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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to MapGuide

This class is for those who want to fast-track into installing and using MapGuide Open Source. MapGuide Server and Web Extensions are set up in the Workshop (Windows). MapGuide Maestro (Windows) is used to load and connect to GIS data, create layers, author maps and publish web sites.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Advanced CartoCSS Techniques

CartoCSS is becoming an ever more popular Ð and ever more powerful Ð tool for cartographic and data styling. In this talk, Stamen designers and technologists will present some tips and tricks to make your next design sing. Tips and tricks covered include, but will not be limited to: pixelation, use of dingbat fonts for texture and markers, post-facto label adjustment, alternate uses for text symbolization, where to find and use entropy, blending, and geometry manipulation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer #ProTips

MapServer is a fast, flexible and extremely powerful tool for creating dynamic maps for the Web. Underneath the hood, MapServer offers many powerful and advanced features that many users never dig into, and new features are being added constantly. Come learn about some of the more advanced features of MapServer, from heat maps to 3D WFS services to exporting data to GDAL file formats to very complex symbology and labeling. Learn simple and advanced use cases and debugging techniques for some of these advanced features from two presenters with over 20 years combined experience of using MapServer. A live MapServer instance will be used during this presentation (yes we are crazy!).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
30:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geospatial-Semantic Knowledge Management and Linked Data for Humanitarian Assistance

The challenges to sharing knowledge during humanitarian events are well documented. Of these, the lack of effective and meaningful communication between all actors in an event is the root cause of many of the inefficiencies that hinder the ultimate goal of relieving suffering and rebuilding societies. This presentation outlines an approach for applying semantic knowledge management, ontological rules, and Linked Data approaches to address these issues. We introduce semLayer, a geospatially-enabled Semantic MediaWiki prototype application with mobile and wiki-based collection components, built using open source constituent technologies. We will discuss specifically the integration of PostGIS as a data store, and how this approach compares to open source triples stores/frameworks (e.g. Apache Jena) that perform geospatial operations using the GeoSPARQL specification. We will then move into considerations of integrating micro-, domain-, and upper-ontologies and vocabularies, and defining rules that govern relationships between data and entities, including geospatial attributes. We will close with a discussion of contributing to a disaster response use case with a Linked Data approach.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Do This, and also That: Integrating Open Source tools into traditional GIS shops"

This talk is intended for GIS users & managers who may be interested in open source GIS but aren't sure what the advantages to them might be, or who think Open Source GIS is nice in principle but are afraid there's no space for it in their workplace. In general, "Do This, and also That..." wants to address concerns of professionals who aren't sure how or why to make the leap from traditional/proprietary GIS tools into the wide world of Open Source GIS.Drawing from my own experiences, my goal is to gently present an integrated approach to open source GIS. This is not an "all or nothing" scenario: I want to show the audience how effective workflow solutions can involve both open source GIS as well as "traditional" proprietary GIS they are familiar with.I will briefly discuss common issues faced by GIS users, and explore the benefits of integrating open-source based workflows alongside proprietary GIS. I will cover use-cases for Leaflet and OpenLayers, OGR2OGR, PostGIS, and QGIS. Each use-case will demo a quick and friendly example of how a particular real-world issue might be addressed by the inclusion of one of these open source options into an existing GIS stack.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tilez: serving seamless polygons in the browser with TopoJSON and Node.js

This talk will introduce the Tilez project, which provides aNode.js-based realisation of a Tile Map Service tiles in both GeoJSON andTopoJSON formats. This formats provide a seamless and highly performant usermapping experience in both OpenLayers and Leaflet.The key to fast display of vector geometries in Tilezz lies in the use oftiles, which leverage both local and server-side caching. Whilst linear features lend themselves easily to tiling, polygons have traditionally represented more of a challenge.Tilez provides further efficiencies by using TopoJSON as a transport formatbetween the server and the client. Tilez implements all these improvements to support web-based vector tiling, delivering good performance under heavy load through Node,js and CouchDB-based caching, and efficient transport through TopoJSON. This talk will cover Tilez and the practical aspects of its implementation together with use cases from the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN - www.aurin.org.au).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Supporting Open Data with Open Source

