're they're they're in my legs and but that they don't exist so let's just imagine this height unicorn that we are not getting because the open Internet const point and so to provide a vehicle for those kinds of services the regulation allows so-called specialized services that are also provided over the Internet infrastructure that run separately from the opening so far that's not a problem the problem is that the definition of specialized services of when it's allowed to be offered is so loosely formulated that you could use it to circumvent the rules prohibition on past like so they're not Internet rules say images providers are not allowed to offer are fast lanes to if each application content providers so Google or Facebook con paid to be put in a fast so that's good but the problem is the highest he's now say that they think by labeling something as a specialized service they can now start offering fast to holy normal Internet applications that function over the normal so that you can
basically buy yourself a competitive advantage and so the problem is not the existence of fast lanes as such is where to draw the line between the legitimate specialized services
that we want because they encourage innovation and the ones that would just be a circumvention of the general Internet rules and I still can actually
struggle with what a concrete example it's like that if I remember correctly then we've just been at the session of Commission acting and with the earlier he's always talking about the self driving
cars is that really the kind of thing that we're looking into as that's valid like
is that really like how do we deal with arguments like that I think that's a side battle because nobody disagrees
that there might be services even though we can't define them or to put our finger on them that might benefit from the tree and for me personally may be the 1 that comes closest is you know this remote surgery yeah absolutely if someone is doing remote surgery then we want those packets to have very very stringent requirements in terms of reliability and delay of course that's not really what we are talking about because a lot of what we worry about is so this fast lanes on the last meals my to the constant and I'd probably wouldn't be doing remote surgery from my home but I read on things that's the problem let's concede that that's sensible idea the problems where to draw the line and and as
we all know assists Telecom CEO item Petkus said we think
this regulation allows us to offer fast still normal Internet applications like online gaming and video conferencing for a few and that's a real problem because it would fundamentally change how the internet has operated so far are everybody gets to users on the same traps I pay my highest P and the application providers pays the eyes p and then the the networks in the middle figure out how to move the money around so that everybody gets conference and that has kept the cost of starting a new business is incredibly low in if you don't do you intend businesses then you might not really understand how low but it's sort of in the hands of the followers of thousands of dollars not hundreds of thousands of dollars when my Zuckerberg started taste but it costs and 50 dollars when rendered was started they had 12 thousand dollars they were recent writing and in the US Open Internet proceeding that was 1 of the big questions that that our regulatory agency the Federal Communications Commission had to grapple with this is really such a problem if you can start paying for fast ends of it was actually pretty tricky because the path to the good rule was viewed as so if the nuclear option something that had high political cost and so they really the politicians 3 needed to be convinced that this is important and the regulatory agency originally said this thing it's not a problem we think the Internet can change we think we can say innovation by making sure that the slow lane is into that you know if you have a fast growing at a faster rate and start ups can start with the normally and then graduated the fostering once they get success and that created a big outcry where more than 4 million people 5 comments and all the status said no
it's not just Google Facebook down which were founded under these conditions this is not to to the good old days but today things are different we should aim build our companies by
with very little money we don't get in venture capital and as we have about a million users and so if you forced us to pay just in order to be competitive with established companies and we just won't have a chance and I think that's the key thing that regulators and politicians are grappling with that if you come from a world where you don't deal with and then it's sort of had doesn't make any sense because you
know the 1 inside a bakery of course you have lots of costs and then you go to the bank and you know and that's it and so
understanding that that's not how the internet the economy has operated and what we would lose by changing that that's the right and
260 be important point to note here because the US you had a debate about peak false claims and you just gave us the argument like these don't make sense that is not from an innovative perspective but in Europe we had a debate about specialized services those magical unit costs that nobody has ever seen that nobody can give you an example here for sure remote surgeries because they almost never exist they are I think also not self-driving cars because we have tunnels we have rule areas so there's just no coverage in the cell phone network and we we had spent so much of the negotiation on to deciding about specialized services and when we look around at the other that delta also around the world at know what legislative try to define specialized those I think in the US it was just a footnote that soft the whole problem and it took enormous energy in Europe to just discussed something and now we have to solve and we'll talk about regulatory implementation but 1 of the real funny things is that there's actually a regulatory problem pointed out telecom regulators are faced with because we have this great new definitions which should allow for future innovation a specialized services and existing specialized services like weather stations are actually not covered in this definition so they really spend a lot of effort to write law which fails on almost all categories I to like kind of thing this a little together I my background is working in governments alike why we
