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32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Serving high-resolution sptatiotemporal climate data is hard, let's go shopping

The world is a big place and time is infinite. Scientists who study any aspect of the Earth's climate are immediately faced with the exponentially growing amount of data that are required to represent properties of the climate in both time and space. The bulk of these data is a substantial barrier to extracting meaningful information from their contents. This barrier can be prohibitive to smaller-scale researchers and communities that want to study and understand the impact of the climate on their localities. Fortunately, a substantial amount of free and open source software (FOSS) exists upon which one can build a great geospatial data application.The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC), a regional climate services provider in British Columbia, Canada, has been making a concerted effort to use geospatial FOSS in order to expand the availability, comprehensibility and transparency of big climate data sets from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiment. With a full stack of geospatial FOSS and open protocols we have built and deployed a web platform capable of visualizing and distributing high-resolution spatiotemporal raster climate data.Our web application consists of:+ back-end storage with raw NetCDF4/HDF5 files+ a PostgreSQL/PostGIS database for indexed metadata+ ncWMS for maps and visualization+ the PyDAP OPeNDAP server for data requests+ a web user interface to tie it all togetherThis presentation will provide a case study for enabling scientific collaboration using FOSS and open standards. We will describe our application architecture, present praise for and critique of the components we used, and provide a detailed discussion of the components that we had to improve or write ourselves. Finally, though our use case is specific to climate model output, we will provide some commentary as to how this use case relates to other applications of spatiotemporal data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A Mobile Situated Learning Module using Open Source Geoweb Technology

Mobile device technology is being introduced into educational settings and is likely to become widespread as an instructional medium in the coming years. As of 2013, nearly three-fourths of American college students own a smartphone, while four in ten own a tablet, and a majority of students believe that mobile devices can make their education more effective. There is tremendous opportunity to harness these devices for situated learning, or lessons that take place in a real-world context, through the use of mobile-ready geoweb technologies. Adaptive web maps can be developed to guide students to important places—either virtually or physically—and facilitate landmark interpretation. This presentation will demonstrate a situated learning module developed using open source geoweb technologies for an International Studies course at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The purpose of the module is to "make the familiar strange" to students in the Madison landscape, guiding them to historic landmarks and pairing those places with maps, images, and narration to explore the course of economic development in the U.S. The web application makes use of the principles of responsive web design to adapt to mobile or desktop devices, altering the map interface and modes of content delivery to fit the user's context. The mobile and desktop versions will each be evaluated to determine what adaptations effectively increased usability and whether situated viewing of the map on a mobile device influenced learning outcomes. A review of the application development and evaluation processes and results will be accompanied by a summary of lessons learned about how mobile mapping applications can adapt to their users and surroundings.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Web Mapping: An educational resource for creating online maps using free and open source software

Free and open source software (FOSS) for GIS continues to increase in functionality and usability, and offers a flexible and economic option for organization that want to create online maps; however, beginners face a broad array of software choices and may not know which FOSS products and packages to deploy in each tier of the web map architecture. Compounding the problem is the fact that much documentation for FOSS GIS is fragmented among these tier-specific products and does not provide end-to-end workflows for designing and publishing cartographic web services and assembling them into an online map product. In response to these needs, The Pennsylvania State University has introduced an open online course entitled Open Web Mapping. The course lessons explain the theory and architecture of web mapping, while walking beginners through the process of deploying online maps with FOSS. Software such as QGIS, GDAL, GeoServer, TileMill, and OpenLayers is introduced as students start from the data processing stage and work their way to the final display of interactive web service layers in a browser-based map. The course is intended as an open resource for the entire FOSS community; therefore, the lesson materials are freely accessible through a Creative Commons license.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Making Space for Diverse Mappers

<p>Diverse communities provide the space for different points of view to find voice. Historically open source communities have balanced the contribution of various perspectives and expertises. We are often industry examples of remote cultural collaboration. But the nature of collaboration is changing, where diversity must stretch further across geographies to foster a wider scope of difference. One that includes the other sides of privileged space. In this session, I will present on why ideological diversity can be at the forefront of community structures by introducing three personal cornerstones - Mapzen, Maptime, and GeoNYC. This interactive session highlights how embracing a range of cultural perspectives and technical expertise allows communities to create the unexpected. We'll review success and challenges while performing our own mini GeoNYC complete with 3-word introductions and mapping fun. </p>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Fast Big Data?" A High-Performance System for Creating Global Satellite Image Time Series

