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32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to MapGuide

This class is for those who want to fast-track into installing and using MapGuide Open Source. MapGuide Server and Web Extensions are set up in the Workshop (Windows). MapGuide Maestro (Windows) is used to load and connect to GIS data, create layers, author maps and publish web sites.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Advanced CartoCSS Techniques

CartoCSS is becoming an ever more popular Ð and ever more powerful Ð tool for cartographic and data styling. In this talk, Stamen designers and technologists will present some tips and tricks to make your next design sing. Tips and tricks covered include, but will not be limited to: pixelation, use of dingbat fonts for texture and markers, post-facto label adjustment, alternate uses for text symbolization, where to find and use entropy, blending, and geometry manipulation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Web Mapping: An educational resource for creating online maps using free and open source software

Free and open source software (FOSS) for GIS continues to increase in functionality and usability, and offers a flexible and economic option for organization that want to create online maps; however, beginners face a broad array of software choices and may not know which FOSS products and packages to deploy in each tier of the web map architecture. Compounding the problem is the fact that much documentation for FOSS GIS is fragmented among these tier-specific products and does not provide end-to-end workflows for designing and publishing cartographic web services and assembling them into an online map product. In response to these needs, The Pennsylvania State University has introduced an open online course entitled Open Web Mapping. The course lessons explain the theory and architecture of web mapping, while walking beginners through the process of deploying online maps with FOSS. Software such as QGIS, GDAL, GeoServer, TileMill, and OpenLayers is introduced as students start from the data processing stage and work their way to the final display of interactive web service layers in a browser-based map. The course is intended as an open resource for the entire FOSS community; therefore, the lesson materials are freely accessible through a Creative Commons license.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer #ProTips

MapServer is a fast, flexible and extremely powerful tool for creating dynamic maps for the Web. Underneath the hood, MapServer offers many powerful and advanced features that many users never dig into, and new features are being added constantly. Come learn about some of the more advanced features of MapServer, from heat maps to 3D WFS services to exporting data to GDAL file formats to very complex symbology and labeling. Learn simple and advanced use cases and debugging techniques for some of these advanced features from two presenters with over 20 years combined experience of using MapServer. A live MapServer instance will be used during this presentation (yes we are crazy!).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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UrbanSim2: Simulating the Connected Metropolis

<style type="text/css"><!--td br --></style>UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatial simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.<style type="text/css"><!--td br -->UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatialå simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.--></style>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNetwork opensource 3.0

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. GeoNetwork opensource 3.0 comes with a new, clean user interface based on AngularJS, Bootstrap and D3. Other topics presented are related to performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will also be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals as well as work for Environment Canada and the collaboration with the OpenGeoPortal project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Development and Evolution of an open source mapping application within the USG <- Now with More Google Glass

The United States Government has a history of developing applications using legacy systems and continuing to use brittle software. This approach has managed to minimize data collection, sharing and use of open standards. With this in mind NGA has several groups focused on a rapid, innovative, and open approaches to application development. One of the recent applications developed in this fashion is the Mobile Analytic GEOINT Environment (MAGE), which evolved from earlier applications that were used for Disaster Response as well as various special events. Each of these earlier applications had their own strengths and weaknesses that were factored in during the development of MAGE. MAGE is built on an open source stack with a mobile and html5 application designed for geospatial data collection, imagery sharing, tracking, and communication. It is designed to be a lightweight, fully portable software stack that can be placed in front or behind firewalls with ease. It is fully customizable to a wide variety of mission needs so administrators can easily change the data collection parameters. MAGE is fully service enabled allowing easy access to the data via REST requests and returns multiple formats including GeoJSON, KML, and Shapefile to ensure ease of access and sharing. The app has also been ported to Google Glass for field collection and enhanced visualization.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A jumpstart for your mobile map app

Would you like to get started programming mobile mapping applications? There's a lot to keep in mind: a responsive layout, a mapping framework, positioning of controls and buttons, offline caching of tiles, and finally compiling it all into a mobile app.This presentation walks you through some problems and solutions, culminating in MobileMapStarter. Techniques discussed include jQuery Mobile, Leaflet, and PhoneGap/Cordova.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Managing public data on GitHub: Pay no attention to that git behind the curtain

