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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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projections in web browsers are terrible and you should be ashamed of yourself

The JavaScript port of proj4 was (relatively) recently moved from subversion to github and updated to use modern build tools.The talk will discuss some of the differences between desktop and web environments when it comes to projections and CRS, other new projects that take a different perspective on projections (like topojson), and why you can't just use an EPSG number in your browser (and should be ashamed of yourself wanting to).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exposing NASA's Earth Observations

The satellites which comprise NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) have a long history of capturing rich datasets with global coverage over extended periods of time. While the data itself is rich (and open!), it can be a daunting task for uninitiated users to find suitable datasets, learn the data format, and subsequently find interesting phenomena. Even for those who are familiar with the data, it can be a time consuming process. But thanks to the proliferation and maturity of open source geospatial software, NASA has been able to build an imagery ingest pipeline, open source tiled imagery server, and open source, web-based mapping client to encourage exploration and discovery of NASA datasets. This talk will describe how NASA is building these capabilities through the Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) and Worldview client, demonstrate how others are building upon them, and show what it takes to integrate NASA imagery into clients using the GIBS API.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
33:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Spatial in Lucene and Solr

Apache Lucene is a Java toolkit that provides a rich set of search capabilities such as keyword search, query suggesters, relevancy, and faceting. It also includes a spatial module for searching and sorting with geometric data using either a flat-plane model or a spherical model. The capabilities therein are leveraged to varying degrees by Apache Solr and ElasticSearch--the two leading search servers based on Lucene.In this talk I'm going to start by briefly covering some core features of this search platform so that the audience appreciates the unique role it plays in the crowded world of information-retrieval. I will then show examples of using some spatial features in Apache Solr such as:? indexing points, polygons, and other shapes into a Lucene document? filtering search results by a query shape, to include using different search predicates? sorting by distance between indexed points and a query pointNext I will review some spatial features in Lucene spatial and ElasticSearch such as:? sorting bounding boxes by overlap percentage with a query box? aggregating geohash grid counts for heatmapsThe talk will also note the internal architecture and dependencies of Lucene spatial, and discuss a key dependent library called Spatial4j. At the end of the talk I will note some limitations to be aware of, as well as planned improvements. Finally, key advances in geodesic (spherical geometry) information retrieval in Spatial4j will be highlighted.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
30:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geospatial-Semantic Knowledge Management and Linked Data for Humanitarian Assistance

The challenges to sharing knowledge during humanitarian events are well documented. Of these, the lack of effective and meaningful communication between all actors in an event is the root cause of many of the inefficiencies that hinder the ultimate goal of relieving suffering and rebuilding societies. This presentation outlines an approach for applying semantic knowledge management, ontological rules, and Linked Data approaches to address these issues. We introduce semLayer, a geospatially-enabled Semantic MediaWiki prototype application with mobile and wiki-based collection components, built using open source constituent technologies. We will discuss specifically the integration of PostGIS as a data store, and how this approach compares to open source triples stores/frameworks (e.g. Apache Jena) that perform geospatial operations using the GeoSPARQL specification. We will then move into considerations of integrating micro-, domain-, and upper-ontologies and vocabularies, and defining rules that govern relationships between data and entities, including geospatial attributes. We will close with a discussion of contributing to a disaster response use case with a Linked Data approach.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Manager's Guide to PostGIS

Your staff keep talking about this "PostGIS" thing, but what is it? Does anyone (important) else use it? What for?This talk gives a brief overview of the place of PostGIS in spatial IT architecture, how PostGIS compares to proprietary alternatives, who is using PostGIS, and how organizations transition to open source databases.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenSource GIS surveying - water application

It became possible lately to deploy a full OpenSource application stack for field surveying. This presentation describes a water distribution and waste-water management project from a technical point of view, with a strong integration of mobile tools within an industrialized GIS.This projects features a GIS part, with a centralized reference data storage leveraging PostgreSQL/PostGIS, and uses QGIS as a user interface. This combination allows to manage custom data with high volumes efficiently. The project also includes an important mobile side. Implemented on a rugged tablet, a custom tool has been setup to capture and enrich field data. The software is based on ROAM, a new OpenSource software designed for field survey. The tablet is connected on a 3G/4G network and takes advantage of a GNSS antenna to increase GPS precision. It also features an autonomous offline data management module, so as to be able to work in bad network access conditions. The tablet also embeds all required data for greater efficiency. One specificity of this project is the implementation of a synchronization tool between the data used in mobile situation and the reference data, in a multi-user environment.This synchronization tool, developed with PostGIS and SpatiaLite, let users manage data history, data modifications, data merges, offline mode, as well as branches, for parallel versions of the same data. The latter enables the design of evolution scenarios of the network. A classic issue of the surveying work in mobile situation is therefore solved, being able to work in a disconnected mode with multiple land surveying teams smoothly, while keeping data traceability.The project currently evolves towards water simulation integration, interconnection with SCADA industrial systems, and sensor data automated integration (through webservices).All These components therefore constitute a full software package, fully opensource. The various components can be used for other applications than water management. The new features developed thanks to this project can solve mobile GIS issues, and optimize the TCO of GIS solutions for industrial projects, for real-world critical applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using QGIS server