Description:We describe a system that transforms sequences of MODIS images covering the entire Earth into time-optimized data cubes to provide rapid access to time series data for various applications.Abstract:Satellite time series data are key to global change monitoring related to climate and land cover change. Various research and operational applications such as crop monitoring and fire history analysis rely on rapid access to extended, hyper-temporal time series data. However, converting large volumes of spatial data into time series and storing it efficiently is a challenging task. In order to solve this Big Data problem, CSIR has developed a system which is capable of automated downloading and processing of several terabytes of MODIS data into time-optimized "data cubes." This time series data is instantly accessible via a variety of applications, including a mobile app that analyzes and displays 14 years of vegetation activity and fire time series data for any location in the world. In this presentation we will describe the implementation of this system on a high-performance Storage Area Network (SAN) using open source software including GDAL and HDF5. We discuss how to optimally store time series data within HDF cubes, the hardware requirements of working with data at this scale as well as several challenges encountered. These include writing high-performance processing code, updating data cubes efficiently and working with HDF data in a multi-threaded environment. We conclude by showing visualizations of our vegetation and burned area time series data in QGIS, web apps, and mobile apps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapJakarta - Enabling civic co-management through GeoSocial Intelligence

Mapping urban infrastructure systems is a key requirement to advance our capacity to understand and promote the resilience of cities to both extreme weather events as a result of climate change and to long-term infrastructure transformation as a process of climate adaptation. Yet, while developing nations will bear the brunt of the interwoven, climatic, economic and social challenges of the 21st century, many of these countries lack the sensor networks required to monitor and model the response of the urban system to change. The nexus of people and place embedded in social media communication which is widespread and ubiquitous in many developing nations offers one potential solution. In this context, location-based social media often in the form of big-data, can be used to map emerging spatio-temporal trends to support situational management. Critically, however, the collection and application of such data raises significant questions around privacy, trust and security of the information gathered. The MapJakarta.org project will be presented as a demonstration of the capabilities of free and open source geospatial technology to employ real-time social media data in a secure and anonymous manner for the purpose of decision support.MapJakarta.org is a pioneering web-based platform that harnesses the power of social media by gathering, sorting and displaying information about flooding for Jakarta residents and governmental agencies in real time. The project, in partnership with the Flood Management Office in Jakarta (BPBD DKI) will radically change real-time data collection and feedback for flood monitoring in the most densely populated city in Southeast Asia. The platform runs on the open source software known as CogniCity Ð a GeoSocial Intelligence framework developed by the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong Ð which allows situational information to be collected and disseminated by community members through their location enabled mobile devices via social media networks. Furthermore, the framework also enables governmental actors to perform rapid infrastructure surveys and asset management for pre and post-flood assessment using the same networks. CogniCity is built on the NodeJS platform, and utilizes the PostGIS spatial database for storage, and the LeafletJS map library for visualisation.In this presentation we will explain how these open source components are combined to form a geographical information system within the existing flood management framework, enabling the collection and analysis of social media for flood response and civic co-management in the megacity of Jakarta.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Do This, and also That: Integrating Open Source tools into traditional GIS shops"

This talk is intended for GIS users & managers who may be interested in open source GIS but aren't sure what the advantages to them might be, or who think Open Source GIS is nice in principle but are afraid there's no space for it in their workplace. In general, "Do This, and also That..." wants to address concerns of professionals who aren't sure how or why to make the leap from traditional/proprietary GIS tools into the wide world of Open Source GIS.Drawing from my own experiences, my goal is to gently present an integrated approach to open source GIS. This is not an "all or nothing" scenario: I want to show the audience how effective workflow solutions can involve both open source GIS as well as "traditional" proprietary GIS they are familiar with.I will briefly discuss common issues faced by GIS users, and explore the benefits of integrating open-source based workflows alongside proprietary GIS. I will cover use-cases for Leaflet and OpenLayers, OGR2OGR, PostGIS, and QGIS. Each use-case will demo a quick and friendly example of how a particular real-world issue might be addressed by the inclusion of one of these open source options into an existing GIS stack.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using QGIS server

