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32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A User-centered Design for Interactive Masking Capability within Web GIS

This presentation will discuss the design of interactive raster masking capability for a web-based geographic information system (Web GIS) from the perspective of user-centered design. A case study will be presented by analyzing and discussing specific aspects of the user-developer dialog within the context of the software development life cycle. The presented case study will take the audience through the development of an open-source Web GIS software architecture (MapServer, PostGIS and OpenLayers) with particular focus on how the masking functionality was designed and implemented. Software engineering techniques informed by iterative cognitive walkthrough allowed for a dialog between Web GIS production and consumption that led to a more usable and useful cartographic interface. Key findings from this case study will be presented.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exposing NASA's Earth Observations

The satellites which comprise NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) have a long history of capturing rich datasets with global coverage over extended periods of time. While the data itself is rich (and open!), it can be a daunting task for uninitiated users to find suitable datasets, learn the data format, and subsequently find interesting phenomena. Even for those who are familiar with the data, it can be a time consuming process. But thanks to the proliferation and maturity of open source geospatial software, NASA has been able to build an imagery ingest pipeline, open source tiled imagery server, and open source, web-based mapping client to encourage exploration and discovery of NASA datasets. This talk will describe how NASA is building these capabilities through the Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) and Worldview client, demonstrate how others are building upon them, and show what it takes to integrate NASA imagery into clients using the GIBS API.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
33:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Spatial in Lucene and Solr

Apache Lucene is a Java toolkit that provides a rich set of search capabilities such as keyword search, query suggesters, relevancy, and faceting. It also includes a spatial module for searching and sorting with geometric data using either a flat-plane model or a spherical model. The capabilities therein are leveraged to varying degrees by Apache Solr and ElasticSearch--the two leading search servers based on Lucene.In this talk I'm going to start by briefly covering some core features of this search platform so that the audience appreciates the unique role it plays in the crowded world of information-retrieval. I will then show examples of using some spatial features in Apache Solr such as:? indexing points, polygons, and other shapes into a Lucene document? filtering search results by a query shape, to include using different search predicates? sorting by distance between indexed points and a query pointNext I will review some spatial features in Lucene spatial and ElasticSearch such as:? sorting bounding boxes by overlap percentage with a query box? aggregating geohash grid counts for heatmapsThe talk will also note the internal architecture and dependencies of Lucene spatial, and discuss a key dependent library called Spatial4j. At the end of the talk I will note some limitations to be aware of, as well as planned improvements. Finally, key advances in geodesic (spherical geometry) information retrieval in Spatial4j will be highlighted.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Fast Big Data?" A High-Performance System for Creating Global Satellite Image Time Series

Description:We describe a system that transforms sequences of MODIS images covering the entire Earth into time-optimized data cubes to provide rapid access to time series data for various applications.Abstract:Satellite time series data are key to global change monitoring related to climate and land cover change. Various research and operational applications such as crop monitoring and fire history analysis rely on rapid access to extended, hyper-temporal time series data. However, converting large volumes of spatial data into time series and storing it efficiently is a challenging task. In order to solve this Big Data problem, CSIR has developed a system which is capable of automated downloading and processing of several terabytes of MODIS data into time-optimized "data cubes." This time series data is instantly accessible via a variety of applications, including a mobile app that analyzes and displays 14 years of vegetation activity and fire time series data for any location in the world. In this presentation we will describe the implementation of this system on a high-performance Storage Area Network (SAN) using open source software including GDAL and HDF5. We discuss how to optimally store time series data within HDF cubes, the hardware requirements of working with data at this scale as well as several challenges encountered. These include writing high-performance processing code, updating data cubes efficiently and working with HDF data in a multi-threaded environment. We conclude by showing visualizations of our vegetation and burned area time series data in QGIS, web apps, and mobile apps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoServer Feature Frenzy

What can you do with this GeoServer thing? This talk covers some of the basic (and not so basic) ways to use GeoServer to publish your geospatial data and make it look great!GeoServer made its first release in 2001 and has grown into an amazing, capable and diverse program. This also means the "feature list" is spread over years of release announcements, presentations, mailing list archives!This presentations provides a whirlwind tour of GeoServer and everything it can do today!This talk is a visual guide to the features of GeoServer. Are you just getting started with GeoServer, or considering it for the first time? Attend this talk and prioritize what you want to look into first. Are you an expert user who has been running GeoServer since Java 1.4? Attend this talk and see what tricks an optimisations you have been missing out on!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNetwork opensource 3.0

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. GeoNetwork opensource 3.0 comes with a new, clean user interface based on AngularJS, Bootstrap and D3. Other topics presented are related to performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will also be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals as well as work for Environment Canada and the collaboration with the OpenGeoPortal project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Development and Evolution of an open source mapping application within the USG <- Now with More Google Glass

