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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An Automated, Open Source Pipeline for Mass Production of 2 m/px DEMs from Commercial Stereo Imagery

We have adapted the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) - a suite of automated, open source, command-line photogrammetry tools originally developed for NASA planetary missions - to process high-resolution stereo satellite imagery of the Earth. These tools are multithreaded, memory efficient and scalable, which enables processing of "big image data" (e.g., 16-bit panchromatic WorldView images with dimensions ~36000 x 460000 px). We have deployed this pipeline on the NASA Pleiades supercomputer to generate ~2 m/px digital elevation models (DEMs) and ~0.5 m/px orthoimages for thousands of WorldView-1/2 along-track stereopairs. New ASP tools mitigate systematic DEM artifacts and allow for automated, a posteriori DEM coregistration using iterative closest point algorithms. When existing control data are available (e.g. LiDAR, GPS), automated alignment routines offer sub-meter horizontal and vertical DEM accuracy.Our research applications focus on ice sheet dynamics in Greenland/Antarctica and ice/snow evolution in the Pacific Northwest. We have developed an additional collection of tools for DEM analysis, including utilities to produce maps of 3D surface displacement (velocity) vectors and eulerian/lagrangian elevation change. We present the following case studies to highlight the capabilities of these data and our open source workflow:-A 57+ DEM timeseries from 2008-2013 for Greenland's most dynamic outlet glacier, revealing >40 m/yr interannual thinning and large seasonal variability-Annual DEM mosaics that reveal the ongoing evolution of West Antarctica's "weak underbelly", an area roughly the size of New Mexico-Repeat DEM timeseries for Mt. St. Helen's showing volcanic dome growth, glacier advance, canopy height, fluvial erosion/deposition, and landslides.For many applications, DEMs derived from high-resolution satellite imagery are comparable to those derived from airborne LiDAR data, with the advantage of global, on-demand tasking capabilities and reduced costs. Archived commercial stereo imagery is available at no cost to federal employees or federally-funded researchers, and the tools/methods highlighted here offer an automated, open source alternative to traditional, GUI-based, commercial photogrammetry software packages. https://github.com/NeoGeographyToolkit/StereoPipeline
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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UrbanSim2: Simulating the Connected Metropolis

<style type="text/css"><!--td br --></style>UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatial simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.<style type="text/css"><!--td br -->UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatialå simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.--></style>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNetwork opensource 3.0

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. GeoNetwork opensource 3.0 comes with a new, clean user interface based on AngularJS, Bootstrap and D3. Other topics presented are related to performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will also be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals as well as work for Environment Canada and the collaboration with the OpenGeoPortal project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exploring Openness in Geospatial Education

This panel discussion will explore efforts to embed openness into geospatial education, including courses on open geospatial solutions as well as innovative teaching methods that help expand the audience who can engage with open geospatial systems such as MOOCs and open courseware.Panelists include Robert Cheetham (Azavea), Sara Safavi (RackSpace), Nuala Cowan (George Washington University), and Calvin Metcalf (AppGeo).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A jumpstart for your mobile map app

Would you like to get started programming mobile mapping applications? There's a lot to keep in mind: a responsive layout, a mapping framework, positioning of controls and buttons, offline caching of tiles, and finally compiling it all into a mobile app.This presentation walks you through some problems and solutions, culminating in MobileMapStarter. Techniques discussed include jQuery Mobile, Leaflet, and PhoneGap/Cordova.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
13:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Spatial Temporal Network Web Visualization Techniques

