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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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projections in web browsers are terrible and you should be ashamed of yourself

The JavaScript port of proj4 was (relatively) recently moved from subversion to github and updated to use modern build tools.The talk will discuss some of the differences between desktop and web environments when it comes to projections and CRS, other new projects that take a different perspective on projections (like topojson), and why you can't just use an EPSG number in your browser (and should be ashamed of yourself wanting to).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Advanced CartoCSS Techniques

CartoCSS is becoming an ever more popular Ð and ever more powerful Ð tool for cartographic and data styling. In this talk, Stamen designers and technologists will present some tips and tricks to make your next design sing. Tips and tricks covered include, but will not be limited to: pixelation, use of dingbat fonts for texture and markers, post-facto label adjustment, alternate uses for text symbolization, where to find and use entropy, blending, and geometry manipulation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Web Mapping: An educational resource for creating online maps using free and open source software

Free and open source software (FOSS) for GIS continues to increase in functionality and usability, and offers a flexible and economic option for organization that want to create online maps; however, beginners face a broad array of software choices and may not know which FOSS products and packages to deploy in each tier of the web map architecture. Compounding the problem is the fact that much documentation for FOSS GIS is fragmented among these tier-specific products and does not provide end-to-end workflows for designing and publishing cartographic web services and assembling them into an online map product. In response to these needs, The Pennsylvania State University has introduced an open online course entitled Open Web Mapping. The course lessons explain the theory and architecture of web mapping, while walking beginners through the process of deploying online maps with FOSS. Software such as QGIS, GDAL, GeoServer, TileMill, and OpenLayers is introduced as students start from the data processing stage and work their way to the final display of interactive web service layers in a browser-based map. The course is intended as an open resource for the entire FOSS community; therefore, the lesson materials are freely accessible through a Creative Commons license.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoMOOSE at 10 Years

GeoMOOSE released its very first version in 2005. At nearly 10 years old the project has continued to hold on to its original developers and many of its foundation users. Over that lifespan the project has allowed the development team to observe struggles in changing technology, attitudes, and the dedication required to keep such an open source project relevant as it ages.Nearly 10 years worth of dirty laundry will be aired! And a preview of GeoMOOSE 3.0 ideas! And slides with exclamation points!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
30:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geospatial-Semantic Knowledge Management and Linked Data for Humanitarian Assistance

The challenges to sharing knowledge during humanitarian events are well documented. Of these, the lack of effective and meaningful communication between all actors in an event is the root cause of many of the inefficiencies that hinder the ultimate goal of relieving suffering and rebuilding societies. This presentation outlines an approach for applying semantic knowledge management, ontological rules, and Linked Data approaches to address these issues. We introduce semLayer, a geospatially-enabled Semantic MediaWiki prototype application with mobile and wiki-based collection components, built using open source constituent technologies. We will discuss specifically the integration of PostGIS as a data store, and how this approach compares to open source triples stores/frameworks (e.g. Apache Jena) that perform geospatial operations using the GeoSPARQL specification. We will then move into considerations of integrating micro-, domain-, and upper-ontologies and vocabularies, and defining rules that govern relationships between data and entities, including geospatial attributes. We will close with a discussion of contributing to a disaster response use case with a Linked Data approach.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fast Travel Sheds using GTFS Data in GeoTrellis Transit

General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data is the open standard for representing transit systems in space and time. While developing an open source planning application for public transit agencies, it became clear that processing speed was the primary impediment to calculating transit coverage indicators within a reasonable time. At a glance, GTFS is just a set of simple CSV files organized relationally with key fields. But transit systems are far more complex than just spatial data for routes and stops. They need to be able to model spatial-temporal relationships embodied in transit schedules as well as semi-cyclical and shifting schedule patterns. Additionally, the specification is flexible enough to represent many different approaches to operating transit systems and the same system attributes can often be represented in multiple ways.While some transit system metrics are fairly straightforward to compute, certain public transit system metrics are best modeled as "travel shed" represented by raster coverages or isolines derived from them. The GeoTrellis Transit project is an extension of the open source GeoTrellis framework and was created to calculate travel shed rasters using GTFS and OpenStreetMap data. GeoTrellis Transit accomplishes this by creating a time-dependant graph structure that can rapidly perform shortest path queries at a given time of day, based on the public transit schedule.The challenge in developing GeoTrellis Transit involved designing a time-dependent graph structure that contains information about how the nodes connect at any particular moment in time during traversal. Shortest path algorithms on time-dependant graphs need to take into account arrival times at any given node, as well as wait times until an edge becomes available. This makes fast calculation of shortest path trees on time-dependant graphs difficult, which GeoTrellis Transit optimizes using a novel data structure to represent the graph.This presentation will introduce the GTFS standard and identify where difficulties may arise, especially for large systems. It will also describe how GTFS, OpenStreetMap and GeoTrellis Transit can be combined to build a fast time-dependant graph structure that can then be used to create time-based shortest path trees and travel shed rasters.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Do This, and also That: Integrating Open Source tools into traditional GIS shops"

