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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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projections in web browsers are terrible and you should be ashamed of yourself

The JavaScript port of proj4 was (relatively) recently moved from subversion to github and updated to use modern build tools.The talk will discuss some of the differences between desktop and web environments when it comes to projections and CRS, other new projects that take a different perspective on projections (like topojson), and why you can't just use an EPSG number in your browser (and should be ashamed of yourself wanting to).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An automated classification and change detection system for rapid update of land-cover maps of South Africa using Landsat data.

Recent land cover maps are essential to spatial planning and assessment by non-/governmental agencies. The current land cover mapping methods employed in South Africa are slow and expensive and the most recent national land cover map dates back to 2000. The CSIR is developing an automated land-cover mapping system for the South African region. This system uses widely available Landsat satellite image time series data, together with supervised machine learning, change detection, and image preprocessing techniques. In this presentation the implementation of this end-to-end system will be addressed. Specifically, we will discuss the use of an open source random forest implementation (Weka), a change detection algorithm (IRMAD), as well as tools used for satellite image preprocessing (Web enabled Landsat data, fmask cloud masking) and on-line validation tools. Furthermore the approach used in optimising automatic land-cover production accuracy for operational use will be discussed.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Web Mapping: An educational resource for creating online maps using free and open source software

Free and open source software (FOSS) for GIS continues to increase in functionality and usability, and offers a flexible and economic option for organization that want to create online maps; however, beginners face a broad array of software choices and may not know which FOSS products and packages to deploy in each tier of the web map architecture. Compounding the problem is the fact that much documentation for FOSS GIS is fragmented among these tier-specific products and does not provide end-to-end workflows for designing and publishing cartographic web services and assembling them into an online map product. In response to these needs, The Pennsylvania State University has introduced an open online course entitled Open Web Mapping. The course lessons explain the theory and architecture of web mapping, while walking beginners through the process of deploying online maps with FOSS. Software such as QGIS, GDAL, GeoServer, TileMill, and OpenLayers is introduced as students start from the data processing stage and work their way to the final display of interactive web service layers in a browser-based map. The course is intended as an open resource for the entire FOSS community; therefore, the lesson materials are freely accessible through a Creative Commons license.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer #ProTips

MapServer is a fast, flexible and extremely powerful tool for creating dynamic maps for the Web. Underneath the hood, MapServer offers many powerful and advanced features that many users never dig into, and new features are being added constantly. Come learn about some of the more advanced features of MapServer, from heat maps to 3D WFS services to exporting data to GDAL file formats to very complex symbology and labeling. Learn simple and advanced use cases and debugging techniques for some of these advanced features from two presenters with over 20 years combined experience of using MapServer. A live MapServer instance will be used during this presentation (yes we are crazy!).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Gimme some YeSQL ! - and a GIS -

So long NoSQL, here is YeSQL !Not long ago, PostgreSQL was the the most advanced OpenSource relational database. With the latest version 9.4, it became an over-powerful mutant : the most advanced OpenSource Object-Oriented relational and/or non-relational, Spatial, SQL and/or NoSQL database. For the sake of simplicity, let us call it a YeSQL database.This presentation will introduce you to the feature galore of PostgreSQL, giving insights into the latest improvements from a user point of view. Of course some GIS inclination will drive this talk, and show you how you can take advantage of spatial extensions together with PostgreSQL core features.PostgreSQL 9.4 is an important milestone for various reason : a lot of new outstanding features, and core improvements which prefigure a whole world of new use cases. The main feature from a user perspective, giving PostgreSQL this YeSQL title, is probably the new JSONB storage. A fine marriage between the Hstore extension and JSON support, it literally transforms PostgreSQL into a document database (think MongoDB in PostgreSQL without data losses).We will therefore present great PostgreSQL 9.4 features, and some ways to use them with spatial data, leveraging the latest PostGIS and PointCloud extensions :* Exclusion constraints* KNN search* Lateral joins* Window functions* (writeable) (recursive) CTE* Automatic updateable views* Materialized views* JSON, more JSON, JSON indexing, JSON proceduresÉ* Foreign Data Wrappers* Logical decoding and future applications* More JSON ? GeoJSON ?The feature set available to PostgreSQL users is growing with every release, as are performances. And the spatial part of it is not lagging behind. It is a must-use platform for data management, data infrastructures. And a GIS.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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UrbanSim2: Simulating the Connected Metropolis

<style type="text/css"><!--td br --></style>UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatial simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.<style type="text/css"><!--td br -->UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatialå simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.--></style>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using QGIS server

Kristianstad municipality in Sweden has since 2013 been using QGIS and QGIS Server as a base in our GIS platform. Our goal is to have a user friendly, yet powerful, set of applications from server via desktop and web to mobile applications. All based on open source. QGIS and QGIS server has several functions that makes it easier for both the users and administrators of the systems. That could be saving styles and attrib-ute forms to the database, styling and publish WMS and WFS directly from the desktop QGIS application. With a combination of different types of caching mechanisms we achieve fast and flexible services for our web applications. These open source projects, sMap and sMap-mobile, have also been designed to be fast, flexible and user friendly.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exploring Openness in Geospatial Education

This panel discussion will explore efforts to embed openness into geospatial education, including courses on open geospatial solutions as well as innovative teaching methods that help expand the audience who can engage with open geospatial systems such as MOOCs and open courseware.Panelists include Robert Cheetham (Azavea), Sara Safavi (RackSpace), Nuala Cowan (George Washington University), and Calvin Metcalf (AppGeo).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Client-side versus server-side geoprocessing: Benchmarking the performance of web browsers processing geospatial data using common GIS operations.