Kristianstad municipality in Sweden has since 2013 been using QGIS and QGIS Server as a base in our GIS platform. Our goal is to have a user friendly, yet powerful, set of applications from server via desktop and web to mobile applications. All based on open source. QGIS and QGIS server has several functions that makes it easier for both the users and administrators of the systems. That could be saving styles and attrib-ute forms to the database, styling and publish WMS and WFS directly from the desktop QGIS application. With a combination of different types of caching mechanisms we achieve fast and flexible services for our web applications. These open source projects, sMap and sMap-mobile, have also been designed to be fast, flexible and user friendly.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tilez: serving seamless polygons in the browser with TopoJSON and Node.js

This talk will introduce the Tilez project, which provides aNode.js-based realisation of a Tile Map Service tiles in both GeoJSON andTopoJSON formats. This formats provide a seamless and highly performant usermapping experience in both OpenLayers and Leaflet.The key to fast display of vector geometries in Tilezz lies in the use oftiles, which leverage both local and server-side caching. Whilst linear features lend themselves easily to tiling, polygons have traditionally represented more of a challenge.Tilez provides further efficiencies by using TopoJSON as a transport formatbetween the server and the client. Tilez implements all these improvements to support web-based vector tiling, delivering good performance under heavy load through Node,js and CouchDB-based caching, and efficient transport through TopoJSON. This talk will cover Tilez and the practical aspects of its implementation together with use cases from the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN - www.aurin.org.au).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNode for Humanitarian Crisis and Risk Reduction

GeoNode is a web-based application and platform for developing geospatial information systems (GIS) and for deploying spatial data infrastructures (SDI).The World Bank, the European Commission and the UN World Food Programme are among the major contributors and sustainers of the GeoNode project and they are using it for spatial data sharing and management projects.Being extremely active in the field of Humanitarian Crisis and Risk Reduction they have deployed custom GeoNode instances to support risk reduction and post crisis need assessment.During this talk three customized GeoNode instances will be presented, focusing the attention on their technology, usage for emergency preparedness and response, their federation and the added value provided by Open Source technologies for geospatial data sharing.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Managing public data on GitHub: Pay no attention to that git behind the curtain

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) continuously solicits feedback on transportation data from local government partners. Historically, this process has taken the form of lots of markings on plotted maps with immeasurable amounts of manual work on the tail end to organize and interpret this feedback. Many tools developed specifically for this process today often fall short of the needs of agencies (such as geospatial presentation and tracking comments), yet the cost to develop or implement custom software is generally out of reach for government agencies.This presentation introduces a case study of the process to develop geospatial collaboration tools for managing transportation data directly hosted on GitHub pages (currently in development at http://atlregional.github.io/plan-it/ and http://atlregional.github.io/fc-review/). This approach was partially inspired by GitHub's recent features additions that make collaborating on geospatial data simple and elegant. Because these data span both functional and jurisdictional divisions, many of the greatest challenges have been project management related --- coordinating stakeholder feedback and project requirements. However, by utilizing the existing git/GitHub infrastructure, many of these requirements can be managed cost effectively. Moreover, the framework allows for direct integration with other application environments via the GitHub API and GDAL Tools, ensuring that local modifications to project data are committed back to the data repository.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions.Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources.Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields.The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries.The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Repurposing OpenTripPlanner for Ride Sharing

OpenTripPlanner is an open source application for building multi-modal itineraries using OpenStreetMap data about walking and driving routes and General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data for public transit data. With some creative adjustments, OpenTripPlanner can also be used to generate itineraries for ride sharing based on a pool of existing rides.This talk will demonstrate taking advantage of OpenTripPlanner's flexibility in this fashion. The example of repurposing OpenTripPlanner will serve as the basis for a more general discussion of ways that functionality relating to geospatial data can be reused in unanticipated ways.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fiona and Rasterio: Data Access for Python Programmers and Future Python Programmers

