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Conversing with people living in poverty

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has duty and when everyone I'm going to be speaking about quality can conversing with people living in poverty and before read in the talk I want to continue attention to some of the words used in the title of talk so I really just want to highlight a few things because words are important and especially in if you're trying to do good you really have to guard against and the preconceived notions also lazy thinking that yet it invented good just be careful not to kind of you to do that and we also welcome would sort of preconceived ideas and of cultural values 3 there is to of that's and and to accepted and and and work with that of an instance on human so I'm conversing with is really if you want to reach out to people living with living in poverty and we just that might be team at 1st and again we reaching out to people you really want to make sure you're thinking of it as a conversation this is not a one-way we're educating people it's not a 1 way we know which right and telling put people what to do and where ready learning from them as much as they're learning from last and and really needs to be the and and we'll get to that moment later and the next letter would have people and it's very easy to become a kind of obsessed with the differences between oneself and people when it's helping them those differences are important but at the same time there is a space of share a common humanity and it's important not to the side effects in these people that you're hoping they have realized streams families aspirations and and it's tempting to kind of think of developed a cells as of middle class class people who already have reaching out as in some sense being better and certainly we have more money usually were better educated and but I think it would be very a mistake to think of ourselves as better human humans and lastly just the phrase living in poverty and try to avoid speaking of people is this put which makes it sound like being poor some sort of innate conditions and living in poverty really highlights that and poverty is a circumstance that people happen find themselves in rather than something that they are
goal so just a quick introduction to me and I work for
a nonprofit called health we operate throughout Africa and we also have and 1 employee in India and 1 in London now there are about 50 of us in total I'm mean the lead engineer on many which is our messaging platform and then their currently so read developers and end recently hired 1 mole so they're not fall time I haven't actually met him yet because his 1st day was on Monday and I was here and yeah and so we're not that big 18 it's time that we're trying to make a difference so
the mean is a text messaging system such know what it so it's an engine for moving
text messages around and sometimes like to tell people that we write arrow he bought to help people and I think maybe we're on the cusp of seeing what's become a really major things an instant messaging networks have already taken off hand and if you see someone using the phone there's a good chance that they're chatting the will of the text and and we haven't really seen and kind of check out taking off yet yeah so we need to take matching system is really designed to reach out to those living in poverty and really we're aiming to reach a massive scale the whole countries west of people on because we really want to have a a the beginning that I will also like to think of kind we're trying to build infrastructure so nonprofits to cool projects that which are in any kind of pretty small and at some point if you're ready going to transform society what you're doing has become a kind of infrastructure Our Python is our primary language that is the right unions and we used twisted and have for a natural everything but so this is where you definition of poverty so the poverty the lack of basic capacity to participate effectively in society and I really like this definition because rather than highlighting the lack of money is really highlights people's isolation and you this pretty hard for us today date imagine quite hard disconnected people can be pulled from each other and from the society that they're meant to be a part of will get to that but for a minute so this is Africa and this is where we do most of our work and the dots are places where you stand projects and we we have connectivity to mobile network operators so and places like Libya Nigeria can you South Africa and from so just some things about Africa and it's pretty big and it's 13 million square kilometers the that's roughly 3 times the size of Europe and and 3 quarters of the size of Asia there's a billion people so and about a certain more than they are in Europe of is the theory that most spread out yeah but a lot of students smaller than Asia which is forbidden the and then more than a thousand languages and so you have radius you want to work across Africa you and so I just the same in Europe the rate has to be kind of and you have to take care of localization internationalization and even just inside Africa we have 11 official languages in practice we only have 2 languages of managers of record that in theory any citizen can ask the government to interact with them in their home language 1 of the 11 social ones so I'd like you to but I like to kind of go back in time and that's 1994 it wasn't all that long ago 20 years I was just finishing school so I guess was really in adults in in many ways an In an informal Nigeria had 100 million people and that only 100 thousand landmines so it is about that that's 1 telephone per thousand people and probably most of those to the funds were owned by and the rich people so you imagine just 20 years ago people living in rural Nigeria might never have made a phone call probably never have made a phone call and you can probably be he tried to imagine how isolating that this and if you have as service delivery problems a water isn't working who do you tell and you don't have a phone you probably don't