end up with this is also the case is the difference with the answers will have 28 Member States trying to find a compromise and compromise language tends to like it often ends up being very state in
eastern transportation so that's yet another challenge that were actually dealing with that the regulations also incredibly bait because compromise in translation she's make this whole regulatory faces is very very difficult and another issue that came up and we need to focus on in now public faces is the traffic management aspect D 1 it just briefly
explain what that entails they're basically traffic management is what might be done last day by day you just get its normal network operational
so you do this for example on because of congestion chair it's 8 PM everybody comes home uses the Internet and a capacity at you have available in another book which is not sufficient for the demand to produce and so this is the case for and I speak in the 2 timately start managing the network but there are various forms how when I speak actually don't to does and 1 way of doing it which is also a way which would do well in the US Institute application agnostic so that here I speed is actually not differentiating between applications but uses some other criteria for example consumption based on Congestion Management where just say OK to use used to most of their network capacity in the last hour of their little bit Fröbel but actually it's just a pipe it's getting a little bit smaller I'm not prioritizing individuals applications in that part
of other forms to say like uhm I have uhm user-controlled quality-of-service Flexware where it's actually for
example my Skype that says this is now a real-time voice connection and applications as this is important but not dies speak because whenever a nice p is given the power to discriminate to distinguish between applications there is an inherent problem with that because you have an almost infinite amount of applications that are often also being cryptic in a way so you cannot only see what's inside on and if you don't use to back that deep packet inspection on and
there are many problems that arise and traffic management is uh quite complicated issue and regulation actually gives us
quite a solid legal basis to cover that and so we were just saying there's a free power so whenever you can solve a problem you should do this application agnostic as possible I think the general idea is
pretty simple the general idea is that even if there is congestion we still
want the internet to remain the level playing field where users decide how they want to use the network and every application has an equal chance of getting to users and it's not this idea of an nice picking and choosing who gets which treatment and there would be truly relevant if there wasn't another way but as we have not seen in the West and in Canada foryour almost 10 years if we have had this kind of network management prescribed by the regulated since 2008 men which work really well with and so on and so this has pretty important implications for how we experience into apart from experience the internet that deep packet inspection inspection for a your
perspectives also has huge privacy concerns another issue that is currently in the gray zone is also 0 rating which I would say is quite a big issue for freedom of speech how do you feel about that and what does the
regulations she has a 0 rating
is the extension of applications from users data caps you know right now most of us have data capture the sun on mobile networks often also on fixed in service and so usually the use and application of counts against the cap and if a nice easier rates and application in Germany for example digital comes your Spotify then using Spotify doesn't count against the cap some of the thing well the application the data packets are still being treated in the same way so if I use Spotify and telecoms network Spotify packet comes to me at the same speed as any other packet whether it's Pandora or something and so they say so see that means it's not mn neutrality problem and what this view neglects is that users strongly prefers you're rate kind there are now a lot of studies that show that you experiments slated 1 in the west where you have the same podcast for where they offer the same podcasts to some users on his you're rated bases and for others they counted against the cap and users were offered this rated podcast was 61 % more likely to click on it so a huge impact on user behavior what does that mean once you're writing is just another tool to favor some applications over others and as a result it creates exactly the same problems as technical forms of discrimination and that means if we have a regulatory regime that has great rules that technical discrimination but allows all forms of you're reading then we have effectively made the long meanings and the interesting
feature with the European situation right now is that it's not clear what the regulations that you know the public interest groups
say why actually the rule bans all forms of steering and then the ice PCA the rules allow all forms of your reading and I would probably say well the rules prohibited the bad forms of these you're writing but allow the good work on that shows you sort of the brains in other regulators have to figure out what to do and
again there is a lot of so let's say you know you mentioned democracy part of what we're
