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32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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projections in web browsers are terrible and you should be ashamed of yourself

The JavaScript port of proj4 was (relatively) recently moved from subversion to github and updated to use modern build tools.The talk will discuss some of the differences between desktop and web environments when it comes to projections and CRS, other new projects that take a different perspective on projections (like topojson), and why you can't just use an EPSG number in your browser (and should be ashamed of yourself wanting to).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoMOOSE at 10 Years

GeoMOOSE released its very first version in 2005. At nearly 10 years old the project has continued to hold on to its original developers and many of its foundation users. Over that lifespan the project has allowed the development team to observe struggles in changing technology, attitudes, and the dedication required to keep such an open source project relevant as it ages.Nearly 10 years worth of dirty laundry will be aired! And a preview of GeoMOOSE 3.0 ideas! And slides with exclamation points!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Making Space for Diverse Mappers

<p>Diverse communities provide the space for different points of view to find voice. Historically open source communities have balanced the contribution of various perspectives and expertises. We are often industry examples of remote cultural collaboration. But the nature of collaboration is changing, where diversity must stretch further across geographies to foster a wider scope of difference. One that includes the other sides of privileged space. In this session, I will present on why ideological diversity can be at the forefront of community structures by introducing three personal cornerstones - Mapzen, Maptime, and GeoNYC. This interactive session highlights how embracing a range of cultural perspectives and technical expertise allows communities to create the unexpected. We'll review success and challenges while performing our own mini GeoNYC complete with 3-word introductions and mapping fun. </p>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tilez: serving seamless polygons in the browser with TopoJSON and Node.js

This talk will introduce the Tilez project, which provides aNode.js-based realisation of a Tile Map Service tiles in both GeoJSON andTopoJSON formats. This formats provide a seamless and highly performant usermapping experience in both OpenLayers and Leaflet.The key to fast display of vector geometries in Tilezz lies in the use oftiles, which leverage both local and server-side caching. Whilst linear features lend themselves easily to tiling, polygons have traditionally represented more of a challenge.Tilez provides further efficiencies by using TopoJSON as a transport formatbetween the server and the client. Tilez implements all these improvements to support web-based vector tiling, delivering good performance under heavy load through Node,js and CouchDB-based caching, and efficient transport through TopoJSON. This talk will cover Tilez and the practical aspects of its implementation together with use cases from the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN - www.aurin.org.au).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Scaling for NYC while Tracking Plows

In the winter of 2012, NYC's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) was tasked with developing an application to track snow vehicle operations. The DoITT GIS team was given a mandate to have the application in production before the end of the winter. Due to the aggressive schedule, our approach was to get something up as quickly as possible while enhancing and improving over time. Beyond the schedule constraint, additional challenges were minimal requirements and decision-making by committee with no clear business owner.Three major tasks were required to complete the project: scale the existing infrastructure to better handle the expected demand, determine an approach for communicating the information to the public in a legible and understandable way, and develop and test the application. The team quickly undertook a multi-pronged approach to complete these tasks within a roughly two-month timeframe.Of all the impossible tasks, scaling the infrastructure was the most challenging and difficult. High-profile application launches in NYC that come with press announcements tend to garner traditional and social media coverage and with that national exposure and demand. And although the application would have been a perfect candidate to deploy in the cloud, that was not an option. Additional servers were added and the application was optimized and tuned for performance. To do so, multiple-layers of caching were employed including GeoWebCache and a Content Delivery Network. In terms of visualizing the data, we conducted a quick review of existing public-facing applications. There were not many examples at the time with most cities choosing to show 'breadcrumbs' of a plow's path. We felt this method was not an effective way of conveying plow coverage; our objective being, to show which streets had been plowed and not to show where a plow had been at specific time. As such, we decided on visualizing the data by the time a street was last plowed. Five time-buckets were established and the street segments were color-coded based on the last GPS ping received on the segment. Every 15 minutes an ETL pulls the GPS data and renders tiles using GeoServer and GeoWebCache.The application, PlowNYC, was developed using open source and commercial software and custom code. These include OpenLayers, Geoserver, GeoWebCache, GeoTools and Oracle. Since its release, the application has been enhanced to handle greater traffic, support mobile clients and to simplify the interface. The presentation will cover these aspects of the project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Real-time Scenario Planning with OpenLayers