even know that even if you don't have a friend who went missing call the nearest government official might be save 500 kilometers away an but it's not like the great public transport to get you there so when things are going wrong it's very hard to reach out and tell someone on and this is really it's an Israeli and drive home and the problem is more isolation and lack of money and the problem goes the other way to imagine if you're an elected official in a country where your constituents have no way of getting hold of you and In and we're collecting information is hard at how can you so the people that you've been elected to serve if just finding out anything about them is is yeah and both of no surprise and if there was no internet access in Nigeria action and useful and effective inside Africa it was the well I really that and have yeah but it's a pretty 1 but things in 1984 was very exciting if 1 1 reason asserts mobile phone network launched in Africa and I should say that the most popular funds in 1994 and wait half a kilogram and cost about 2 thousand dollars so that's fast hold of that and some 18 years to you 2012 said 2 years ago suddenly there's 65 % mobile penetration on average in Africa so roughly 65 % people suddenly have a telephone which is quite improvement from 1 of thousands and this like Uganda we seem credible statistics like there are more mobile phones in Uganda and light bulbs and they react you are getting good use of of mobile phones and UNICEF Uganda brand status project called you report which is it is a citizen kind of sort of Liquid Democracy program where you can sign up a member of your reports and you can submit feedback kind of directed your government and they can asking questions yeah and really what
we're seeing now in Africa is a kind of mobile generation so you and I might have have laptops that we can carry around with everywhere and that we run our lives on and and probably will set the smartphone as and a 2nd device the people young people in Africa really are a the mobile phones are at on their laptops they are the officers there how they socialize how they do business it and and by contrast to 1994 when I see 20 dollar phones which have internet access ravenousness have estimates that uses the they have instant messaging also just economically Africa is growing and continents averaging 5 % GDP growth 1 which is pretty good going and the population of Africa is still very young 1 50 % of Africans are less than 20 so I at that point precoat that's been mostly a consulting company and the rise of mobile phones the and is was already we saw this as an opportunity to reach out to people so we started doing small projects to in the social space and 1 of the earliest of those was text that so text that is really just a simple system to remind people of the clinic visits so I'm sure you know about and it's of the I'm not sure how how many people know about tuberculosis TB but about so typically in Africa if you posted inside replicated from each of the what action tools used tuberculosis and and to because this is a kind of verbal chest infection is how how manifest as diagnosis is very durable and you need to take a course of antibiotics but unfortunately for various reasons people and don't finish their antiparticles is forget to go from to take follow-up visits and often treated with anti-retroviral switch of the wave and forget about the killings for checkups and things and text that was just system which sent people reminder kind of a few days before the visit saying paper and you have an appointment at the clinic and if you can't make it just reply and it has no and that drop the number of people who were missing declining visits from about 35 % and to about 15 % so that was really big success for us and things readers want to do more however it wasn't all plain sailing and and we learned a lot from projects like text alerts and 1 of the things that we learned was that if you can be doing other projects it's important to have a reusable software because otherwise you're rewriting things every time and it's easy to accidentally make things not reusable so was something like text that you need to integrate with mobile method operates on aggregated view connected to the cellphone network and they all have special interfaces which are a unique snowflake and it's easy to accidentally tying your application to something which is really network-specific so you they might give you a unique identifier and you start relying on the and then you change the different modes of operation the doesn't give you this identified and suddenly you have to re architecture applications so we really want to wear struggling with reusability the other the other issue was scaling and for those of you have worked on on small systems as a grown have have noticed this you always get something wrong a matter how good your intentions on and to really be able to kind of that kind of process things quickly you need to try and if you get something wrong when you have to kind and write something and we don't want to kind of trying to scale every single project that we're involved with and the last thing is to think about it if you right a quick prototyping usually leave out things which become really important laser light monitoring good error-reporting could say handling and I should maybe say say something about failure so 1 of the exciting things about operating in Africa is that you the hand and the failure conditions often on the exception there from the rule so for example we run some parties in Ethiopia and this 1 I esteem Ethiopia and state owned and there's no competition it occasionally goes down for a week and then you can't connect to the country so far as you can imagine that makes designing systems to handle that and what their existence and that is can be tricky so in response to these challenges that we encountered and during text that we greater than me and the meaning of the messaging engine which attempts to provide a reusable framework to seperate and of the social applications that we're trying to build from the connectivity to mobile operators