Are web browsers ready to handle a larger portion of the processing load in our GIS applications? Web-based GIS and mapping applications are traditionally based on a client-server model, where most of the data processing work is placed on the server. This study examines what happens when that processing load is shifted to the client, using JavaScript to process geospatial data with GIS operations directly in the browser.The time needed to complete common GIS tasks using the JavaScript library JSTS Topology Suite were benchmarked in popular web browsers including Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari. The GIS operations buffer, union, and Voronoi diagram were tested with a suite of points, lines, and polygons ranging in size from 10 up to 100,000 vertices. The testing platforms included Windows, Mac, and Linux desktops and laptops.The same geoprocessing tests were conducted on a cloud-based Linux server using the Java library JTS Topology Suite as a performance comparison of server-side processing applications. The various testing configurations were then analyzed to see how browsers stack up to the performance of traditional client-server applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Leaflet + UtfGrids + d3.js = liquid fast, massively scalable interactive web map & data visualization

I will discuss and demo how I use Leaflet, UtfGrids, and D3.js in concert to view and interact with large geographic data on the web. This presentation will not be on d3.js, but rather how to get geographic data from a map to a d3.js chart. I will illustrate why this stack is liquid fast and massively scalable and discus in some detail what a UtfGrid is, how it works and how to create and server them to the web. The context of my work:I am currently working on an open source project called OpenQuake. As a part of this project we are developing a platform which serves as a hub for integrated risk assessment. It allows users to combine seismic hazard, risk and social vulnerability in many different ways in order to obtain output for science, risk assessment, risk awareness and risk management.All my work is available on Github and links will be provided to all demonstrated material.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Real-time Scenario Planning with OpenLayers

Area-based planning processes are rapidly moving from paper and desktop GIS based processes to online applications offering real-time analysis and feedback. Users want an interactive and informative experience allowing them to generate reports and analysis without needing to understand the subtleties of GIS or spatial analysis. They expect a compelling user experience that works on a variety of platforms Ð ranging from old or outdated browsers to tablets and smart phones.Building from years of experience (and standing on many shoulders), this talk demonstrates some of the strategies and techniques achieved for the Marine Planner platform, an online open-source map viewer and decision support tool. These strategies include UTFGrids, tile caching, pre-processing, and standard and forked OpenLayer libraries, among others. The result is large-scale scenario planning tools with a responsive and compelling user-experience that anyone who has used online maps can figure out.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Building Open Source Projects in Government Esri Ecosystems

The challenges that are most commonly discussed by proponents of open source in government technology relate to changing the culture among technical staff and explaining the value of open tools and systems. But beyond the political concerns and misperceptions, there are practical complications in implementing these tools inside proprietary tech ecosystems like Esri. Although it's becoming easier, injecting open source into the Esri stack can be convoluted, to say the least.For all of its challenges, however, there have been many successful open source implementations in all levels of government, from open data portals to full-scale applications. Using case studies from recent Code for America projects, this talk will identify some of the more difficult challenges and highlight a few techniques for integrating open source geo tools into the Esri stack with a focus on minimizing difficulty for the developer and maximizing benefit for the end user. The talk will focus on web applications and tools while touching on data interoperability, spatial analysis, and trainings/documentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adding value to Open Data using Open Source GIS.

New Zealand, like many other countries around the world, is developing Government policies requiring open access to public data. The National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has been directed to make subtantial parts of its fisheries, climate, coastal, oceanic and freshwater data more publicly available for re-use. NIWA recognises that making such data available is of very limited value, if potential users do not have access to suitable tools to work with these data, ie: GIS applications. As part of its Open Data programme, NIWA's Fisheries and Environmental Centers have funded enhancements to an Open Source GIS application, QGIS, and made this application available as a free download, along with NIWA data. This approach enables the effective re-use of NIWA (and other agencies') environmental and spatial data by individuals and organisations who otherwise have little or no access to commercial GIS tools. This presentation discusses the value of Open Source (and Open Standards) to support Open Data initiatives, and NIWA's experiences along the way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:11 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An Open Source Approach to Communicating Weather Risks

Weather data is a critical element in the decision making process for a vast number of entities and its timely and accurate portrayal is essential. The U.S. National Weather Service has utilized a combination of Open Source projects including: OpenLayers, Qooxdoo, PostGIS and Flot among others to create a mash-up called the Enhanced Data Display or EDD (preview.weather.gov/edd) to promote the development of a Weather Ready Nation. The EDD provides a platform to quickly communicate past, current and future weather conditions. What happens over the next couple of hours to a week dictates the agenda of everything from strategic resource placement to what to wear to work. More often than not, the weather forecast is not binary - there is always some probabilistic component that results from the inherent chaos of a 4-D fluid wrapped around a spinning sphere. Luckily, the EDD makes use of a variety of techniques that leverage Open Source technologies to present forecasts in both deterministic and probabilistic forms. The EDD contains many visual displays that refine bulky meteorological datasets into palatable forms. Whether you are looking to see what hazards you may face along a travel route or trying to find a heat map of how many people will be impacted by a tornado warning, the EDD can display this quickly. Finally, the ability to combine EDD layers with your own data makes this an extremely powerful application. EDD is a good example of how leveraging Open Source resources can result in an exquisite product.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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