Cortical Mechanisms of Color Vision

Video in TIB AV-Portal: Cortical Mechanisms of Color Vision

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Formal Metadata

Title
Cortical Mechanisms of Color Vision
Title of Series
Part Number
1
Number of Parts
43
Author
Gegenfurtner, Karl R.
License
CC Attribution - NoDerivatives 2.0 UK: England & Wales:
You are free to use, copy, distribute and transmit the work or content in unchanged form for any legal purpose as long as the work is attributed to the author in the manner specified by the author or licensor.
Identifiers
Publisher
River Valley TV
Release Date
2011
Language
English
Production Place
Joensuu, Finland

Content Metadata

Subject Area
Abstract
The perception of color is a central component of primate vision. Color facilitates object perception and recognition, and plays an important role in scene segmentation and visual memory. Color vision starts with the absorption of light in three different types of light sensitive receptors in the eye, which convert electromagnetic energy into electrical signals, which in turn are transformed into action potentials by a complicated network of cells in the retina. The information is sent to the visual cortex via three independent channels with different chromatic preferences. In the cortex, information from these channels is mixed to enable perception of a large variety of different hues. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that color analysis and coding cannot be separated from the analysis and coding of other visual attributes such as form and motion. While there are some brain areas that are more sensitive to color than others, color vision emerges through the combined activity of neurons in many different areas.
Keywords
The 5th European Conference on Colour in Graphics, Imaging
Vision and the 12th International Symposium on Multispectral Colour Science
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Timings

  420 ms - page object

Version

AV-Portal 3.12.0 (3a2599d676b25753609baac9def5622401886a53)
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