worried was paid fast lanes is that it's not just an economic problem for start ups of small businesses who can't pay to be in the fast lane part of what was so exciting about the internet was that he did need a lot of money to speak to people on the same terms as others you no matter how rich you are you can get to people so now the losses in general you cannot charge people to be in the fast lane but then they you can turn around and say well what notice appears to be zero-rated but it's a started that doesn't connotative unify spring hunting page you're rated and all these groups in that activists independent artists bloggers new media they can pay to be zero-rated even and as a result you get the same distortion of 2 classes the kind of content this use of prefer that's you're that that's what the rich people get to the end of the rich speakers here and then the other stuff that counts against you can't where everybody's really very because you really want to get to so that's part of the problem that you
worried do you 1 and 2 that are otherwise I would ask about yeah but the global context because we just had this made to win in India for instance and there's your writing is clearly and so like is that something that you want like little elaborated we have an idea of
what we can tap into 4 argumentation the part of what's interesting in in years that they did a public consultation just about your and there is this prejudice that people don't really care about because it's free and she doesn't like free stuff and so a lot of politicians are actually wore touch the rating because they say all people will be really mad about us mad at us because we're taking
free Spotify away from and what they don't really see a sort of how limiting it it's you know if die to telecommute
see all this band was was Spotify why not give you the same bandwidth for a streaming service of the actual or
they don't really season of the negative incentives that creates for the ice sheets you you only want paid for is you're reading is found with cancer really up and we now have a lot of data that shows that in Europe when I is he started to see a rate constant The after was really the rich you spend was cats or increase the price of unrestricted band and so basically that means as users we suffer because you're writing creates an incentive to know of and with cats and so we have less than with available that allows us to choose the network in the way that we will so but politicians as a safe thing owner my good we touch it because people will be mad because we're taking away free stuff and so India's interesting because
they have in the 2nd part of the consultation alone where they would just
asking questions about you're reading they had 2 . 5 2 . 4 million people commenting on series and that was particularly remarkable because people always say 1 made easier rating as a problem in developed countries but in developing countries that's different in Facebook was polishing this product called Internet . org that's where
they enter into contracts with size piece and then the eyes he gives people access to is your rate is set
of applications that is part of Internet . org and that sort of low rank and so the the set of course you know people in developed countries will be happy some Internet is better than no attendance and the Indians said no you know our startups will suffer you the Americans large companies who will Facebook Netflix they can't Haiti's your related but always start ups time and we want Indian started we want to hear from Indian voices we don't just 1 in here from the largest catalyst media you can pay to be in the to the 0 and so it was really interesting because it's there was this huge mobilization in India and in the end the Indian regulators adopted really new once ruled suppose you're reading where they basically prohibit the bad times there's your rating 0 rating against a fee and 0 rating in individual application and applies a similar applications but no fee was you're reading a whole class of applications but they still allow others is beneficial forms a series and so in that way it's basically a model for what we could be yeah absolutely and
actually already mentioned the Netherlands and Slovenia I know that in the Netherlands there's also just in February the a judgment but also bans derating in the Netherlands highest that like the regulation like the the law legislation in the Netherlands affected now yeah from the regulations do anything at the Netherlands adopted didn't didn't tell
too to succeed but good and also as a clear penalty rating I'm and then of course to European regulations above after it is European law and it's also regulations so does not have to be transposed to national and and you would have thought that OK good now the Dutch lost to store debt but of the Dutch parliament is now in the last stages of adopting a law which will replace the previous 1 but implements the regulation and uh just uh obliged to national legislation with the new European standard and the law they will adopt is actually a complete ban on all forms of serious so they are exactly following OWL augmentation interpreting this new European volts so we cannot be that all of and again it is good because the Netherlands are really sensitive about this issue and I've been traveling a lot to speak with telecom regulators all over Europe and we have a very different set of debates there in every country a few experts that follow the international debates but from the public opinion perspective and we just uh it really different stages of its stay in Germany and France in the Netherlands and maybe also in Ulster debate is quite advanced but there are other countries particularly in eastern Europe in Sweden or the debate is just never happened and so
people just have to learn about what mutagenic actually is and how that will impact before we go to the call to action of what everyone can do just saying already like think about what questions after then opened the floor Baisikeli after this this 1 called where both of anatomical tell you why we need to get active when exactly and what we can
do and say you want to start as and you understand again this year so the phases were committee when exactly and who helped us OK so
but you can go now to safety than adopt EU and there really
