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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Advanced CartoCSS Techniques

CartoCSS is becoming an ever more popular Ð and ever more powerful Ð tool for cartographic and data styling. In this talk, Stamen designers and technologists will present some tips and tricks to make your next design sing. Tips and tricks covered include, but will not be limited to: pixelation, use of dingbat fonts for texture and markers, post-facto label adjustment, alternate uses for text symbolization, where to find and use entropy, blending, and geometry manipulation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Serving high-resolution sptatiotemporal climate data is hard, let's go shopping

The world is a big place and time is infinite. Scientists who study any aspect of the Earth's climate are immediately faced with the exponentially growing amount of data that are required to represent properties of the climate in both time and space. The bulk of these data is a substantial barrier to extracting meaningful information from their contents. This barrier can be prohibitive to smaller-scale researchers and communities that want to study and understand the impact of the climate on their localities. Fortunately, a substantial amount of free and open source software (FOSS) exists upon which one can build a great geospatial data application.The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC), a regional climate services provider in British Columbia, Canada, has been making a concerted effort to use geospatial FOSS in order to expand the availability, comprehensibility and transparency of big climate data sets from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiment. With a full stack of geospatial FOSS and open protocols we have built and deployed a web platform capable of visualizing and distributing high-resolution spatiotemporal raster climate data.Our web application consists of:+ back-end storage with raw NetCDF4/HDF5 files+ a PostgreSQL/PostGIS database for indexed metadata+ ncWMS for maps and visualization+ the PyDAP OPeNDAP server for data requests+ a web user interface to tie it all togetherThis presentation will provide a case study for enabling scientific collaboration using FOSS and open standards. We will describe our application architecture, present praise for and critique of the components we used, and provide a detailed discussion of the components that we had to improve or write ourselves. Finally, though our use case is specific to climate model output, we will provide some commentary as to how this use case relates to other applications of spatiotemporal data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Web Mapping: An educational resource for creating online maps using free and open source software

Free and open source software (FOSS) for GIS continues to increase in functionality and usability, and offers a flexible and economic option for organization that want to create online maps; however, beginners face a broad array of software choices and may not know which FOSS products and packages to deploy in each tier of the web map architecture. Compounding the problem is the fact that much documentation for FOSS GIS is fragmented among these tier-specific products and does not provide end-to-end workflows for designing and publishing cartographic web services and assembling them into an online map product. In response to these needs, The Pennsylvania State University has introduced an open online course entitled Open Web Mapping. The course lessons explain the theory and architecture of web mapping, while walking beginners through the process of deploying online maps with FOSS. Software such as QGIS, GDAL, GeoServer, TileMill, and OpenLayers is introduced as students start from the data processing stage and work their way to the final display of interactive web service layers in a browser-based map. The course is intended as an open resource for the entire FOSS community; therefore, the lesson materials are freely accessible through a Creative Commons license.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Gimme some YeSQL ! - and a GIS -

So long NoSQL, here is YeSQL !Not long ago, PostgreSQL was the the most advanced OpenSource relational database. With the latest version 9.4, it became an over-powerful mutant : the most advanced OpenSource Object-Oriented relational and/or non-relational, Spatial, SQL and/or NoSQL database. For the sake of simplicity, let us call it a YeSQL database.This presentation will introduce you to the feature galore of PostgreSQL, giving insights into the latest improvements from a user point of view. Of course some GIS inclination will drive this talk, and show you how you can take advantage of spatial extensions together with PostgreSQL core features.PostgreSQL 9.4 is an important milestone for various reason : a lot of new outstanding features, and core improvements which prefigure a whole world of new use cases. The main feature from a user perspective, giving PostgreSQL this YeSQL title, is probably the new JSONB storage. A fine marriage between the Hstore extension and JSON support, it literally transforms PostgreSQL into a document database (think MongoDB in PostgreSQL without data losses).We will therefore present great PostgreSQL 9.4 features, and some ways to use them with spatial data, leveraging the latest PostGIS and PointCloud extensions :* Exclusion constraints* KNN search* Lateral joins* Window functions* (writeable) (recursive) CTE* Automatic updateable views* Materialized views* JSON, more JSON, JSON indexing, JSON proceduresÉ* Foreign Data Wrappers* Logical decoding and future applications* More JSON ? GeoJSON ?The feature set available to PostgreSQL users is growing with every release, as are performances. And the spatial part of it is not lagging behind. It is a must-use platform for data management, data infrastructures. And a GIS.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Fast Big Data?" A High-Performance System for Creating Global Satellite Image Time Series