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) continuously solicits feedback on transportation data from local government partners. Historically, this process has taken the form of lots of markings on plotted maps with immeasurable amounts of manual work on the tail end to organize and interpret this feedback. Many tools developed specifically for this process today often fall short of the needs of agencies (such as geospatial presentation and tracking comments), yet the cost to develop or implement custom software is generally out of reach for government agencies.This presentation introduces a case study of the process to develop geospatial collaboration tools for managing transportation data directly hosted on GitHub pages (currently in development at http://atlregional.github.io/plan-it/ and http://atlregional.github.io/fc-review/). This approach was partially inspired by GitHub's recent features additions that make collaborating on geospatial data simple and elegant. Because these data span both functional and jurisdictional divisions, many of the greatest challenges have been project management related --- coordinating stakeholder feedback and project requirements. However, by utilizing the existing git/GitHub infrastructure, many of these requirements can be managed cost effectively. Moreover, the framework allows for direct integration with other application environments via the GitHub API and GDAL Tools, ensuring that local modifications to project data are committed back to the data repository.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:11 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An Open Source Approach to Communicating Weather Risks

Weather data is a critical element in the decision making process for a vast number of entities and its timely and accurate portrayal is essential. The U.S. National Weather Service has utilized a combination of Open Source projects including: OpenLayers, Qooxdoo, PostGIS and Flot among others to create a mash-up called the Enhanced Data Display or EDD (preview.weather.gov/edd) to promote the development of a Weather Ready Nation. The EDD provides a platform to quickly communicate past, current and future weather conditions. What happens over the next couple of hours to a week dictates the agenda of everything from strategic resource placement to what to wear to work. More often than not, the weather forecast is not binary - there is always some probabilistic component that results from the inherent chaos of a 4-D fluid wrapped around a spinning sphere. Luckily, the EDD makes use of a variety of techniques that leverage Open Source technologies to present forecasts in both deterministic and probabilistic forms. The EDD contains many visual displays that refine bulky meteorological datasets into palatable forms. Whether you are looking to see what hazards you may face along a travel route or trying to find a heat map of how many people will be impacted by a tornado warning, the EDD can display this quickly. Finally, the ability to combine EDD layers with your own data makes this an extremely powerful application. EDD is a good example of how leveraging Open Source resources can result in an exquisite product.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using OpenStreetMap Infrastructure to Collect Data for our National Parks

The National Park Service has many well-known sites, but many parks do not have the GIS resources to maintain their map data. The Places project aims to solve this problem by empowering non-technical park employees and the public with the ability to make changes to the map. The Places project uses custom versions of existing OpenStreetMap tools for data collection and uses them to create an up-to-date base map for National Park web sites. This presentation will discuss how we plan to motivate mappers, how we deal with data validation, and how we plan to continue working with OpenStreetMap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adopting OGC Standards in a Flood Alert System

This presentation is about the adoption of the OGC - Open Geospatial Consortium standards in Sao Paulo Flood Alert System which was based on matrix coordinates and static maps.The Flood Alert System has more than 300 telemetric stations composed by rain gauges, water level sensors placed on rivers and reservoirs, water quality sensors, weather stations and a S-band weather radar reaching 240 kilometers of scanning range. The system offers Real Time support for a large metropolitan area and its Emergency Centers, Civil Defense groups, Government, Service companies and general public.We have integrated Geotools (for data conversion), Geoserver (services like WMS, WFS), DB2, OpenStreetMap, uDig, Quantum GIS and some other softwares in our architecture. This set of tools provides many possibilities to easily integrate our data with other systems and external data, like some Hydraulic and Hydrological models that return geospacial data with flooding area forecast and vulnerable buildings.Talking about the architecture, the adoption process, some of the issues, apllied solutions and further development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
39:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Web and mobile enterprise applications