This talk is intended for GIS users & managers who may be interested in open source GIS but aren't sure what the advantages to them might be, or who think Open Source GIS is nice in principle but are afraid there's no space for it in their workplace. In general, "Do This, and also That..." wants to address concerns of professionals who aren't sure how or why to make the leap from traditional/proprietary GIS tools into the wide world of Open Source GIS.Drawing from my own experiences, my goal is to gently present an integrated approach to open source GIS. This is not an "all or nothing" scenario: I want to show the audience how effective workflow solutions can involve both open source GIS as well as "traditional" proprietary GIS they are familiar with.I will briefly discuss common issues faced by GIS users, and explore the benefits of integrating open-source based workflows alongside proprietary GIS. I will cover use-cases for Leaflet and OpenLayers, OGR2OGR, PostGIS, and QGIS. Each use-case will demo a quick and friendly example of how a particular real-world issue might be addressed by the inclusion of one of these open source options into an existing GIS stack.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNetwork opensource 3.0

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. GeoNetwork opensource 3.0 comes with a new, clean user interface based on AngularJS, Bootstrap and D3. Other topics presented are related to performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will also be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals as well as work for Environment Canada and the collaboration with the OpenGeoPortal project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exploring Openness in Geospatial Education

This panel discussion will explore efforts to embed openness into geospatial education, including courses on open geospatial solutions as well as innovative teaching methods that help expand the audience who can engage with open geospatial systems such as MOOCs and open courseware.Panelists include Robert Cheetham (Azavea), Sara Safavi (RackSpace), Nuala Cowan (George Washington University), and Calvin Metcalf (AppGeo).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Scaling for NYC while Tracking Plows

In the winter of 2012, NYC's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) was tasked with developing an application to track snow vehicle operations. The DoITT GIS team was given a mandate to have the application in production before the end of the winter. Due to the aggressive schedule, our approach was to get something up as quickly as possible while enhancing and improving over time. Beyond the schedule constraint, additional challenges were minimal requirements and decision-making by committee with no clear business owner.Three major tasks were required to complete the project: scale the existing infrastructure to better handle the expected demand, determine an approach for communicating the information to the public in a legible and understandable way, and develop and test the application. The team quickly undertook a multi-pronged approach to complete these tasks within a roughly two-month timeframe.Of all the impossible tasks, scaling the infrastructure was the most challenging and difficult. High-profile application launches in NYC that come with press announcements tend to garner traditional and social media coverage and with that national exposure and demand. And although the application would have been a perfect candidate to deploy in the cloud, that was not an option. Additional servers were added and the application was optimized and tuned for performance. To do so, multiple-layers of caching were employed including GeoWebCache and a Content Delivery Network. In terms of visualizing the data, we conducted a quick review of existing public-facing applications. There were not many examples at the time with most cities choosing to show 'breadcrumbs' of a plow's path. We felt this method was not an effective way of conveying plow coverage; our objective being, to show which streets had been plowed and not to show where a plow had been at specific time. As such, we decided on visualizing the data by the time a street was last plowed. Five time-buckets were established and the street segments were color-coded based on the last GPS ping received on the segment. Every 15 minutes an ETL pulls the GPS data and renders tiles using GeoServer and GeoWebCache.The application, PlowNYC, was developed using open source and commercial software and custom code. These include OpenLayers, Geoserver, GeoWebCache, GeoTools and Oracle. Since its release, the application has been enhanced to handle greater traffic, support mobile clients and to simplify the interface. The presentation will cover these aspects of the project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Leaflet + UtfGrids + d3.js = liquid fast, massively scalable interactive web map & data visualization