Maps are traditional means of presentation and tools for analysis of spatial information. The power of maps can be also put into service in analysis of spatio-temporal data, i.e. data about phenomena that change with time. Exploration of such data requires highly interactive and dynamic maps. Using geospatial open source software, various techniques for visualizing spatial temporal network change data and combinations of spatial temporal network, point and area data are evaluated. Linear referencing represents locations along routes, linear features with an established measurement system, using relative positions. It allows locating events along routes without segmenting it, and has been applied to manage linear features in transportation, utilities, along trail networks and stream networks. Linear referencing for events occurring along a network through time are visualized using both animations and interactive time line visualizations. Sliders are used to give the user manual control to step through the data, allowing them to explore the data presented in each time step. Categorized point events (i.e. traffic accident types, flood locations, etc.) appear at muItiple locations along the network. Color and size of symbols are used to denote these dynamic point event attribute changes and location changes. In addition, line segments are mapped using size and color to identify the changes occurring over time. Some of the combinations of changes evaluated include: attribute change (i.e. traffic accident type), spatial attribute change (i.e. flood boundaries), moving objects (i.e. traffic accidents), rate of change (i.e. fish survival by stream segment) and spatio-temporal aggregation (i.e. multiple fish releases by watershed). Some linear visualization techniques evaluated include: run maps and map and line chart visualization techniques similar to the famous Napoleon's retreat Minard visualization.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Building Open Source Projects in Government Esri Ecosystems

The challenges that are most commonly discussed by proponents of open source in government technology relate to changing the culture among technical staff and explaining the value of open tools and systems. But beyond the political concerns and misperceptions, there are practical complications in implementing these tools inside proprietary tech ecosystems like Esri. Although it's becoming easier, injecting open source into the Esri stack can be convoluted, to say the least.For all of its challenges, however, there have been many successful open source implementations in all levels of government, from open data portals to full-scale applications. Using case studies from recent Code for America projects, this talk will identify some of the more difficult challenges and highlight a few techniques for integrating open source geo tools into the Esri stack with a focus on minimizing difficulty for the developer and maximizing benefit for the end user. The talk will focus on web applications and tools while touching on data interoperability, spatial analysis, and trainings/documentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adding value to Open Data using Open Source GIS.

New Zealand, like many other countries around the world, is developing Government policies requiring open access to public data. The National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has been directed to make subtantial parts of its fisheries, climate, coastal, oceanic and freshwater data more publicly available for re-use. NIWA recognises that making such data available is of very limited value, if potential users do not have access to suitable tools to work with these data, ie: GIS applications. As part of its Open Data programme, NIWA's Fisheries and Environmental Centers have funded enhancements to an Open Source GIS application, QGIS, and made this application available as a free download, along with NIWA data. This approach enables the effective re-use of NIWA (and other agencies') environmental and spatial data by individuals and organisations who otherwise have little or no access to commercial GIS tools. This presentation discusses the value of Open Source (and Open Standards) to support Open Data initiatives, and NIWA's experiences along the way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions.Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources.Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields.The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries.The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Government as a Contributing Member of the OpenStreetMap (OSM) Community

OpenStreetMap (OSM) is now TriMet's standard source for routable base map data. TriMet utilizes OSM for internal systems and applications that necessitate a routable base map including, but not limited to: Computer-Aided Dispatch/Automatic Vehicle Location (CAD/AVL) system; Call Center and Field Trip applications; LIFT paratransit mobile data terminals (MDTs); OpenTripPlanner, an open source, multimodal trip planner; and fixed route scheduling system for on-street service.TriMet is now a committed, contributing member of the OSM community. Working with the community and local jurisdictions is a standard business practice supported with a full-time employee (FTE) that is dedicated to OSM maintenance and associated datasets in the seven counties area. This effort sustains the increasing number of systems in the agency that require routable networks, and it supports seamless multi-agency trip planning and analysis in the region.This presentation will include:¥ Emerging technologies on the market that require a seamless routable network, and why OSM is an obvious solution to fulfill new system requirements¥ TriMet's OSM Improvement Projects for the seven county regional area in Portland in support of vehicle, walking, biking and transit routing in the four county metro area¥ The business justification for a dedicated FTE in support of continued maintenance of OSM¥ The financial support for this position which demonstrates the recognition of OSM's importance from both an agency and regional perspective.¥ Benefits of collaboration between the OSM community and government¥ Facilitation of progress in this area with open data policies, data portals, and enhanced software tools
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Shortest Path search in your Database and more with pgRouting

pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide shortest path search and other network analysis functionality.This presentation will show the inside and current state of the pgRouting development, from its wide range of shortest path search algorithms to driving distance calculation or "Traveling Sales Person" (TSP) optimization. Additionally we will give a brief outlook and introduction of upcoming new features like the Ê"Vehicle Routing Problem" (VRP) solver, and what we have in mind for future releases.We will explain the shortest path search in real road networks and how the data structure is important to get better routing results. Furthermore we will show how you can improve the quality of the search with dynamic costs and make the result look closer to the reality. You will also learn about difficulties and limitations of the library, and when pgRouting might not be not the right tool to solve your routing problem.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adopting OGC Standards in a Flood Alert System