This presentation will discuss enterprise web mapping and mobile applications that we've been developing for large utilities and communications companies, based on a number of open source geospatial components, including PostGIS, MapFish, GeoServer and Leaflet. It will discuss development of offline mobile applications using both PhoneGap to compile to native applications on Android, iOS and Windows, using a SpatiaLite database, and also use of HTML5 offline storage. We will discuss ideas on how to create extremely easy to use but still powerful applications, using approaches inspired by consumer web mapping sites rather than traditional GIS. The presentation will not be deeply technical but will include material of interest to developers as well as end users and managers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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24-hr Latency End to End Data Processing Using Open Source Technologies for the Airborne Snow Observatory

JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory is an integrated imaging spectrometer and scanning LIDAR for measuring mountain snow albedo, snow depth/snow water equivalent, and ice height (once exposed), led by PI Dr. Tom Painter. The team recently wrapped our second "Snow On" campaign where over a course of 3 months, we flew the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir; focusing initial on the Tuolumne, and then moving to weekly flights over the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado.To meet the needs of its customers including Water Resource managers who are keenly interested in Snow melt, the ASO team had to develop and end to end 24 hour latency capability for processing spectrometer and LIDAR data from Level 0 to Level 4 products. Fondly referring to these processing campaigns as "rodeos" the team rapidly constructed a Big Data open source data processing system at minimal cost and risk that not only met our processing demands, but taught the entire team many lessons about remote sensing of snow and dust properties, algorithm integration, the relationship between computer scientists, and snow hydrologist; flight and engineering teams, geographers, and most importantly lessons about camaraderie that will engender highly innovative and rapid data systems development, and quality science products for years to come.Chris Mattmann, Paul Ramirez, and Cameron Goodale for the ASO project will present this talk and will detail the story of the Compute processing capability on behalf of the larger team, highlighting contributions of its key members along the way. We will cover the blending of open source technologies and proprietary software packages that have helped us attain our goals and discuss areas that we are actively investigating to expand our use of open source.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoExt2 Ð Past, Present and Future

GeoExt is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha.Version 2 of GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/, released in October 2013) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and is built atop the newest official installments of its base libraries; OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 4.2.1.The talk of two GeoExt core developers and members of the PSC (Project Steering Committee) will shortly present the history of the project with a focus on how an international code sprint back in May 2012 lay the foundations of the 2.x-series of GeoExt. The current version will be presented and and we'll discuss new features and important changes for users of the framework. Especially the following aspects will be portrayed:- Usage of the new classes- Compatibility with the single-file build tool of Sencha- Integration into the ExtJS MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture- Better API-documentation- Easier theming of ExtJS/GeoExt applicationsAs both of the base libraries are about to release new major versions Ð OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 5 are very near to be being released in stable versions Ð the last focus of the talk will be the future development of the GeoExt 2 framework.The project has already pre-evaluated the possibility of supporting more than just one mapping library, so a future version of GeoExt might bring support for OpenLayers 3 and/or Leaflet and is likely being built on top of ExtJS 5.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Distributed Versioned Editing in Action

The concept of distributed versioned editing has been instantiated as GeoGit (http://geogit.org). This talk is about the practical application of both the concept and the software to empower people to collaboratively develop geospatial information in distributed and sometimes disconnected environments. The ROGUE team used GeoNode, GeoGit, and the OpenGeo Suite to provide a collaborative editing environment that maintains provenance of the data. The discussion will include an overview of how the technology is being used operationally in Honduras and for risk assessment and response. What worked, what didn't, and where can we take this next. I'll give you my opinion and I'd love to hear yours
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OnEarth: NASA's Boundless Solution to Rapidly Serving Geographic Imagery