Within the US Federal Government, there is a trend towards embracing the benefits of open data to increase transparency and maximize potential innovation and resulting economic benefit from taxpayer investment. Recently, an Executive Order was signed specifically requiring federal agencies to provide a public inventory of their non-restricted data and to use standard web-friendly formats and services for public data access. For geospatial data, popular free and open source software packages are ideal options to implement an open data infrastructure. NOAA, an agency whose mission has long embraced and indeed centered on open data, has recently deployed or tested several FOSS products to meet the open data executive order. Among these are GeoServer, GeoNode, and CKAN, or Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network, a data management and publishing system.This talk will focus on how these three FOSS products can be deployed together to provide an open data architecture exclusively built on open source. Data sets hosted in GeoServer can be cataloged and visualized in GeoNode, and fed to CKAN for search and discovery as well as translation to open data policy-compliant JSON format. Upcoming enhancements to GeoNode, the middle tier of the stack, will allow integration with data hosting backends other than GeoServer, such as Esri's ArcGIS REST services or external WMS services. We'll highlight NOAA's existing implementation of the above, including the recently-deployed public data catalog, https://data.noaa.gov/, and GeoServer data hosting platform, as well as potential build out of the full stack including the GeoNode integration layer.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adding value to Open Data using Open Source GIS.

New Zealand, like many other countries around the world, is developing Government policies requiring open access to public data. The National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has been directed to make subtantial parts of its fisheries, climate, coastal, oceanic and freshwater data more publicly available for re-use. NIWA recognises that making such data available is of very limited value, if potential users do not have access to suitable tools to work with these data, ie: GIS applications. As part of its Open Data programme, NIWA's Fisheries and Environmental Centers have funded enhancements to an Open Source GIS application, QGIS, and made this application available as a free download, along with NIWA data. This approach enables the effective re-use of NIWA (and other agencies') environmental and spatial data by individuals and organisations who otherwise have little or no access to commercial GIS tools. This presentation discusses the value of Open Source (and Open Standards) to support Open Data initiatives, and NIWA's experiences along the way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A Complete Multi-Modal Carpooling and Route Planning Solution

Sustainable transportation is a nice idea but can be hard to apply in real life to your daily commute to work or school. For many it involves multiple transportation modes and it can be a challenge to combine the time tables from multiple sources in order to plan the most efficient route. We took the challenge and worked with stakeholders from the Saguenay region to build a portal that provides a simple yet really optimal way to get around in both urban and rural areas be it by bus, bike, share taxi and even carpooling or by combining multiple modes in order to promote sustainable transport. The system built on pgRouting, PostGIS, Django and OpenLayers3 allows users to register offers or search for the best available match in existing offers, comparing and combining as well with city buses and all your other favorite transportation options. It is a solution that will help and inspire city planners or city transport organizations to bring all their transportation systems together to get people moving the right way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Repurposing OpenTripPlanner for Ride Sharing

OpenTripPlanner is an open source application for building multi-modal itineraries using OpenStreetMap data about walking and driving routes and General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data for public transit data. With some creative adjustments, OpenTripPlanner can also be used to generate itineraries for ride sharing based on a pool of existing rides.This talk will demonstrate taking advantage of OpenTripPlanner's flexibility in this fashion. The example of repurposing OpenTripPlanner will serve as the basis for a more general discussion of ways that functionality relating to geospatial data can be reused in unanticipated ways.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adopting OGC Standards in a Flood Alert System

This presentation is about the adoption of the OGC - Open Geospatial Consortium standards in Sao Paulo Flood Alert System which was based on matrix coordinates and static maps.The Flood Alert System has more than 300 telemetric stations composed by rain gauges, water level sensors placed on rivers and reservoirs, water quality sensors, weather stations and a S-band weather radar reaching 240 kilometers of scanning range. The system offers Real Time support for a large metropolitan area and its Emergency Centers, Civil Defense groups, Government, Service companies and general public.We have integrated Geotools (for data conversion), Geoserver (services like WMS, WFS), DB2, OpenStreetMap, uDig, Quantum GIS and some other softwares in our architecture. This set of tools provides many possibilities to easily integrate our data with other systems and external data, like some Hydraulic and Hydrological models that return geospacial data with flooding area forecast and vulnerable buildings.Talking about the architecture, the adoption process, some of the issues, apllied solutions and further development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
39:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Web and mobile enterprise applications