Area-based planning processes are rapidly moving from paper and desktop GIS based processes to online applications offering real-time analysis and feedback. Users want an interactive and informative experience allowing them to generate reports and analysis without needing to understand the subtleties of GIS or spatial analysis. They expect a compelling user experience that works on a variety of platforms Ð ranging from old or outdated browsers to tablets and smart phones.Building from years of experience (and standing on many shoulders), this talk demonstrates some of the strategies and techniques achieved for the Marine Planner platform, an online open-source map viewer and decision support tool. These strategies include UTFGrids, tile caching, pre-processing, and standard and forked OpenLayer libraries, among others. The result is large-scale scenario planning tools with a responsive and compelling user-experience that anyone who has used online maps can figure out.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Empowering people, popularizing open source, and building a business

Vizzuality went from a data communications consulting company to the creator of one of today's most popular online mapping frameworks, CartoDB. Four years ago, we recognized a major problem in open source geospatial tools, they were still prohibitively difficult to use to creating dynamic, interactive, and beautiful online maps. That was when we decided to build CartoDB, a mix of existing open source software such as PostGIS and our own new code. Each account on CartoDB represents a new PostGIS enabled database, a new user of libraries such as Leaflet, and we hope, a long-time supporter of open source. In this talk, I'll present on how we are building a new and quickly growing community around open source geospatial. I'll talk about our plans for the future and how we plan to support open source for many years to come.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using OpenStreetMap Infrastructure to Collect Data for our National Parks

The National Park Service has many well-known sites, but many parks do not have the GIS resources to maintain their map data. The Places project aims to solve this problem by empowering non-technical park employees and the public with the ability to make changes to the map. The Places project uses custom versions of existing OpenStreetMap tools for data collection and uses them to create an up-to-date base map for National Park web sites. This presentation will discuss how we plan to motivate mappers, how we deal with data validation, and how we plan to continue working with OpenStreetMap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Developing Tools for Humanitarian Decision Making

The American Red Cross International Services Department (ISD) and project partners are developing a web visualization tool (Mapfolio) to help to visualize Red Cross's disaster response and humanitarian projects around the world. The solution uses innovative Node.js ETL processing to process information from the Red Cross Salesforce Information Management platform. The Mapfolio is open source built on Node.js, Angular, Leaflet, PostGIS, and a custom PGRestAPI (Chubbs). Other technical advances include a custom Leaflet clipped-polygon labeling as well as a map-view-dependent (not zoom level dependent) display of global administrative boundaries. This session will not only walk through the open source components but will also focus on how the Red Cross defined clear deliverables and scaled-up its support of free and open source software.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoScript - A Geospatial Swiss Army Knife

GeoScript adds spatial capabilities to dynamic scripting languages that run on the JVM. With implementations in Python, JavaScript, Scala, and Groovy, GeoScript provides an interface to the powerful data access, processing and rendering functionality of the GeoTools library.GeoScript provides concise and simple apis that allow developers to perform tasks quickly making it a great tool for the day to day data juggling that comes with geopspatial data. This talk will focus mainly on real world examples that showcase the power of the library.Come check this talk out if you are interested in learning about a new tool to add to your geospatial hacking toolbox. Maybe you have tried to use GeoTools but find it too difficult and complex to use. Or perhaps your java skills are not where you would like them to be. If that is the case this talk, and GeoScript, might be just what you are looking for.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
39:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Web and mobile enterprise applications