and yeah and to current the 2 and kind of production readiness that on all of our projects without having to to rewrite it but the me is the Swahili word that means something like a distant proposal how and although the founder of the kind of distant noise so architecturally kind of what we mean looks like if you look on the left you can see a cell phone so you can imagine someone and holding a cell phone in their hand on if they send us an estimate that close to a cell phone tower it she that comes to 1 of us and consider label transported transport is what we refer to it's approach process that and was sent and received messages to a mythical operator or to enhance messaging services and the next column is another set of processes called the which we call dispatchers and beverages may decide where messages go usually based on a random telephone numbers being sent to receive from and and then lastly on the right we have already the the important part of the defense I've mostly plumbing my the other applications of these are ideas of these a reusable things that tell it can be applied in 2 different transporters and different dispatcher on yet so the
the the way that things are protected the use and horizontally scalable workers so you write workers using twisted and asynchronous and event framework and then if we need to handle more messages we fire up more processes and yeah and everyone to say thank you to all of the people who worked on software like tested that we use and and and Python having the infrastructure to build things on not really helps all of our or messaging between these horizontally scalable processes happens over rabbit and you which is messaging and so it just sends messages backwards and forwards and workers and subscribe to receive messages which the process if workers fail to process messages back and the q and we process later for the data storage we used and we usually have which which is distributed key-value store we chose react rather than PostgreSQL because really be really do want to reach massive scale and so the moment we have I have to say about state there about what I think about said well and since we have about 7 million people who live intractable so far that post-stressed would probably still have been finds that but we really would like to to be able to reach the point where the says we can speak to the millions of people but we maintain which is the twisted react client it's pretty much a direct quote of of the of patches with clients and so on if anyone wants something fun to work on would really appreciate some help in maintaining that and so and some of the things that we both the I mean can you wouldn't project called money which was and attempt to curb election violence in Kenya so in Kenya and not much recent election of election before there was a lot of violence in townships and it was the impression that this violence was triggered by by quote that mobile phones for enabling silence so what happened was someone's house would get burned down a few local people would decided it was said the members of other political parties fault and then they would estimates all the things would be angry Augustine someone's house adjusting burned down I think we all be angry and so then they would estimate their friends and say it was these people faults and then more people will be angry and balance of breakouts this using a money was an attempt to counteract this by introducing sort of peace officers also with mobile phones and the job of these peace officers would be that if they would if they receive such a message will they had the impression that violence was stirring up they would describe a situation to and people at the in years ahead who would then attempt to get the constants of response which would also then be disseminated by SMS and through the kind of peace officer process and will provide the peace officers so as you can imagine you need to respond quickly and I mean you're talking about and violence breaking out on a time scale of ours and ideally you want people to kind of calm down and think about about things more instead of minutes and this is was a system we built to allow and that feedback to to reach NGO and for messages to be sent back out again afterwards and and the last 10 injection had less violence than and the difficult to have a control to measure against that and will set you on the part of the Wikipedia's there projects 0 is 0 right will mainly due 0 project is 0 rated access that's free access to Wikipedia over an internet some of our friends and we do Wikipedia text which is and accessing wikipedia over estimates and this message and that's just kind of makes things a lot lower the barrier to 207 and the speaking of learning about a century after we've created there's still some some problems and the 1 with the just of the big problems is that there were too many projects and setting up and with a really hoped initiated you would be a tool that other nonprofits could use better yeah it it turns out that there are no difficulties 1 connecting genetic operators it is expensive running Amazon E C 2 instances is expensive and we're ready just we don't have enough people to solve all of the world problems ourselves I'm not a surprise against and so this allows us to make goal which is a hosted instance of rule and the idea is that by providing the ego we can provide a way for people to help themselves so we run them as easy to instances we deal with connecting to an if operators and we provide the people with a hosted service where they can come along and build around applications to fulfill their needs and then you see they know better than we do with needs are and so for example the Amiga a simple survey bolder and which we call dialog application begin to remind people that you're not asking a bunch of questions and getting some anonymous feedback is really we want people to really think about this as a dialog between themselves and and the people that are and speaking to them in the mobile phones and then he also wrote an adjusted sandbox so that and a lot of young Africans and can't code of excited about coding are technically savvy and we really wanted to provide a way for and excited young African his 1 of 1 however many African innovation hubs to be able to come to the right the application JavaScript's and and run and stories established but that's what most people know and I'm hoping to build a Python 1 when it is a moment and so it kind of reaching