This presentation will discuss enterprise web mapping and mobile applications that we've been developing for large utilities and communications companies, based on a number of open source geospatial components, including PostGIS, MapFish, GeoServer and Leaflet. It will discuss development of offline mobile applications using both PhoneGap to compile to native applications on Android, iOS and Windows, using a SpatiaLite database, and also use of HTML5 offline storage. We will discuss ideas on how to create extremely easy to use but still powerful applications, using approaches inspired by consumer web mapping sites rather than traditional GIS. The presentation will not be deeply technical but will include material of interest to developers as well as end users and managers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:03 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer Project Update - Introducing Version 7.0

This session will begin with a status update for the MapServer project - current and future directions. Focus will then shift to the main features and enhancements coming in MapServer 7.0 including dynamic heatmaps, WFS 2.0 support, UTFGrid generation and more. Finally we'll finish with a discussion of contribution opportunities for interested developers and users.This a great opportunity to chat with the members of the MapServer project team!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Writing better PostGIS queries

This presentation will demonstrate ways to take most advantage of spatial indexes, SQL constructs, and PostGIS specific functions. For these exercises we'll be using PostGIS 2.1+ and PostgreSQL 9.3+ . We'll demonstrate common cases people often do inefficiently.This presentation demonstrates the following1) Various SQL constructs including ANTI join, LEFT, RIGHT, EXISTS, LATERAL, CASE clauses, aggregates2) What common table expressions (CTEs) are and when to and when not to use them3) We'll demonstrate these concepts in use in a couple of common spatial query problems - e.g. proximity analysis (both geometry and geography), raster analysis and generation, aggregation of data based on various attributes, other correlation queries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Spatial-Temporal Prediction of Climate Change Impacts using pyimpute, scikit-learn and GDAL

As the field of climate modeling continues to mature, we must anticipate the practical implications of the climatic shifts predicted by these models. In this talk, I'll show how we apply the results of climate change models to predict shifts in agricultural zones across the western US. I will outline the use of the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Scikit-Learn (sklearn) to perform supervised classification, training the model using current climatic conditions and predicting the zones as spatially-explicit raster surfaces across a range of future climate scenarios. Finally, I'll present a python module (pyimpute) which provides an API to optimize and streamline the process of spatial classification and regression problems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tuning Open Source GIS Tools to Support Weather Data / Rapidly Changing Rasters

The National Weather Service is developing several geospatial forecast visualization and analysis tools. The back end data store and WMS server is built on Open Source GIS tools: GDAL, PostGIS / Raster, Mapserver, and Mapcache.Weather forecasts are in a constant state of flux. In the case of the National Digital Forecast Database, forecasts expire or are superseded every hour. This presents several challenges when it comes to managing forecast rasters with GIS tools, and delivering the most up-to-date, real-time forecasts with an acceptable level of performance. This presentation will examine the methods and practices we've used to optimize our data store performance, from data ingest to forecast analysis to image delivery.* Using PostgreSQL Inheritance / Parent and Child tables to manage raster updates inside the database* Managing an up-to-date image cache in Mapcache and Memcached, with rapidly changing source data.* Optimizing PostGIS raster tiles and Mapserver DATA queries for faster image generation and display over Google Maps* Future work: Expanding PostgreSQL Inheritance to work with raster overviews
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OnEarth: NASA's Boundless Solution to Rapidly Serving Geographic Imagery

OnEarth is an open source software package that efficiently serves georeferenced raster imagery with virtually zero latency, independent of image size or spatial resolution. The key to OnEarth's speed lies in the use of a unique, multi-resolution file format (Meta Raster Format, or MRF) combined with supporting open source software packages such as the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Apache to serve out images via web service protocols such as Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) and Tiled Web Map Service (TWMS), or visualization formats such as Keyhole Markup Language (KML). The emphasis on performance and scalability were strong drivers for developing this specialized package versus using existing software.While OnEarth is currently deployed operationally at several institutions, powering applications across the Earth Science and planetary spectrum, its active development is managed by NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) project. The purpose of GIBS is to provide a complementary historical and near real time (NRT) image archive to NASA's Earth Science data products for a multitude of uses: GIS ingestion, first responder and NRT applications, data search and discovery, decision support, education and outreach.Released as open source to GitHub in October 2013, NASA is encouraging members of the open source community to participate in the evolution of OnEarth—in the roles of developers, evaluators, and users—as a means to vet and enhance its capabilities. This leveraging of efforts not only benefits those who intend to use the software for their own endeavors, it effectively contributes back to NASA by strengthening GIBS and promoting the use and understanding of NASA's vast archive of science imagery and data. Several tools, including the GIBS reference client, Worldview, will be demonstrated as part of this presentation to illustrate the breadth of application and consistent image access speed across installations.https://github.com/nasa-gibs/onearth
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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TeachOSM