Kristianstad municipality in Sweden has since 2013 been using QGIS and QGIS Server as a base in our GIS platform. Our goal is to have a user friendly, yet powerful, set of applications from server via desktop and web to mobile applications. All based on open source. QGIS and QGIS server has several functions that makes it easier for both the users and administrators of the systems. That could be saving styles and attrib-ute forms to the database, styling and publish WMS and WFS directly from the desktop QGIS application. With a combination of different types of caching mechanisms we achieve fast and flexible services for our web applications. These open source projects, sMap and sMap-mobile, have also been designed to be fast, flexible and user friendly.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Development and Evolution of an open source mapping application within the USG <- Now with More Google Glass

The United States Government has a history of developing applications using legacy systems and continuing to use brittle software. This approach has managed to minimize data collection, sharing and use of open standards. With this in mind NGA has several groups focused on a rapid, innovative, and open approaches to application development. One of the recent applications developed in this fashion is the Mobile Analytic GEOINT Environment (MAGE), which evolved from earlier applications that were used for Disaster Response as well as various special events. Each of these earlier applications had their own strengths and weaknesses that were factored in during the development of MAGE. MAGE is built on an open source stack with a mobile and html5 application designed for geospatial data collection, imagery sharing, tracking, and communication. It is designed to be a lightweight, fully portable software stack that can be placed in front or behind firewalls with ease. It is fully customizable to a wide variety of mission needs so administrators can easily change the data collection parameters. MAGE is fully service enabled allowing easy access to the data via REST requests and returns multiple formats including GeoJSON, KML, and Shapefile to ensure ease of access and sharing. The app has also been ported to Google Glass for field collection and enhanced visualization.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Scaling for NYC while Tracking Plows

In the winter of 2012, NYC's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) was tasked with developing an application to track snow vehicle operations. The DoITT GIS team was given a mandate to have the application in production before the end of the winter. Due to the aggressive schedule, our approach was to get something up as quickly as possible while enhancing and improving over time. Beyond the schedule constraint, additional challenges were minimal requirements and decision-making by committee with no clear business owner.Three major tasks were required to complete the project: scale the existing infrastructure to better handle the expected demand, determine an approach for communicating the information to the public in a legible and understandable way, and develop and test the application. The team quickly undertook a multi-pronged approach to complete these tasks within a roughly two-month timeframe.Of all the impossible tasks, scaling the infrastructure was the most challenging and difficult. High-profile application launches in NYC that come with press announcements tend to garner traditional and social media coverage and with that national exposure and demand. And although the application would have been a perfect candidate to deploy in the cloud, that was not an option. Additional servers were added and the application was optimized and tuned for performance. To do so, multiple-layers of caching were employed including GeoWebCache and a Content Delivery Network. In terms of visualizing the data, we conducted a quick review of existing public-facing applications. There were not many examples at the time with most cities choosing to show 'breadcrumbs' of a plow's path. We felt this method was not an effective way of conveying plow coverage; our objective being, to show which streets had been plowed and not to show where a plow had been at specific time. As such, we decided on visualizing the data by the time a street was last plowed. Five time-buckets were established and the street segments were color-coded based on the last GPS ping received on the segment. Every 15 minutes an ETL pulls the GPS data and renders tiles using GeoServer and GeoWebCache.The application, PlowNYC, was developed using open source and commercial software and custom code. These include OpenLayers, Geoserver, GeoWebCache, GeoTools and Oracle. Since its release, the application has been enhanced to handle greater traffic, support mobile clients and to simplify the interface. The presentation will cover these aspects of the project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Client-side versus server-side geoprocessing: Benchmarking the performance of web browsers processing geospatial data using common GIS operations.

Are web browsers ready to handle a larger portion of the processing load in our GIS applications? Web-based GIS and mapping applications are traditionally based on a client-server model, where most of the data processing work is placed on the server. This study examines what happens when that processing load is shifted to the client, using JavaScript to process geospatial data with GIS operations directly in the browser.The time needed to complete common GIS tasks using the JavaScript library JSTS Topology Suite were benchmarked in popular web browsers including Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari. The GIS operations buffer, union, and Voronoi diagram were tested with a suite of points, lines, and polygons ranging in size from 10 up to 100,000 vertices. The testing platforms included Windows, Mac, and Linux desktops and laptops.The same geoprocessing tests were conducted on a cloud-based Linux server using the Java library JTS Topology Suite as a performance comparison of server-side processing applications. The various testing configurations were then analyzed to see how browsers stack up to the performance of traditional client-server applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS in the Browser - The Good Parts