This presentation will discuss enterprise web mapping and mobile applications that we've been developing for large utilities and communications companies, based on a number of open source geospatial components, including PostGIS, MapFish, GeoServer and Leaflet. It will discuss development of offline mobile applications using both PhoneGap to compile to native applications on Android, iOS and Windows, using a SpatiaLite database, and also use of HTML5 offline storage. We will discuss ideas on how to create extremely easy to use but still powerful applications, using approaches inspired by consumer web mapping sites rather than traditional GIS. The presentation will not be deeply technical but will include material of interest to developers as well as end users and managers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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24-hr Latency End to End Data Processing Using Open Source Technologies for the Airborne Snow Observatory

JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory is an integrated imaging spectrometer and scanning LIDAR for measuring mountain snow albedo, snow depth/snow water equivalent, and ice height (once exposed), led by PI Dr. Tom Painter. The team recently wrapped our second "Snow On" campaign where over a course of 3 months, we flew the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir; focusing initial on the Tuolumne, and then moving to weekly flights over the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado.To meet the needs of its customers including Water Resource managers who are keenly interested in Snow melt, the ASO team had to develop and end to end 24 hour latency capability for processing spectrometer and LIDAR data from Level 0 to Level 4 products. Fondly referring to these processing campaigns as "rodeos" the team rapidly constructed a Big Data open source data processing system at minimal cost and risk that not only met our processing demands, but taught the entire team many lessons about remote sensing of snow and dust properties, algorithm integration, the relationship between computer scientists, and snow hydrologist; flight and engineering teams, geographers, and most importantly lessons about camaraderie that will engender highly innovative and rapid data systems development, and quality science products for years to come.Chris Mattmann, Paul Ramirez, and Cameron Goodale for the ASO project will present this talk and will detail the story of the Compute processing capability on behalf of the larger team, highlighting contributions of its key members along the way. We will cover the blending of open source technologies and proprietary software packages that have helped us attain our goals and discuss areas that we are actively investigating to expand our use of open source.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Creating Custom HTML Elements for Maps

Maps appear all over the web but the core structural language of the web—HTML—does not natively support them. Adding dynamic or interactive maps to a web page or web application can involve complex JavaScript code that is difficult to reuse between contexts.Web developers are starting to have opportunities to change this. Some newer web development frameworks are designed to support HTML page elements with custom attributes as a way of defining behaviors. These frameworks anticipate web components, an emerging standard for creating fully custom HTML tags. Custom attributes and elements make it possible to effectively expand HTML to include `...`.This talk will demonstrate how to use existing JavaScript map libraries to create flexible, reusable maps that take the form of HTML elements with custom attributes. Looking forward, we'll explore how web components let us take this technique even further and create true custom HTML elements for maps and the display of other geo data.Crafting custom HTML map elements doesn't just mean making maps a first-class citizen of web page markup, it offers a whole new way to create and share web-based mapping tools between applications and organizations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Writing better PostGIS queries

This presentation will demonstrate ways to take most advantage of spatial indexes, SQL constructs, and PostGIS specific functions. For these exercises we'll be using PostGIS 2.1+ and PostgreSQL 9.3+ . We'll demonstrate common cases people often do inefficiently.This presentation demonstrates the following1) Various SQL constructs including ANTI join, LEFT, RIGHT, EXISTS, LATERAL, CASE clauses, aggregates2) What common table expressions (CTEs) are and when to and when not to use them3) We'll demonstrate these concepts in use in a couple of common spatial query problems - e.g. proximity analysis (both geometry and geography), raster analysis and generation, aggregation of data based on various attributes, other correlation queries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenDroneMap

Aimed at developers and end-users, this presentation will cover the current state-of-the-art of OpenDroneMap, toolkit of FOSS computer vision tools aiming to be easy to use for referencing unstructured photos into geography data (colorized point clouds, referenced photos, orthophotos, surface models and more), whether the images be sourced from street level photos, building interiors, or from sUASs (drones).Currently no such comprehensive FOSS toolkit exists and is easy to use and install. ODM aims to fill this gap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The unrelenting progress of design in open source