the end of time but just a quick kind of where we are now so the Domingos had now interacted in the last and here with a total of 7 million people from 1 million at the start of the year so that's 2nd time 7 times as many people as that fall in the last 6 months which is good and we add a centre received 40 million messages and that's up from 12 million previously and we also registered voters in Libya 16 % of the Libyan population of business news 52 votes captured that 16 % of the total population which and I was every probably could be involved that and in Suffolk and election monitoring and we get it and what is interesting about the self-connection London and things that we really the 1st time we were really running a big project of the lots and lots of different so channels of interactions so that use SNS uses the Twitter and makes for those you don't want me to this Dickinson messaging network and some messages and it has about 50 million users and in Nigeria we ran an agricultural awareness campaign just making people aware of the importance of agriculture and then people could download a ring tone from a famous Nigerian musician and that results when in people's so what next and we're adding lots of a again lowering barriers to entry making the system people use and and things like that of a policy that optimum spaces and static so things are constantly changing and we're really moving to what we're seeing is a messaging moved to multimedia messaging and if you're using what's out there so you can send photos and videos and voice recordings and will section moving to voice itself and the many little people in Africa and it even reach out to them you need to do so by voice and must be and we're trying to get at sporting analysis so that we can be sure actually having the impact we intend to and we have something that plants and which are really like helpless and we'd like to build African content distribution network and because the current isn't 1 and 350 ms minimum latency sex next can we root really like to federated instant messaging protocol so think what's up that structured like know so that we aren't all tied into single provider yeah and closing and something that constants said during a keynote and which really she was speaking about and security context but I think it applies equally to and the kind of social space but we show that we can don't accept that things have to be where they are and what to change them thank you
Soundverarbeitung
Subtraktion
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Momentenproblem
Gemeinsamer Speicher
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t-Test
IRIS-T
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Soundverarbeitung
Einfach zusammenhängender Raum
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Radius
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Statistik
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ATM
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Metadaten

Formale Metadaten

Titel Conversing with people living in poverty
Serientitel EuroPython 2014
Teil 52
Anzahl der Teile 120
Autor Cross, Simon
Lizenz CC-Namensnennung 3.0 Unported:
Sie dürfen das Werk bzw. den Inhalt zu jedem legalen Zweck nutzen, verändern und in unveränderter oder veränderter Form vervielfältigen, verbreiten und öffentlich zugänglich machen, sofern Sie den Namen des Autors/Rechteinhabers in der von ihm festgelegten Weise nennen.
DOI 10.5446/20030
Herausgeber EuroPython
Erscheinungsjahr 2014
Sprache Englisch
Produktionsort Berlin

Inhaltliche Metadaten

Fachgebiet Informatik
Abstract Simon Cross - Conversing with people living in poverty Vumi is a text messaging system designed to reach out to those in poverty on a massive scale via their mobile phones. It's written in Python using Twisted. This talk is about how and why we built it and how you can join us in making the world a better place. ----- 43% of the world's population live on less than €1.5 per day. The United Nations defines poverty as a "lack of basic capacity to participate effectively in society". While we often think of the poor as lacking primarily food and shelter, the UN definition highlights their isolation. They have the least access to society's knowledge and services and the most difficulty making themselves and their needs heard in our democracies. While smart phones and an exploding ability to collect and process information are transforming our access to knowledge and the way we organize and participate in our societies, those living in poverty have largely been left out. This has to change. Basic mobile phones present an opportunity to effect this change. Only three countries in the world have fewer than 65 mobile phones per 100 people. The majority of these phones are not Android or iPhones, but they do nevertheless provide a means of communication -- via voice calls, SMSes, USSD and instant messaging. By comparison, 25 countries have less than 5% internet penetration. Vumi is an open source text messaging system designed to reach out to those in poverty on a massive scale via their mobile phones. It's written in Python using Twisted. Vumi is already used to: This talk will cover: * a brief overview of mobile networking and cellphone use in Africa * why we built Vumi * the challenges of operating in unreliable environments * an overview of Vumi's features and architecture * how you can help! Vumi features some cutting edge design choices: * horizontally scalable Twisted processes communicating using RabbitMQ. * declarative data models backed by Riak. * sharing common data models between Django and Twisted. * sandboxing hosted Javascript code from Python.
Schlagwörter EuroPython Conference
EP 2014
EuroPython 2014

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