Long gone (hopefully) are the days of replicating the "professionals only" desktop GIS interface in a browser. However, with modern browsers, HTML5 APIs, and increased efficiency of javascript engines it is possible to performantly replicate GIS functionality in a purely client-side browser application. Moderately complex geoprocessing, persistent client-side storage and simple to complex data visualization are all possible now. We walk through the underlying technology and demonstrate the practical use of it in an open-source sample application. Technologies covered include IndexedDB, WebStorage, Workers, Strongly Typed Arrays and Canvas. Some attention will also be paid to performance limitations, browser support and polyfills for older browsers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Supporting Open Data with Open Source

Within the US Federal Government, there is a trend towards embracing the benefits of open data to increase transparency and maximize potential innovation and resulting economic benefit from taxpayer investment. Recently, an Executive Order was signed specifically requiring federal agencies to provide a public inventory of their non-restricted data and to use standard web-friendly formats and services for public data access. For geospatial data, popular free and open source software packages are ideal options to implement an open data infrastructure. NOAA, an agency whose mission has long embraced and indeed centered on open data, has recently deployed or tested several FOSS products to meet the open data executive order. Among these are GeoServer, GeoNode, and CKAN, or Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network, a data management and publishing system.This talk will focus on how these three FOSS products can be deployed together to provide an open data architecture exclusively built on open source. Data sets hosted in GeoServer can be cataloged and visualized in GeoNode, and fed to CKAN for search and discovery as well as translation to open data policy-compliant JSON format. Upcoming enhancements to GeoNode, the middle tier of the stack, will allow integration with data hosting backends other than GeoServer, such as Esri's ArcGIS REST services or external WMS services. We'll highlight NOAA's existing implementation of the above, including the recently-deployed public data catalog, https://data.noaa.gov/, and GeoServer data hosting platform, as well as potential build out of the full stack including the GeoNode integration layer.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Building Open Source Projects in Government Esri Ecosystems

The challenges that are most commonly discussed by proponents of open source in government technology relate to changing the culture among technical staff and explaining the value of open tools and systems. But beyond the political concerns and misperceptions, there are practical complications in implementing these tools inside proprietary tech ecosystems like Esri. Although it's becoming easier, injecting open source into the Esri stack can be convoluted, to say the least.For all of its challenges, however, there have been many successful open source implementations in all levels of government, from open data portals to full-scale applications. Using case studies from recent Code for America projects, this talk will identify some of the more difficult challenges and highlight a few techniques for integrating open source geo tools into the Esri stack with a focus on minimizing difficulty for the developer and maximizing benefit for the end user. The talk will focus on web applications and tools while touching on data interoperability, spatial analysis, and trainings/documentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Trusting the Crowd in a Geospatial Crowdsourcing Application

Crowdsourcing is known as a way to gather information and data from the general public. In last few years crowdsourcing has become the cheapest and one of the most efficient ways to gather data. With the increased availability of smartphones and smart devices, the general public carries a communication device with increasing computational resources, which can also carry a lot of information. With Web 2.0 the access to internet has become simpler and easier.The crowdsourcing application, we have developed is a rating system that incorporates trust into the application. It works by gathering data of the busyness of hangout places from the crowd, specified in terms of a rating of the busyness of the establishment. The data gathered is shown back to the public using modified ratings and the trustworthiness of those ratings. Ratings are shown in real-time and on a map. The end-user platform for which the application is built includes Android and the web.HTML5 and PHP have been used for designing the main web page which works on any end user platform. JavaScript is used to display base maps from OpenStreetMap and Google servers.PHPMyAdmin is used to manage the MySQL Database. Java was used to program the front end of the application.The dots on the map range from small to large, with a small icon indicating a quiet place and the largest icon indicating a busy place. The trust rating shows our confidence in the rating of busyness, using an algorithm that produces a result ranging from 0% to 100%.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
08:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Small town GIS - Leveraging GitHub, QGIS and community members to manage local data

Langley is a small rural community on Whidbey Island in Washington State. Like so many other small rural communities, Langley is faced with limited resources but a great need to better understand the geospatial context of the local environment. Through the use of open source tools, including QGIS, GDAL/OGR, PostGIS, GRASS, and others, as well as free open data hosting at GitHub, Langley has started to better leverage existing data and attract community members to participate in gathering new and useful data. Small scale "civic hacking" is alive and well... and provides opportunities and challenges that are both similar and different than that of the larger urban counterparts engaged in large scale civic hacking.This talk with go over the technical aspects of the workflows that have proven fruitful for engaging local community members of small rural communities in both data creation and curation. We will also look at the social aspects of getting local governments engaged in the process of leveraging community resources for open access to data and tools.https://github.com/langleywa
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS in Node.js

An overview or GIS tools in server side JavaScript covering turf, proj4js, topojson, mbtiles and integration with Node.js idea like streams.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)