The United States Government has a history of developing applications using legacy systems and continuing to use brittle software. This approach has managed to minimize data collection, sharing and use of open standards. With this in mind NGA has several groups focused on a rapid, innovative, and open approaches to application development. One of the recent applications developed in this fashion is the Mobile Analytic GEOINT Environment (MAGE), which evolved from earlier applications that were used for Disaster Response as well as various special events. Each of these earlier applications had their own strengths and weaknesses that were factored in during the development of MAGE. MAGE is built on an open source stack with a mobile and html5 application designed for geospatial data collection, imagery sharing, tracking, and communication. It is designed to be a lightweight, fully portable software stack that can be placed in front or behind firewalls with ease. It is fully customizable to a wide variety of mission needs so administrators can easily change the data collection parameters. MAGE is fully service enabled allowing easy access to the data via REST requests and returns multiple formats including GeoJSON, KML, and Shapefile to ensure ease of access and sharing. The app has also been ported to Google Glass for field collection and enhanced visualization.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenLayers 3: a unique mapping library

We've rewritten OpenLayers from the ground up with the goal of offering a powerful, high-performance library leveraging the latest in web technologies. This talk will present the latest advances of the library, focusing on aspects that make OpenLayers 3 stand out. OpenLayers 3, for example, uses technologies, techniques and algorithms that enable high-quality and high-performance vector rendering. Come learn about the optimizations and techniques OpenLayers 3 uses internally, and how you can leverage them in your next web-mapping applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A jumpstart for your mobile map app

Would you like to get started programming mobile mapping applications? There's a lot to keep in mind: a responsive layout, a mapping framework, positioning of controls and buttons, offline caching of tiles, and finally compiling it all into a mobile app.This presentation walks you through some problems and solutions, culminating in MobileMapStarter. Techniques discussed include jQuery Mobile, Leaflet, and PhoneGap/Cordova.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Supporting Open Data with Open Source

Within the US Federal Government, there is a trend towards embracing the benefits of open data to increase transparency and maximize potential innovation and resulting economic benefit from taxpayer investment. Recently, an Executive Order was signed specifically requiring federal agencies to provide a public inventory of their non-restricted data and to use standard web-friendly formats and services for public data access. For geospatial data, popular free and open source software packages are ideal options to implement an open data infrastructure. NOAA, an agency whose mission has long embraced and indeed centered on open data, has recently deployed or tested several FOSS products to meet the open data executive order. Among these are GeoServer, GeoNode, and CKAN, or Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network, a data management and publishing system.This talk will focus on how these three FOSS products can be deployed together to provide an open data architecture exclusively built on open source. Data sets hosted in GeoServer can be cataloged and visualized in GeoNode, and fed to CKAN for search and discovery as well as translation to open data policy-compliant JSON format. Upcoming enhancements to GeoNode, the middle tier of the stack, will allow integration with data hosting backends other than GeoServer, such as Esri's ArcGIS REST services or external WMS services. We'll highlight NOAA's existing implementation of the above, including the recently-deployed public data catalog, https://data.noaa.gov/, and GeoServer data hosting platform, as well as potential build out of the full stack including the GeoNode integration layer.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Empowering people, popularizing open source, and building a business

Vizzuality went from a data communications consulting company to the creator of one of today's most popular online mapping frameworks, CartoDB. Four years ago, we recognized a major problem in open source geospatial tools, they were still prohibitively difficult to use to creating dynamic, interactive, and beautiful online maps. That was when we decided to build CartoDB, a mix of existing open source software such as PostGIS and our own new code. Each account on CartoDB represents a new PostGIS enabled database, a new user of libraries such as Leaflet, and we hope, a long-time supporter of open source. In this talk, I'll present on how we are building a new and quickly growing community around open source geospatial. I'll talk about our plans for the future and how we plan to support open source for many years to come.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
08:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Small town GIS - Leveraging GitHub, QGIS and community members to manage local data

Langley is a small rural community on Whidbey Island in Washington State. Like so many other small rural communities, Langley is faced with limited resources but a great need to better understand the geospatial context of the local environment. Through the use of open source tools, including QGIS, GDAL/OGR, PostGIS, GRASS, and others, as well as free open data hosting at GitHub, Langley has started to better leverage existing data and attract community members to participate in gathering new and useful data. Small scale "civic hacking" is alive and well... and provides opportunities and challenges that are both similar and different than that of the larger urban counterparts engaged in large scale civic hacking.This talk with go over the technical aspects of the workflows that have proven fruitful for engaging local community members of small rural communities in both data creation and curation. We will also look at the social aspects of getting local governments engaged in the process of leveraging community resources for open access to data and tools.https://github.com/langleywa
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:11 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An Open Source Approach to Communicating Weather Risks