I will discuss and demo how I use Leaflet, UtfGrids, and D3.js in concert to view and interact with large geographic data on the web. This presentation will not be on d3.js, but rather how to get geographic data from a map to a d3.js chart. I will illustrate why this stack is liquid fast and massively scalable and discus in some detail what a UtfGrid is, how it works and how to create and server them to the web. The context of my work:I am currently working on an open source project called OpenQuake. As a part of this project we are developing a platform which serves as a hub for integrated risk assessment. It allows users to combine seismic hazard, risk and social vulnerability in many different ways in order to obtain output for science, risk assessment, risk awareness and risk management.All my work is available on Github and links will be provided to all demonstrated material.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Getting Started with OpenLayers 3

OpenLayers 3 is here! Now it's time to dive in and get mapping. Join us for an overview of OL3 from a user's perspective. We'll cover common use cases and cool features of the library you might not have heard about. Our goal in this presentation is to get you comfortable with the OpenLayers 3 style of mapping - providing an introduction to raster and vector basics, discussing tips for integration with other JavaScript libraries, and exposing you to the build tools so you can choose just the functionality you need for your mapping application.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Real-time Scenario Planning with OpenLayers

Area-based planning processes are rapidly moving from paper and desktop GIS based processes to online applications offering real-time analysis and feedback. Users want an interactive and informative experience allowing them to generate reports and analysis without needing to understand the subtleties of GIS or spatial analysis. They expect a compelling user experience that works on a variety of platforms Ð ranging from old or outdated browsers to tablets and smart phones.Building from years of experience (and standing on many shoulders), this talk demonstrates some of the strategies and techniques achieved for the Marine Planner platform, an online open-source map viewer and decision support tool. These strategies include UTFGrids, tile caching, pre-processing, and standard and forked OpenLayer libraries, among others. The result is large-scale scenario planning tools with a responsive and compelling user-experience that anyone who has used online maps can figure out.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adding value to Open Data using Open Source GIS.

New Zealand, like many other countries around the world, is developing Government policies requiring open access to public data. The National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has been directed to make subtantial parts of its fisheries, climate, coastal, oceanic and freshwater data more publicly available for re-use. NIWA recognises that making such data available is of very limited value, if potential users do not have access to suitable tools to work with these data, ie: GIS applications. As part of its Open Data programme, NIWA's Fisheries and Environmental Centers have funded enhancements to an Open Source GIS application, QGIS, and made this application available as a free download, along with NIWA data. This approach enables the effective re-use of NIWA (and other agencies') environmental and spatial data by individuals and organisations who otherwise have little or no access to commercial GIS tools. This presentation discusses the value of Open Source (and Open Standards) to support Open Data initiatives, and NIWA's experiences along the way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Trusting the Crowd in a Geospatial Crowdsourcing Application

Crowdsourcing is known as a way to gather information and data from the general public. In last few years crowdsourcing has become the cheapest and one of the most efficient ways to gather data. With the increased availability of smartphones and smart devices, the general public carries a communication device with increasing computational resources, which can also carry a lot of information. With Web 2.0 the access to internet has become simpler and easier.The crowdsourcing application, we have developed is a rating system that incorporates trust into the application. It works by gathering data of the busyness of hangout places from the crowd, specified in terms of a rating of the busyness of the establishment. The data gathered is shown back to the public using modified ratings and the trustworthiness of those ratings. Ratings are shown in real-time and on a map. The end-user platform for which the application is built includes Android and the web.HTML5 and PHP have been used for designing the main web page which works on any end user platform. JavaScript is used to display base maps from OpenStreetMap and Google servers.PHPMyAdmin is used to manage the MySQL Database. Java was used to program the front end of the application.The dots on the map range from small to large, with a small icon indicating a quiet place and the largest icon indicating a busy place. The trust rating shows our confidence in the rating of busyness, using an algorithm that produces a result ranging from 0% to 100%.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions.Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources.Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields.The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries.The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS in Node.js