easy simple tools that you can use to make your voice heard um and you've seen in the US and in India how an important it's how how huge effect it can have people voice make their voices that if they actually participate in such consultations and if you tell your own story made be and how the internet influenced your education business life but your private life of all those things matter if you think about in terms of freedom of speech of making Charlie and out to makes it really simple for people to participate In this consultation formally or they'll official consultation of Barrett when only start too early June this year and go to the 18th of July which is actually a bit of a flaw in the system because it is in summer I know that's not really the best time for political campaigns also Barrett only has a few weeks to analyze oldest commons because the law sets the hard deadline at the end of August at which the guidelines that Barrett will create that will govern how do you have a net neutrality in Europe they have to come at the end of August on this that deadline is just theoretical I mean they could break it if you really want to again if we are successful in the consultation that there is a chance that says OK we need more time and nobody would object that on but going to safety Internet inform yourself we spent a lot of time and effort cues and you'll find a lot of background information about the issue itself about the other debates in India and in the US and then just make your research and tell other people about because of especially day the context in which you are made your company or you student association or it got to chill rights and you know there are many things we you where you can connect to and where people can actually engage institutions to participate in this consultation and it was not just private individuals that managed to achieve such high numbers of comments in the US it was also that people I went to the company went to the boss convinced him to say something about the neutrality or go to your university and as speak with the people doubt and getting those other actors involved that helps us a lot in the making office and making clear how diverse topic actually is you know the 1
thing I would say I think sometimes if you're not an expert there is this tendency to say well what do I have to offer and I think it helps to think about the problem in 2 ways there are 2 separate questions 1 has the legal interpretation and if I'm a normal user then you don't need to engage in legal interpretation but then there is also the policy issue is with the law like this it supports 2 different interpretations of lawyers will be able to solve so in the end it's of policy judgment call and for
that policy judgment that's where people come in where if you can explain I must start up and when I got started in we had that kind of investment and here's why we wouldn't be able to pay for fast like or you know I'm a student I have a website whatever that basically those experiences that are relevant to the question of how would allowing fast lanes how would allowing 0 rating change your experience that is a real contribution that is helpful for the
regulators and so all of the tools that they put up at say the Internet that you they actually help users of structure you in good at the right points and then when on the draft guidelines come I would I would expect that you guys are go people will publish sort of analyses problem relatively early and then I think the the 1 thing to keep in mind is some stuff might be really bad and some stuff might be not too bad and that might make you think so it's not too bad so maybe I don't need to pay attention anymore and
fear of course there's things that are looking good get are the ones that will trigger an enormous lobbying published by the internet service providers and so no matter what the
draft guidelines say we will need fight widespread public support for the good solutions so apart from generating diverse audiences
to bring that topic which everyone to explain it to make sure that we also have the media coverage etc. I think the easy step that everyone can do a really really cool that's a tool that's on there
is you basically go on and so few questions and that generates an e-mail for you which you can automatically sends to you're regulator so it like Baisikeli interact for you and makes that possible already in like in advance to the act of consultation gives the time is so limited that being active over summer when you're actually supposed to be on holiday and I know everyone's busy with everything else that you wanna say the Internet you can do that alright so that's like that's actually really easy the paired from doing all that trying to amplify the voices this is something you can do right now so I would really encourage I want to do that and apart from that like are there any questions we do have a microphone and the audience so please just he was a hand sign if there's anything that we haven't covered if you need more examples if you wanna know how else taking an active like translating helping sort out the code all these kind of things it's all possible it's attack conferences be creative as questions I'm here for the
difficult that just put and dummy shall we don't bite because there's actually space between you enough there's a hand right over there and using the like so the question is what what can we do to get this topic a bit out of the expert field and into the broader public but but that it's like the big questions of and a when we learn from the successes from from
other regions which is really something that we should do we need a funny people I need 40 people to explain this complex technical legally sheared away which connect to people and in the US which Oliver the jails before the big spiking comments happened because shouldn't before journalists started writing about it and you had a group of comedians that made really funny video and so it is not ask the guys that I read to lord it right analysis that make the web site is actually you need you need to uh intermediaries that's uh sums it up because in my experience the deeper you get into legal debate and indeed it is the colleges itself to the there of using this ability to actually make it sound easy of which is yeah a bad trade in art classes in the and might want like volunteer