Open source geospatial is in an Enlightenment era regarding design; many teams are breaking away from tradition and embracing simple, clean, and usable interfaces. For a long time though, open source geospatial software, and geospatial software in general, seemed to pay little attention to the knowledge of the design community. Here, I will discuss why design has taken a backseat for such a long history and what is suddenly changing that brings it to the forefront. I will also talk some about the design decisions that have gone into the CartoDB user interface and many of the mapping options we help our users find. This talk will focus both on the history of design in open source geospatial software and where it is heading in the future. We will also talk about how design itself is inherently open and how we are working to improve open source software design through our own contributions and through this discussion of our process.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Finding the Where in Big Fuzzy Data

We've gone to plaid. It is now easier to store any and all information that we can because it might be useful later. Like a data hoarder, we would rather keep everything than throw any of it away. As a result, we now are knee-deep in bits that we are not quite sure are useful or meaningful. Fortunately, there is now a mature, and growing, family of open-source tools that make it straight-forward to organize, process and query all this data to find useful information. Hadoop has been synonymous with, and arguably responsible for, the rise of 'The Big Data'. But it's not your grandfather's mapreduce framework anymore (ok, in internet time). There are a number of open-source frameworks, tools, and techniques that are emerging that each provide a different speciality when managing and process fast, big, voracious data streams.As a Geo-community we understand the potential for location to be the common context through which we can combine disparate information. In large amounts of data with wide variety, location enables us to discover correlations that can be amazing insights that otherwise were lost when looking through our pre-defined and overly structured databases. And by using modern big data tools, we can now rapidly process queries which means we can experiment with more ideas in less time.This talk will share open-source projects that geo-enable these big data frameworks as well as use case examples of how they have been used to solve unique and interesting problems that would have taken forever to run or may not have even been possible.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Next Generation of Printed Maps

Mapfish-print is a library and web-application for printing maps and reports using data from multiple online web mapping solutions like WMS, WMTS, OSM, WFS, GeoJson, etc... The project is now nearly a decade old and is being used by a large number of websites. However, there are limitations to the original design, including the inability to have more than one map in a page, limited formatting and output restricted to PDF (in practical terms).Mapfish-print V3 is the result of a major change in the underlying implementation. Thanks to integration with Jasper Reports and the new pluggable architecture the new version of Mapfish print is more powerful, flexible and scalable than ever before.This talk will be targeted at the primarily website developers and managers will look at: * The new features present in the new version * How to use the new features * How to use the report designer * Examples of advanced formatting * How to upgrade from previous versions * The design decisions that allow mapfish-print to be a more scalable solution * A very high level look at the ways the application can be extended by a developer for a specific vertical
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:55 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fixing GIS Data Discovery

Discovery of GIS data is broken. It is overly complicated and incomplete. Organizations spend time and money on creation and acquisition of data, yet it sits on hard drives, dvd's, and shelves without a straightforward way for others to discover it. Discovery tools that do exist have usability issues which alienate users and prevent wide adoption. Too often, data discovery is an afterthought, grafted onto tools that have been designed for analysis, or treated as one feature among many in a map portal. Thus these tools attempt to serve every possible user need and in the process become unusable. Simply put, we need an application which enables discovery of GIS data with an emphasis on user experience, integrates seamlessly with other tools, and streamlines the use and organization of geospatial data.We present GeoBlacklight, a collaboratively designed and developed open source software focused on discovery use cases. The project builds on existing, widely adopted open source projects. GeoBlacklight fills the gap in discovery tools for geospatial data by providing a simple, yet powerful intuitive interface. To reach this goal, Stanford University embarked upon a comprehensive design process. Our process includes an environmental scan, stakeholder interviews, user interviews, inter-institutional collaboration, and rapid prototyping. We will present the user personas that have been distilled from our interviews, the user stories and feature prioritization process these inform, and prototypes of the software we have developed so far, as well as plans for future development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)