An overview or GIS tools in server side JavaScript covering turf, proj4js, topojson, mbtiles and integration with Node.js idea like streams.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Repurposing OpenTripPlanner for Ride Sharing

OpenTripPlanner is an open source application for building multi-modal itineraries using OpenStreetMap data about walking and driving routes and General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data for public transit data. With some creative adjustments, OpenTripPlanner can also be used to generate itineraries for ride sharing based on a pool of existing rides.This talk will demonstrate taking advantage of OpenTripPlanner's flexibility in this fashion. The example of repurposing OpenTripPlanner will serve as the basis for a more general discussion of ways that functionality relating to geospatial data can be reused in unanticipated ways.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Crazy data: Using PostGIS to fix errors and handle difficult datasets

Inteligeo is a system that stores a lot of information used by the Brazilian Federal Police Forensics to fight crime, initially in the environmental arena with a later expansion to other types of crime. During the construction of the database a lot of problems appeared for which PostGIS was the key to the solution.This presentation describes problems encountered by the team while loading 850+ shapefiles into the database, linking with external databases and building 950+ views of the data.Although the content of the recipes is very technical, the general concepts will be explained in an accessible language and correlated to real world cases.Topics:*Definition of crazy data in our context*Quick recipes- Spike removal- Invalid geometry detection and fixing- Filling holes- Raster image footprints- Hammering data into correct topologies- Speeding data visualization with ST Simplify and PGSQL 9.3's materialized views- Rough georeferencing using an auxiliary table- Creating constraints*How is crazy data generated and our experience in handling each case- Large datasets- Lack of validation- Reprojection- Geometric operations- Topological errors- Imprecise definitions- Legacy databases- Bad georeferencingWe will also discuss why is handling crazy data important for the Brazilian Federal Police, our efforts in cleaning up data at the source and the implications of geographical data in general for fighting crime.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ILWIS, the next generation tool framework for GIS and remote sensing

The Integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS, http://52north.org/communities/ilwis/) is a GIS and remote sensing software integrating raster, vector and thematic data set processing into a desktop application. ILWIS is hosted under the umbrella of the 52North project and managed and maintained by ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands. ILWIS is currently subject to a significant refactoring and modularization process referred to as ILWIS Next Generation (ILWIS NG). This will increase attractiveness for developers and lowers their entry requirements. It will provide a sustainable code base for the next decade and allows for integration with other open source software. Beneficiaries are researchers, educators and project executers. It will allow them to use GIS and remote sensing functionality in an easy and interoperable manner on a single desktop and in a web and/or mobile environment in order to integrate their work with others in a standardized way. Based on requirements analysis meetings with a small team at ITC, an architecture was created to host the modular components of ILWIS NG. The implementation of this architecture was started in 2013 and comprised the creation of the QT-based core software centered around a plug-in concept which supports connectors. This supports different data formats and interfaces to other software packages. As first extensions, a Python API and WFS have been developed and data connectors to PostgreSQL and OGC's SWE are underway, as well as a flexible mobile app environment, making it possible to configure lightweight GIS apps within a very short time. The presentation will embark upon the justification of starting the software refactoring and will provide an overview of the new modular architecture, giving insight into the design choices which were made. The presentation will also expose the GIS and image processing functionalities within ILWIS and how they are made available in the new interoperable setup indicating the libraries and standards on which they are based. Examples will be given on the many projects in which ITC has used ILWIS already and the potential use of ILWIS Next Generation in combination with OSGEO projects in the future.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Extracting geographic data from Wikipedia

A large fraction of Wikipedia's millions of articles include geographic references. This makes Wikipedia a potentially rich source for themed, curated geographic datasets. But the free form nature of Wikipedia's markup language presents some technical challenges. I'll walk through the Wikipedia API, show how to get to the various places where spatial info might be found, and show some blind alleys I've followed. Examples are from a project that uses Wikipedia to enhance a map-based iOS app of some US National Park Service data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Choose your own Adventure - Open Source Spatial on OpenShift

Learn how to build quick and easy open source mapping solutions using several different languages and datastores. Well start by selecting our source data, and a database to house it. Then, we'll pick language and a simple microframework to power a basic REST API. Finally, we add Leaflet Maps for user-facing data visualization and controls. Feel free to bring a laptop and follow along to launch your very own mapping application during this short talk.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)