fire doing some comedic like European so or something know yeah
but even just talking to your friends
about it I know I have a lot of students and I teach classes on neutrality and they usually start with the students thinking well you know the internet is the way it always
was and then suddenly they think of this might also change so I may want to do something about it and then this would so cool and parties I can talk about net neutrality which really tells you about how different the US debaters where people actually think this is the sexy party topic come but as a result it's really interesting that everybody in grandmother knows about neutrality when I buy coffee on the train the person who sells me the coffee knows about neutrality when I'm waiting at the White House to get in and you as a foreign idea not allowed to walk through the White House without someone's as common I knew and so then I usually talk with the security people they know about net neutrality and so you only get there because it's in the media people blog about it but also keep a share this on facebook they talk to their friends they tell their parents about it and those of pretty simple things that people can do and I think it's easy over here because it seems so remote you know barrack 20 aid regulatory agencies doing stuff behind closed to was that it doesn't feel as if it affects you directly but I think this can really fundamentally change how the Internet works absolutely there's another question
in is work broker maybe was minutest enough or maybe you don't just understand European long amount from Denmark don't discuss that neutrality much in the actually uh but I was wondering you you're talking about the Netherlands and motion the strict law which is stricter than you law suppose for the you look for the year of national parliaments to actually impose so all that a stricter of uh 0 more positive
rewards that transi than just the so of important you or that's beauty of it because it's just
interpreting I know you have to amend your national legislation if that comes
European legislation that's above a particularly if it is of regulation because you national law has always to be in line with what European losses but you can be more specific you can just not contradict with European and what the Dutch government is doing is basically up following their reading of the European law and just making it more concrete and here using the mandate which they have been amending get previous legislation whether it is a we would've with to and buried is talking about
implementation guidelines so they're discussing of how can it be implemented which are really tells you there's
different ways to do this and different readings into that's so of course there's certain leverage which also means if certain elements are already active in this and certain ras el already put international context that actually helps our argument if the strong because then you can say like hits argument practice and it's working really well say that just feeds into making sure that these are very clear because ultimately you don't ones different interpretations because the goal was to harmonize the it's to market so that of course should be the main goal but yes there is ways to interpret the law it's also maybe
1 additional aspect in general the idea was and that's different from the net neutrality rules europe had before before I was the Member States could go further than what was happening at the European level
and this law was designed to prevent that and basically exclusively regulate neutrality at the European level but with respect you're reading there is a lot of debates and he does so basically people say in the negotiation if they agree to not covered it as you're writing as part of the regulation that apparently service not how people view it any more but then law can be interpreted that with respect to its you're reading it basically allows it potentially allows not national Member States to go further and then prescribe some minimum moments when regulators need to intervene but so that is but that it's relatively special 2 series and we we had confusion
about this from the beginning ending in the press conference when the law was adopted the rapporteur
and said on the question from a journalist knows your rating is not covered in this relation commissioner catching you know it's it sits at the site her at that moment and did not object and then after which the European Commission said yeah it's kind of covered but also OK and not prohibited and of now uh and a few hours ago Commissioner acting up and I was answered this question if a rating is allowed or not and he also said no we'll have to see we have to make their practical test before we know that the Lord of the book 2 years on what it actually says on that issue so I also think that there's intentional confusion and in in some parts and uh this ambiguity at the end is helping nobody but even the telecom industry is happy with legal uncertainty and especially so we as consumers as human rights activists and also not to people that would invest in European start-ups because I cannot invest the fight and not sure that this business model will even work in the European network in a few years time are there more
questions from the letters from on behalf from India and the young
like having most of us thought about when entirely beyond the of the thing the funny video button and it had a link to it so that it was click the link was the template is would you name lady and it's not really a debate it the sort of not to see that in the dust on long in use and the so is something that the triangular and secondly in India all of the physical became the face of the leading net is where the 2 hit the spoken and and this is an American built ended the log of I don't is that a similar sentiment now would this similar but