Description:We describe a system that transforms sequences of MODIS images covering the entire Earth into time-optimized data cubes to provide rapid access to time series data for various applications.Abstract:Satellite time series data are key to global change monitoring related to climate and land cover change. Various research and operational applications such as crop monitoring and fire history analysis rely on rapid access to extended, hyper-temporal time series data. However, converting large volumes of spatial data into time series and storing it efficiently is a challenging task. In order to solve this Big Data problem, CSIR has developed a system which is capable of automated downloading and processing of several terabytes of MODIS data into time-optimized "data cubes." This time series data is instantly accessible via a variety of applications, including a mobile app that analyzes and displays 14 years of vegetation activity and fire time series data for any location in the world. In this presentation we will describe the implementation of this system on a high-performance Storage Area Network (SAN) using open source software including GDAL and HDF5. We discuss how to optimally store time series data within HDF cubes, the hardware requirements of working with data at this scale as well as several challenges encountered. These include writing high-performance processing code, updating data cubes efficiently and working with HDF data in a multi-threaded environment. We conclude by showing visualizations of our vegetation and burned area time series data in QGIS, web apps, and mobile apps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Manager's Guide to PostGIS

Your staff keep talking about this "PostGIS" thing, but what is it? Does anyone (important) else use it? What for?This talk gives a brief overview of the place of PostGIS in spatial IT architecture, how PostGIS compares to proprietary alternatives, who is using PostGIS, and how organizations transition to open source databases.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoServer Feature Frenzy

What can you do with this GeoServer thing? This talk covers some of the basic (and not so basic) ways to use GeoServer to publish your geospatial data and make it look great!GeoServer made its first release in 2001 and has grown into an amazing, capable and diverse program. This also means the "feature list" is spread over years of release announcements, presentations, mailing list archives!This presentations provides a whirlwind tour of GeoServer and everything it can do today!This talk is a visual guide to the features of GeoServer. Are you just getting started with GeoServer, or considering it for the first time? Attend this talk and prioritize what you want to look into first. Are you an expert user who has been running GeoServer since Java 1.4? Attend this talk and see what tricks an optimisations you have been missing out on!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using QGIS server

Kristianstad municipality in Sweden has since 2013 been using QGIS and QGIS Server as a base in our GIS platform. Our goal is to have a user friendly, yet powerful, set of applications from server via desktop and web to mobile applications. All based on open source. QGIS and QGIS server has several functions that makes it easier for both the users and administrators of the systems. That could be saving styles and attrib-ute forms to the database, styling and publish WMS and WFS directly from the desktop QGIS application. With a combination of different types of caching mechanisms we achieve fast and flexible services for our web applications. These open source projects, sMap and sMap-mobile, have also been designed to be fast, flexible and user friendly.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exploring Openness in Geospatial Education

This panel discussion will explore efforts to embed openness into geospatial education, including courses on open geospatial solutions as well as innovative teaching methods that help expand the audience who can engage with open geospatial systems such as MOOCs and open courseware.Panelists include Robert Cheetham (Azavea), Sara Safavi (RackSpace), Nuala Cowan (George Washington University), and Calvin Metcalf (AppGeo).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Client-side versus server-side geoprocessing: Benchmarking the performance of web browsers processing geospatial data using common GIS operations.

Are web browsers ready to handle a larger portion of the processing load in our GIS applications? Web-based GIS and mapping applications are traditionally based on a client-server model, where most of the data processing work is placed on the server. This study examines what happens when that processing load is shifted to the client, using JavaScript to process geospatial data with GIS operations directly in the browser.The time needed to complete common GIS tasks using the JavaScript library JSTS Topology Suite were benchmarked in popular web browsers including Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari. The GIS operations buffer, union, and Voronoi diagram were tested with a suite of points, lines, and polygons ranging in size from 10 up to 100,000 vertices. The testing platforms included Windows, Mac, and Linux desktops and laptops.The same geoprocessing tests were conducted on a cloud-based Linux server using the Java library JTS Topology Suite as a performance comparison of server-side processing applications. The various testing configurations were then analyzed to see how browsers stack up to the performance of traditional client-server applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A jumpstart for your mobile map app

Would you like to get started programming mobile mapping applications? There's a lot to keep in mind: a responsive layout, a mapping framework, positioning of controls and buttons, offline caching of tiles, and finally compiling it all into a mobile app.This presentation walks you through some problems and solutions, culminating in MobileMapStarter. Techniques discussed include jQuery Mobile, Leaflet, and PhoneGap/Cordova.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Building Open Source Projects in Government Esri Ecosystems