Weather data is a critical element in the decision making process for a vast number of entities and its timely and accurate portrayal is essential. The U.S. National Weather Service has utilized a combination of Open Source projects including: OpenLayers, Qooxdoo, PostGIS and Flot among others to create a mash-up called the Enhanced Data Display or EDD (preview.weather.gov/edd) to promote the development of a Weather Ready Nation. The EDD provides a platform to quickly communicate past, current and future weather conditions. What happens over the next couple of hours to a week dictates the agenda of everything from strategic resource placement to what to wear to work. More often than not, the weather forecast is not binary - there is always some probabilistic component that results from the inherent chaos of a 4-D fluid wrapped around a spinning sphere. Luckily, the EDD makes use of a variety of techniques that leverage Open Source technologies to present forecasts in both deterministic and probabilistic forms. The EDD contains many visual displays that refine bulky meteorological datasets into palatable forms. Whether you are looking to see what hazards you may face along a travel route or trying to find a heat map of how many people will be impacted by a tornado warning, the EDD can display this quickly. Finally, the ability to combine EDD layers with your own data makes this an extremely powerful application. EDD is a good example of how leveraging Open Source resources can result in an exquisite product.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Repurposing OpenTripPlanner for Ride Sharing

OpenTripPlanner is an open source application for building multi-modal itineraries using OpenStreetMap data about walking and driving routes and General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data for public transit data. With some creative adjustments, OpenTripPlanner can also be used to generate itineraries for ride sharing based on a pool of existing rides.This talk will demonstrate taking advantage of OpenTripPlanner's flexibility in this fashion. The example of repurposing OpenTripPlanner will serve as the basis for a more general discussion of ways that functionality relating to geospatial data can be reused in unanticipated ways.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
17:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The best of both worlds: combining geometry and key-value stores using PostGIS and HStore

The "national geospatial foundation" of Norway consists of multiple semi-structured and semi-standardized thematic data sets made available in a variety of formats. Storing, extracting and performing lightweight analyses across the different data sets adds value and usefulness to the data sets, which is a prime motivation for releasing the data freely to the public. Earlier approaches have stored the different data sets in a traditional relational manner resulting in hundreds of Postgresql/PostGIS tables Ð some with dozens of attributes. Updating and querying the data sets becomes unnecessary complicated and often a tedious, manual task. In an effort to deal with these issues, we have looked at other ways of storing and querying the data. A schemaless storage mechanism, like NoSQL-databases, fits perfectly to the task. However, NoSQL-database implementations have major drawbacks related to geometry handling when compared with PostGIS. We wanted the geometry handling of PostGIS combined with the schemaless storage mechanisms of a NoSQL database. Postgresql fits this combination perfectly with PostGIS' handling of geometry and HStores handling of key-value stores. HStore is an extension that implements a binary data type in Postgresql that allow storing an arbitrary number of key-value pairs. In contrast to the JSON data type, HStore enable indexing on the key-value stores. Combining PostGIS geometry with HStore's key-value storage for non-geometry attributes was a perfect match for storing the highly varying data sets. The flexibility gain is tremendous and a huge success allowing our data developers to find new ways of combining and making value of the data sets. Future work on the JSONB data type will combine the benefits of both the HStore and the JSON data type, enabling solutions that are even more advanced as well as bridging the gap between NoSQL-databases and relational spatial databases.This talk will present our success in combining geometry and key-value stores in Postgresql by using PostGIS and HStore Ð which lead to a neatly structured geospatial data collection with excellent performance for extractions, both in materialized views, but also running real-time extractions and lightweight analyses used in production decision-making.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geolode: the motherlode of geospatial data sources

You can't make a map without data. A wealth of free and publicly-accessible geospatial data exists on thousands of websites scattered around the world, just waiting to be found and used. But finding the right data for a specific map or analysis requires the knowledge of what geodata websites are out there, and what types of data they each contain. Searching the web can turn up webpages that contain sprawling lists of geodata websites, but such lists are not easily browseable, and are often out of date.Geolode.org is a newly-launched lightweight catalog of geodata websites around the world, searchable and browseable by location, topic, and other tags, so that searchers can quickly focus on the most relevant websites for their geodata needs. An API also provides open access to the catalog's records in JSON format.Geolode's inventory is the collaborative product of a group of librarians and other researchers with many years of experience searching for a wide range of data. We'll talk about how Geolode works, as well as strategies for keeping Geolode up to date, such as harvesting links from all those sprawling lists, and monitoring Twitter for reports of new geodata resources.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Creating Custom HTML Elements for Maps

Maps appear all over the web but the core structural language of the web—HTML—does not natively support them. Adding dynamic or interactive maps to a web page or web application can involve complex JavaScript code that is difficult to reuse between contexts.Web developers are starting to have opportunities to change this. Some newer web development frameworks are designed to support HTML page elements with custom attributes as a way of defining behaviors. These frameworks anticipate web components, an emerging standard for creating fully custom HTML tags. Custom attributes and elements make it possible to effectively expand HTML to include `...`.This talk will demonstrate how to use existing JavaScript map libraries to create flexible, reusable maps that take the form of HTML elements with custom attributes. Looking forward, we'll explore how web components let us take this technique even further and create true custom HTML elements for maps and the display of other geo data.Crafting custom HTML map elements doesn't just mean making maps a first-class citizen of web page markup, it offers a whole new way to create and share web-based mapping tools between applications and organizations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)