This presentation is about the adoption of the OGC - Open Geospatial Consortium standards in Sao Paulo Flood Alert System which was based on matrix coordinates and static maps.The Flood Alert System has more than 300 telemetric stations composed by rain gauges, water level sensors placed on rivers and reservoirs, water quality sensors, weather stations and a S-band weather radar reaching 240 kilometers of scanning range. The system offers Real Time support for a large metropolitan area and its Emergency Centers, Civil Defense groups, Government, Service companies and general public.We have integrated Geotools (for data conversion), Geoserver (services like WMS, WFS), DB2, OpenStreetMap, uDig, Quantum GIS and some other softwares in our architecture. This set of tools provides many possibilities to easily integrate our data with other systems and external data, like some Hydraulic and Hydrological models that return geospacial data with flooding area forecast and vulnerable buildings.Talking about the architecture, the adoption process, some of the issues, apllied solutions and further development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoScript - A Geospatial Swiss Army Knife

GeoScript adds spatial capabilities to dynamic scripting languages that run on the JVM. With implementations in Python, JavaScript, Scala, and Groovy, GeoScript provides an interface to the powerful data access, processing and rendering functionality of the GeoTools library.GeoScript provides concise and simple apis that allow developers to perform tasks quickly making it a great tool for the day to day data juggling that comes with geopspatial data. This talk will focus mainly on real world examples that showcase the power of the library.Come check this talk out if you are interested in learning about a new tool to add to your geospatial hacking toolbox. Maybe you have tried to use GeoTools but find it too difficult and complex to use. Or perhaps your java skills are not where you would like them to be. If that is the case this talk, and GeoScript, might be just what you are looking for.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ILWIS, the next generation tool framework for GIS and remote sensing

The Integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS, http://52north.org/communities/ilwis/) is a GIS and remote sensing software integrating raster, vector and thematic data set processing into a desktop application. ILWIS is hosted under the umbrella of the 52North project and managed and maintained by ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands. ILWIS is currently subject to a significant refactoring and modularization process referred to as ILWIS Next Generation (ILWIS NG). This will increase attractiveness for developers and lowers their entry requirements. It will provide a sustainable code base for the next decade and allows for integration with other open source software. Beneficiaries are researchers, educators and project executers. It will allow them to use GIS and remote sensing functionality in an easy and interoperable manner on a single desktop and in a web and/or mobile environment in order to integrate their work with others in a standardized way. Based on requirements analysis meetings with a small team at ITC, an architecture was created to host the modular components of ILWIS NG. The implementation of this architecture was started in 2013 and comprised the creation of the QT-based core software centered around a plug-in concept which supports connectors. This supports different data formats and interfaces to other software packages. As first extensions, a Python API and WFS have been developed and data connectors to PostgreSQL and OGC's SWE are underway, as well as a flexible mobile app environment, making it possible to configure lightweight GIS apps within a very short time. The presentation will embark upon the justification of starting the software refactoring and will provide an overview of the new modular architecture, giving insight into the design choices which were made. The presentation will also expose the GIS and image processing functionalities within ILWIS and how they are made available in the new interoperable setup indicating the libraries and standards on which they are based. Examples will be given on the many projects in which ITC has used ILWIS already and the potential use of ILWIS Next Generation in combination with OSGEO projects in the future.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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24-hr Latency End to End Data Processing Using Open Source Technologies for the Airborne Snow Observatory

JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory is an integrated imaging spectrometer and scanning LIDAR for measuring mountain snow albedo, snow depth/snow water equivalent, and ice height (once exposed), led by PI Dr. Tom Painter. The team recently wrapped our second "Snow On" campaign where over a course of 3 months, we flew the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir; focusing initial on the Tuolumne, and then moving to weekly flights over the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado.To meet the needs of its customers including Water Resource managers who are keenly interested in Snow melt, the ASO team had to develop and end to end 24 hour latency capability for processing spectrometer and LIDAR data from Level 0 to Level 4 products. Fondly referring to these processing campaigns as "rodeos" the team rapidly constructed a Big Data open source data processing system at minimal cost and risk that not only met our processing demands, but taught the entire team many lessons about remote sensing of snow and dust properties, algorithm integration, the relationship between computer scientists, and snow hydrologist; flight and engineering teams, geographers, and most importantly lessons about camaraderie that will engender highly innovative and rapid data systems development, and quality science products for years to come.Chris Mattmann, Paul Ramirez, and Cameron Goodale for the ASO project will present this talk and will detail the story of the Compute processing capability on behalf of the larger team, highlighting contributions of its key members along the way. We will cover the blending of open source technologies and proprietary software packages that have helped us attain our goals and discuss areas that we are actively investigating to expand our use of open source.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenDroneMap

Aimed at developers and end-users, this presentation will cover the current state-of-the-art of OpenDroneMap, toolkit of FOSS computer vision tools aiming to be easy to use for referencing unstructured photos into geography data (colorized point clouds, referenced photos, orthophotos, surface models and more), whether the images be sourced from street level photos, building interiors, or from sUASs (drones).Currently no such comprehensive FOSS toolkit exists and is easy to use and install. ODM aims to fill this gap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoTools, GeoServer, GeoGit: A Case Study of Use in Utility Field Work

After creating a custom application featuring ArcSDE and the ESRI Mobile SDK for use by the field crew from a local Mosquito and Vector Abatement District, we sought an alternative to the high overhead from the proprietary software. By utilizing GeoTools, GeoServer, and GeoGit, we were able to develop a full-fledged application maintaining the same functionality and usability of the original application, without the high cost of entry.The GeoTools application, "Mosquito," and GeoServer, were placed on each of the field laptops of the twenty-member crew, serving both the application and cached base layers to allow for offline data connection. A USB Bluetooth GPS dongle was used to allow workers to locate themselves within the application. GeoGit was utilized to allow the disparate field workers to merge and synchronize data to the master database at the end of their shift.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Next Generation of Printed Maps

Mapfish-print is a library and web-application for printing maps and reports using data from multiple online web mapping solutions like WMS, WMTS, OSM, WFS, GeoJson, etc... The project is now nearly a decade old and is being used by a large number of websites. However, there are limitations to the original design, including the inability to have more than one map in a page, limited formatting and output restricted to PDF (in practical terms).Mapfish-print V3 is the result of a major change in the underlying implementation. Thanks to integration with Jasper Reports and the new pluggable architecture the new version of Mapfish print is more powerful, flexible and scalable than ever before.This talk will be targeted at the primarily website developers and managers will look at: * The new features present in the new version * How to use the new features * How to use the report designer * Examples of advanced formatting * How to upgrade from previous versions * The design decisions that allow mapfish-print to be a more scalable solution * A very high level look at the ways the application can be extended by a developer for a specific vertical
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Update on new OGC Standards: GeoPackage, OWS Context & Geosync

This presentation presents an overview on new OGC standards and developer tips on how to build your own implementations from scratch or on top of existing open source libraries that implement them. We cover GeoPackage, the new SQLite-based geospatial data format; OWS Context for describing a group of related spatial data resources (e.g. for map composition); and the emerging Geosync architecture based on lessons from CouchDB.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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TeachOSM