OnEarth is an open source software package that efficiently serves georeferenced raster imagery with virtually zero latency, independent of image size or spatial resolution. The key to OnEarth's speed lies in the use of a unique, multi-resolution file format (Meta Raster Format, or MRF) combined with supporting open source software packages such as the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Apache to serve out images via web service protocols such as Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) and Tiled Web Map Service (TWMS), or visualization formats such as Keyhole Markup Language (KML). The emphasis on performance and scalability were strong drivers for developing this specialized package versus using existing software.While OnEarth is currently deployed operationally at several institutions, powering applications across the Earth Science and planetary spectrum, its active development is managed by NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) project. The purpose of GIBS is to provide a complementary historical and near real time (NRT) image archive to NASA's Earth Science data products for a multitude of uses: GIS ingestion, first responder and NRT applications, data search and discovery, decision support, education and outreach.Released as open source to GitHub in October 2013, NASA is encouraging members of the open source community to participate in the evolution of OnEarth—in the roles of developers, evaluators, and users—as a means to vet and enhance its capabilities. This leveraging of efforts not only benefits those who intend to use the software for their own endeavors, it effectively contributes back to NASA by strengthening GIBS and promoting the use and understanding of NASA's vast archive of science imagery and data. Several tools, including the GIBS reference client, Worldview, will be demonstrated as part of this presentation to illustrate the breadth of application and consistent image access speed across installations.https://github.com/nasa-gibs/onearth
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Building development environments using Vagrant

Building development environments using VagrantDuring Oskari.org development we noticed releases usually where delayed due to environment differences. Our desktop and server environments are quite different. We believe there should be no differences between the production and development environments. In our research we discovered Vagrant, which utilizes Virtualbox for creating virtual environments. It was a perfect solution and we wondered into the world of DevOps. We noticed our lack of automation and began our search for a good Configuration Management tool. Our research showed many promising alternatives and we ended up choosing Ansible. Armed with Vagrant and Ansible we began to automate our development environment in a reproducible way. This talk is about our journey into DevOps and why you should join us!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapStory: The next plateau

MapStory.org is a community-driven open educational resource that lets people share and peer review observations about how the world evolves over time and space. It's built on an open source geospatial stack (PostGIS, GeoServer, OpenLayers, GeoNode) and aims to empower both authoritative and public participation in data collection, peer review, and storytelling. We want to use this session to debut a "new plateau" for MapStory that includes an updated user interface with new features, namely integration of GeoGit Ôcrowdediting' of data and XYT frames for MapStories (what we call StoryBoxes).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vert.x - web sockets and async programming for everyone

You have started to hear about micro-services, evented asynch servers, and WebSockets but then you hear the only platform that really has those now is Node.JS. While you like JavScript you would like to use other languages. Well Vert.x has all these features AND runs JavaScript, Java, Scala, Python, Ruby, CoffeeScript, and Groovy. You don't have to be a Node.JS hipster to have all the fun - though JavaScript is fine if you roll that way. This talk will cover a basic introduction to Vert.x and it's architecture. Then I will will show how I built a WebSocket asset tracking application with Leaflet and a Vert.x backend application. The goal is at the end you can go home and start writing your own, scalable, (a)synchronous, WebSocket applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source Work-flow for Surface Interpolation with Curvilinear Anisotropy

Traditional approaches to interpolating a surface from point samples often assume that if anisotropy is present in the data, it is along a straight line. However, this assumption breaks down for many data-sets, such as river bathymetry, elevations near coastlines, or levels of pollutants along roads. I will present a work-flow using open source tools to make use of the curvilinear anisotropy present in many data-sets by transforming the curved data-set into a straight line (QGIS and PostGIS), applying an interpolation to the transformed data (SAGA, GRASS, or other program with interpolation tools), and finally re-bending the interpolated surface back to the data's original shape (PostGIS).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping with AngularJS

AngularJS is rapidly gaining popularity and favor in the front-end web development community. Several open-source AngularJS wrappers exist for open and closed source web mapping libraries. This session will survey the landscape of existing mapping library wrappers. Wrappers for OpenLayers, Leaflet, d3, Google Maps, and Esri WebMaps will be examined. Comparisons of the different abilities of these wrappers and the techniques required when using them will be examined. Advantages, strengths, weaknesses, limitations, and "gotchas" will all be examined for the AngularJS interfaces of the different mapping libraries. Attendees should leave the session with an understanding how to best integrate their mapping library of choice within an AngularJS application and how they could help improve these various wrappers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)