For the past three years Nuala Cowan & Richard Hinton of the Geography department at the George Washington University have integrated the open source mapping platform, OpenStreetMap into the curriculum for their introductory undergraduate Geographical Information Systems (GIS) & Cartography classes; traditionally the domain of desktop, proprietary software. Professors Cowan and Hinton have sought to expand the traditional curriculum, and expose students to various different open source software's, web based platforms, and data collection initiatives, specifically in a service-learning environment.In collaboration with both local & international partners (American Red Cross 2012, USAID 2014), GW Geography students have used high-resolution satellite imagery to trace road and building infrastructure (Columbia & Indonesia 2012, Kathmandu 2013, Philippines & Zimbabwe 2014), data that is subsequently used to support disaster preparedness efforts.Initiated by a small innovative teaching grant we have started work with OpenStreetMap foundation to develop a web site that would allow other instructors to replicate our mapping assignment specific to their particular discipline and curricular needs. This site is called TeachOSM.org. Our funding has since been matched by the World Bank, USAID (OTI and The Geocenter), the State Department and The American Red Cross. With this funding the scope of the project has been expanded to include the redevelopment of the OSM Tasking manager. The OSM Tasking Manager is a custom-mapping tool that facilitates collaborative mapping projects with a humanitarian focus. The purpose of the tool is to divide a mapping job into individual smaller tasks for group work, while guaranteeing coverage and minimizing overlap. New additions to the Tasking Manager will allow instructors to assign cells to individual students for both data creation, and data validation roles.Mapping has applicability across many fields and communities of interest, and can used to document, archive, plan and contribute to both local and international initiatives.Open source mapping modules and assignments are also a unique way to integrate service-learning strategies in course curriculum, while exposing students to new and exciting technological platforms. The experience teaches civic responsibility and the value of collaborative efforts in the global community.The collaborative mapping initiatives at GWU Geography have been exclusively disaster related to date, as this coincides with the research interests of the faculty involved. We believe this instructional module/assignment is applicable to many disciplines and teaching scenarios, and the objective of the TeachOSM platform is to open that possibility to these other fields, in a comprehensive user friendly way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source Geospatial Production of United States Forest Disturbance Maps from Landsat Time Series

The North American Forest Dynamics (NAFD) project is completing nationwide processing of historic Landsat data to provide annual, wall-to-wall analysis of US disturbance history over nearly the last three decades. Because understanding the causes of disturbance (e.g., harvest, fire, stress) is important to quantifying carbon dynamics, work was conducted to attribute causal agents to the nationwide change maps. This case study describes the production of disturbance agent maps at 30-m resolution across 434 Landsat path/rows covering the conterminous US. Geoprocessing was based entirely on open source software implemented at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility. Several classes of predictor variables were developed and tested for their contribution to classification models. Predictors included the geometric attributes of disturbance patches, spectral indices, topographic metrics, and vegetation types. New techniques based on shape-restricted splines were developed to classify patterns of spectral signature across Landsat time series, comprising another class of predictor variables. Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and the R statistical software were used extensively in all phases of data preparation, model development, prediction, and post-processing. Parallel processing on the Pleiades supercomputer accommodated CPU-intensive tasks on large data volumes. Here we present our methods and resultant 30-m resolution maps of forest disturbance and causes for the conterminous US, 1985 Ð 2011. We also discuss the computing approach and performance, along with some enhancements and additions to open source geospatial packages that have resulted.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An Easy Web Mapping Framework