For the past three years Nuala Cowan & Richard Hinton of the Geography department at the George Washington University have integrated the open source mapping platform, OpenStreetMap into the curriculum for their introductory undergraduate Geographical Information Systems (GIS) & Cartography classes; traditionally the domain of desktop, proprietary software. Professors Cowan and Hinton have sought to expand the traditional curriculum, and expose students to various different open source software's, web based platforms, and data collection initiatives, specifically in a service-learning environment.In collaboration with both local & international partners (American Red Cross 2012, USAID 2014), GW Geography students have used high-resolution satellite imagery to trace road and building infrastructure (Columbia & Indonesia 2012, Kathmandu 2013, Philippines & Zimbabwe 2014), data that is subsequently used to support disaster preparedness efforts.Initiated by a small innovative teaching grant we have started work with OpenStreetMap foundation to develop a web site that would allow other instructors to replicate our mapping assignment specific to their particular discipline and curricular needs. This site is called TeachOSM.org. Our funding has since been matched by the World Bank, USAID (OTI and The Geocenter), the State Department and The American Red Cross. With this funding the scope of the project has been expanded to include the redevelopment of the OSM Tasking manager. The OSM Tasking Manager is a custom-mapping tool that facilitates collaborative mapping projects with a humanitarian focus. The purpose of the tool is to divide a mapping job into individual smaller tasks for group work, while guaranteeing coverage and minimizing overlap. New additions to the Tasking Manager will allow instructors to assign cells to individual students for both data creation, and data validation roles.Mapping has applicability across many fields and communities of interest, and can used to document, archive, plan and contribute to both local and international initiatives.Open source mapping modules and assignments are also a unique way to integrate service-learning strategies in course curriculum, while exposing students to new and exciting technological platforms. The experience teaches civic responsibility and the value of collaborative efforts in the global community.The collaborative mapping initiatives at GWU Geography have been exclusively disaster related to date, as this coincides with the research interests of the faculty involved. We believe this instructional module/assignment is applicable to many disciplines and teaching scenarios, and the objective of the TeachOSM platform is to open that possibility to these other fields, in a comprehensive user friendly way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Case Study: Developing OpenLayers-based Mobile Applications

Developing an application with the capability to view, collect, and edit geospatial data in connected, limited connectivity, and disconnected environments was a necessity for the ROGUE project. The first version of the application was developed using Cordova/PhoneGap, with everything written in html, css, and javascript, using OpenLayers 2.13 as the mapping library, and jQuery Mobile for the UI. Due to various UI concerns, we decided to implement another version utilizing as much of the native Android API as possible. We also developed a third mobile application using OpenLayers 3 as the mapping library, and Bootstrap for the UI. This talk will cover our experience developing these three geospatial mobile applications, specifically the differences between the approaches we took and any challenges that we overcame.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapStory: The next plateau

MapStory.org is a community-driven open educational resource that lets people share and peer review observations about how the world evolves over time and space. It's built on an open source geospatial stack (PostGIS, GeoServer, OpenLayers, GeoNode) and aims to empower both authoritative and public participation in data collection, peer review, and storytelling. We want to use this session to debut a "new plateau" for MapStory that includes an updated user interface with new features, namely integration of GeoGit Ôcrowdediting' of data and XYT frames for MapStories (what we call StoryBoxes).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
54:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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State of GeoServer and GeoTools 2014

GeoServer and the Java toolkit GeoTools comprise one of OSGeo's fastest moving mapping ecosystems. In addition to this core we will cover java-stack developments in JTS, GeoWebCache and ImageIO-Ext.First up is "State of GeoServer" reviewing the new and noteworthy features introduced in the past year. Our six month release cycle sees GeoServer 2.5 and 2.6 being released this year. These releases bring together exciting new features: WCS 2.0 and WCS 2.0 Earth Observation profile, batch importer, and a fresh implementation of GetFeatureInfo.Switching to technical for a GeoTools update. A passion for performance sees improvements in PNG and JPEG encoding, rendering from PostGIS and experimental JDK work. This presentation provides a review of new features, api changes and community modules. We have simplified the core FeatureCollection interface, introduced partial 3D support, structured grid coverages, multiple grid coverages and extended JTS Geometry with Curves.Data formats support continues to grow with the latest GeoPackage, native NetCDF support and a new shapefile and wfs client implementation. Database users have table and index management methods to look forward to. Extensions have seen a lot of activity with WMS client improvements, vector grids, and a transform extension for dynamic feature collection processing.Attend this talk for a cheerful update on what is happening with these great OSGeo projects! Whether you are an expert user, a developer, or simply curious what these projects can do for you, this talk is for you.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)