affirming this issue of additional colonialism was maybe the prime motivator
in India in the US I think it was mostly freedom of speech and this uh was it also came out of analysis that being American means being able to connect to different opinions the frame in Europe was mostly as industry policy as a digital single market issue and so we we have very abstract debate some uh some party and the point for a strong interest reading when we send 40 thousand faxes the European Parliament it was also just a one-click campaign which made it easy for people to make towards her but the current tool that we have safety and that is a little bit more complex but it tries to strike a balance between on creating really unique and individual comments on the consultation but at the same time making it easy for people to just like 1 or 2 sentences about what they think and it's a kind of during both and and to answer your question as and where the face but
can be like the enemy I think for it like it is from a German perspective Facebook is more an enemy to privacy so like that link is
very very much on that note rather than net neutrality also because Freebase states is not a such offered the zeroing services that are often offered are on top of data caps that you only have so it's not like the starts to get to the internet so that's why it's really hard to politicize that in that way so we don't have that momentum which is why we need other ways to make things more tangible I would say from my perspective why questions then does anyone feel you now
to go on the sapiens . EU pay click in center e-mail I wanna see all your hand that is getting active off them based on other question there was just a handful of getting into Sora missing in the world here but OK let's have monomers moles of thank you for your enthusiasm
on I follow today Barbara speech and before that we have Mr. came on stage the this thing into this in the other way around it but I think it should be her to give the major speak and have missed that can listen to her and ask him to answer a statements I think we are playing something wrong or we already playing the potential role of being losers and I think we have to fire for means which have the power to be successful you give some good examples of the weekly to be tricky to be all kinds of things the whole German waste we had a word which is out of now saying the shot her argument this to Shin by the reader should you know that that we need something like this no no today and I
would like what our tools which we really have the
power to compete in this struggle for equality thank you it may be that as may 1 thing about at being
entered a stick that picture which is like you know if you're strong enough you make things stop me on a stop there
so I keep things moving which is why when the internet to be free don't be my into this 6 statements that when severe others have something else to say to that you want commons of mean that
that's old uh workers Workers Union a song that you were quoting
and I certainly have union of Internet users but yet principle something like this is needed and I'm really happy to say that 1 more consumer protection organizations are so joining safety internet I think that if we use in European countries where there is no strong child rights NGO scene but we all recognize that that mentality is a core issue for them and that they have to work on and so I think there a lot of the sensitivity is death you know it's interesting of course there
is a lot of education behind the scenes and talking with a lot of policy makers around the world and the West and we would
we these debates ultimately successful through doing 2 things at the same time you need the right arguments and you need public pressure behind them and if 1 of those missing here you can have the best argument that if policymakers feel it just minority nobody cares they will not act because it's painful and so I mean 1 thing I think happens in Germany that a lot of politicians don't really know about this and even if they do they think people don't care and so even just calling new member of parliament and saying what do you do for a 0 rating at would you define a neutrality actually makes a difference because it shifts the debate in a way that shows people that people here of course that doesn't necessarily help therefore with what the entire together things that doesn't think but of course he is and the only person engaged in the decision it so
from our side we would say things will definitely keep fighting we hope you join us arm if there's no more questions than thanks for your attention yeah but if
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Metadaten

Formale Metadaten

Titel SaveTheInternet
Untertitel A new hope for net neutrality in Europe
Serientitel re:publica 2016
Teil 65
Anzahl der Teile 188
Autor Lohninger, Thomas
Schewick, Barbara van
Berger, Cathleen
Lizenz CC-Namensnennung - Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 Deutschland:
Sie dürfen das Werk bzw. den Inhalt zu jedem legalen Zweck nutzen, verändern und in unveränderter oder veränderter Form vervielfältigen, verbreiten und öffentlich zugänglich machen, sofern Sie den Namen des Autors/Rechteinhabers in der von ihm festgelegten Weise nennen und das Werk bzw. diesen Inhalt auch in veränderter Form nur unter den Bedingungen dieser Lizenz weitergeben.
DOI 10.5446/21074
Herausgeber re:publica
Erscheinungsjahr 2016
Sprache Englisch

Inhaltliche Metadaten

Fachgebiet Informatik
Abstract When the US regulator FCC asked the american people about the future of the Internet a total of 3,7 million people participated in its consultation. Over 1 million Indians voiced their opinion when the Indian regulator TRAI asked them them questions about net neutrality. These were probably the biggest direct democratic movements for internet freedom in the world. In the next months the European regulators will ask all EU citizens the same questions.

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