Browser technologies such as HTML, JavaScript and CSS have matured to a point where they can be used to develop sophisticated applications. Spatial JavaScript libraries such as OpenLayers, JSTS and D3 supply great capability for implementing mapping and graphing applications. Complex geoprocessing functions such as geocoding, routing and surface analysis can now be accessed easily via REST API's.These technologies provide a powerful set of tools for building the next generation of client-side web mapping applications. But this tool set is complex, and requires significant effort in UI design to make it accessible to users. The BC Government Natural Resource Sector (NRS) deploys over a hundred web mapping applications. Implementing these applications using one-off designs would be prohibitively costly in development, support and training. This talk discusses the development of a Common Web Mapping framework based on OpenLayers 2, which uses the power of modern browser technology to provide a fast and easy way to build web mapping applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PyWPS - 4 project report

PyWPS is one of the first implementations of OGC Web Processing Service (OGC WPS 1.0.0) on the server-side, using Python programming language. Since it's beginning in 2006 it was offering support for running scripts of GRASS GIS and other popular libraries, such as R, GDAL, Proj4 and other. Users of PyWPS can write their server-side geo-scripts and interface them on the internet using standard WPS interface.During last two years, PyWPS development team was discussing new features, users would like to see in this popular OGC WPS Server implementation. Users were missing for example proper support for multiple in- and outputs, advanced logging, more natural serializing, possibility to store big data to external services. PyWPS was never validating properly input data, as long as underlying libraries were able to read them.Also new versions of nearly everything are at hand - Python 3, GRASS GIS 7 with proper Python support, Fiona, Shapely, no need to write custom code, when OWSLib is around. New formats are now used for sharing of raster and vector data, for example Geo- and TopoJSON. They can be even validated, using json-schema. Python became The geo-scripting language since 2006 (now being slowly replaced by JavaScript).Current work on PyWPS 4 is split into several fields: New WSGI interface was written, using Werkzeug. PyWPS has now new core for in- and output data structures (LiteralData and ComplexData). New IOHandler base object can seamlessly switch between file-, stream-like- and in-memory objects.PyWPS - 4 contains validators of input complex data, which uses four-level of validation (None, mime-type based, "can read GDAL", schema validation) for XML-based format (like GML) but also for JSON-based formats (like GeoJSON). Literal data are validated on similar way.We are going to support MapServer, Geoserver and QGIS MapServer in the future for output complex data management and serving. Data are going to be stored in storages (new abstract class defined), which currently is file system based by now, but can be extend to remote storage (such as FTP or e.g. Dropbox), or to database servers. Possibilities of WPS-T are discussed as well.PyWPS - 4 will remain the old PyWPS, how our users do like it: small, fast to install and configure, fast to run. But with new features at hand, we will provide you with modern, safe, scalable tool, which you can use to interface the work of yours on the internet.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Evaluation of Web Processing Service Frameworks

In this presentation, I illustrate, and discuss initial results from a quantitative analysis of the performance of WPS servers. To do so, two test scenarios were used to measure response time, response size, throughput, and failure rate of five WPS servers including 52¡North, Deegree, GeoServer, PyWPS, and Zoo. I also assess each WPS server in terms of qualitative metrics such as software architecture, perceived ease of use, flexibility of deployment, and quality of documentation. A case study addressing accessibility assessment is used to evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of each implementation, and point to challenges experienced while working with these WPS servers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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TileMill and the Tower of Prince Henry, Reversed

Programs that generate map tiles default to generating tiles for abounding box whose dimensions are fixed up and down the zoom stack. Butthe overarchingly common use case calls this default behavior intoquestion. If the ultimate goal of a map is to lock down the display of afeature at a high zoom level, then any tile outside of the invertedpyramid whose truncated top bounds the feature at the desired zoom levelis extraneous, unnecessary.Inspired by a game of marbles that uses a similar shape in its playing,I call this truncated, inverted pyramid the "Tower of Prince Henry,Reversed"[1], and abbreviate it TOPHR.This presentation describes modifications to TileMill, the same strategyimplemented directly through Mapnik XML, the use of the flexible mbtileformat to store the generated tiles, and presents several measures ofthe resulting savings (tile generation time, number of tiles, diskspace). I'll also describe a plug in for Leaflet and an approach forOpenLayers that ensures that map users cannot stray outside the boundsof TOPHR.1. It's also reminiscent of the name of a real album by The Fall or an unreal tarot card.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)