The challenges that are most commonly discussed by proponents of open source in government technology relate to changing the culture among technical staff and explaining the value of open tools and systems. But beyond the political concerns and misperceptions, there are practical complications in implementing these tools inside proprietary tech ecosystems like Esri. Although it's becoming easier, injecting open source into the Esri stack can be convoluted, to say the least.For all of its challenges, however, there have been many successful open source implementations in all levels of government, from open data portals to full-scale applications. Using case studies from recent Code for America projects, this talk will identify some of the more difficult challenges and highlight a few techniques for integrating open source geo tools into the Esri stack with a focus on minimizing difficulty for the developer and maximizing benefit for the end user. The talk will focus on web applications and tools while touching on data interoperability, spatial analysis, and trainings/documentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions.Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources.Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields.The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries.The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A Complete Multi-Modal Carpooling and Route Planning Solution

Sustainable transportation is a nice idea but can be hard to apply in real life to your daily commute to work or school. For many it involves multiple transportation modes and it can be a challenge to combine the time tables from multiple sources in order to plan the most efficient route. We took the challenge and worked with stakeholders from the Saguenay region to build a portal that provides a simple yet really optimal way to get around in both urban and rural areas be it by bus, bike, share taxi and even carpooling or by combining multiple modes in order to promote sustainable transport. The system built on pgRouting, PostGIS, Django and OpenLayers3 allows users to register offers or search for the best available match in existing offers, comparing and combining as well with city buses and all your other favorite transportation options. It is a solution that will help and inspire city planners or city transport organizations to bring all their transportation systems together to get people moving the right way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Shortest Path search in your Database and more with pgRouting

pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide shortest path search and other network analysis functionality.This presentation will show the inside and current state of the pgRouting development, from its wide range of shortest path search algorithms to driving distance calculation or "Traveling Sales Person" (TSP) optimization. Additionally we will give a brief outlook and introduction of upcoming new features like the Ê"Vehicle Routing Problem" (VRP) solver, and what we have in mind for future releases.We will explain the shortest path search in real road networks and how the data structure is important to get better routing results. Furthermore we will show how you can improve the quality of the search with dynamic costs and make the result look closer to the reality. You will also learn about difficulties and limitations of the library, and when pgRouting might not be not the right tool to solve your routing problem.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Developing Tools for Humanitarian Decision Making

The American Red Cross International Services Department (ISD) and project partners are developing a web visualization tool (Mapfolio) to help to visualize Red Cross's disaster response and humanitarian projects around the world. The solution uses innovative Node.js ETL processing to process information from the Red Cross Salesforce Information Management platform. The Mapfolio is open source built on Node.js, Angular, Leaflet, PostGIS, and a custom PGRestAPI (Chubbs). Other technical advances include a custom Leaflet clipped-polygon labeling as well as a map-view-dependent (not zoom level dependent) display of global administrative boundaries. This session will not only walk through the open source components but will also focus on how the Red Cross defined clear deliverables and scaled-up its support of free and open source software.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Crazy data: Using PostGIS to fix errors and handle difficult datasets

Inteligeo is a system that stores a lot of information used by the Brazilian Federal Police Forensics to fight crime, initially in the environmental arena with a later expansion to other types of crime. During the construction of the database a lot of problems appeared for which PostGIS was the key to the solution.This presentation describes problems encountered by the team while loading 850+ shapefiles into the database, linking with external databases and building 950+ views of the data.Although the content of the recipes is very technical, the general concepts will be explained in an accessible language and correlated to real world cases.Topics:*Definition of crazy data in our context*Quick recipes- Spike removal- Invalid geometry detection and fixing- Filling holes- Raster image footprints- Hammering data into correct topologies- Speeding data visualization with ST Simplify and PGSQL 9.3's materialized views- Rough georeferencing using an auxiliary table- Creating constraints*How is crazy data generated and our experience in handling each case- Large datasets- Lack of validation- Reprojection- Geometric operations- Topological errors- Imprecise definitions- Legacy databases- Bad georeferencingWe will also discuss why is handling crazy data important for the Brazilian Federal Police, our efforts in cleaning up data at the source and the implications of geographical data in general for fighting crime.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
39:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Web and mobile enterprise applications

This presentation will discuss enterprise web mapping and mobile applications that we've been developing for large utilities and communications companies, based on a number of open source geospatial components, including PostGIS, MapFish, GeoServer and Leaflet. It will discuss development of offline mobile applications using both PhoneGap to compile to native applications on Android, iOS and Windows, using a SpatiaLite database, and also use of HTML5 offline storage. We will discuss ideas on how to create extremely easy to use but still powerful applications, using approaches inspired by consumer web mapping sites rather than traditional GIS. The presentation will not be deeply technical but will include material of interest to developers as well as end users and managers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Choose your own Adventure - Open Source Spatial on OpenShift

Learn how to build quick and easy open source mapping solutions using several different languages and datastores. Well start by selecting our source data, and a database to house it. Then, we'll pick language and a simple microframework to power a basic REST API. Finally, we add Leaflet Maps for user-facing data visualization and controls. Feel free to bring a laptop and follow along to launch your very own mapping application during this short talk.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)