Fiona and Rasterio are new GDAL-based Python libraries that embody lessonslearned over a decade of using GDAL and Python to solve geospatial problems.Among these lessons: the importance of productivity, enjoyability, andserendipity to both experts and beginners.I will discuss the motivation for writing Fiona and Rasterio and explain howand why they diverge from other GIS software and embrace Python's native types,protocols, and idioms. I will also explain why they adhere to some GISparadigms and bend or break others. Finally, I will show examples of using Fiona and Rasterio to read, manipulate,and write raster and vector data. Some examples will be familiar to users ofolder Python GIS software and will illustrate how Fiona and Rasterio let youget more done with less code and fewer bugs. I will also demonstrate fun anduseful features not found in other geospatial libraries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoScript - A Geospatial Swiss Army Knife

GeoScript adds spatial capabilities to dynamic scripting languages that run on the JVM. With implementations in Python, JavaScript, Scala, and Groovy, GeoScript provides an interface to the powerful data access, processing and rendering functionality of the GeoTools library.GeoScript provides concise and simple apis that allow developers to perform tasks quickly making it a great tool for the day to day data juggling that comes with geopspatial data. This talk will focus mainly on real world examples that showcase the power of the library.Come check this talk out if you are interested in learning about a new tool to add to your geospatial hacking toolbox. Maybe you have tried to use GeoTools but find it too difficult and complex to use. Or perhaps your java skills are not where you would like them to be. If that is the case this talk, and GeoScript, might be just what you are looking for.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Choose your own Adventure - Open Source Spatial on OpenShift

Learn how to build quick and easy open source mapping solutions using several different languages and datastores. Well start by selecting our source data, and a database to house it. Then, we'll pick language and a simple microframework to power a basic REST API. Finally, we add Leaflet Maps for user-facing data visualization and controls. Feel free to bring a laptop and follow along to launch your very own mapping application during this short talk.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:03 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer Project Update - Introducing Version 7.0

This session will begin with a status update for the MapServer project - current and future directions. Focus will then shift to the main features and enhancements coming in MapServer 7.0 including dynamic heatmaps, WFS 2.0 support, UTFGrid generation and more. Finally we'll finish with a discussion of contribution opportunities for interested developers and users.This a great opportunity to chat with the members of the MapServer project team!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Mapossum: A System for Creating, Collecting and Displaying Spatially-Referenced Answers to User-Contributed Questions

This project, originally inspired by the pop vs soda maps (www.popvssoda.com) seeks to create a web application where any question can be asked and answered by anyone with internet access. The Mapossum allows users to visualize spatial patterns in the questions they wish to pose without the need to possess the knowledge necessary to create maps of their own. The application creates a spatial web-survey system that harnesses the visualization power of a web map to explore the spatial components of question. As a tool it has the ability to help users reveal a different dimension of spatial interactions, and provides more insight into cultural and regional interactions. To accomplish this we have created a framework that abstracts the creation of questions and the logging of spatially referenced responses so that the answers can be mapped as points, or aggregated at various levels of administrative or political units (counties, states, countries). The application utilizes PostGIS/PostgreSQL to store and manipulate the data for the questions, responses, and other spatial data needed to support the application. The information is served as Web Mercator tiles using Python and Mapnik. On the front end these tiles and other data are consumed using the Leaflet JavaScript library. Users have the ability to create questions and the possible responses to these questions, as well as query the responses. The presentation will discuss the framework in detail, and we will demonstrate the use of the application for various types of question Ð response collection scenarios. The application has potential to be used as a general data collection tool for those collecting data in the field. We are also seeking to include the ability to couple the process of both answering and visualizing responses with social networking sites. The Mapossum couples a web-survey system with the visualization power of a web map to explore questions that have a spatial component to them as so many questions do.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The unrelenting progress of design in open source

Open source geospatial is in an Enlightenment era regarding design; many teams are breaking away from tradition and embracing simple, clean, and usable interfaces. For a long time though, open source geospatial software, and geospatial software in general, seemed to pay little attention to the knowledge of the design community. Here, I will discuss why design has taken a backseat for such a long history and what is suddenly changing that brings it to the forefront. I will also talk some about the design decisions that have gone into the CartoDB user interface and many of the mapping options we help our users find. This talk will focus both on the history of design in open source geospatial software and where it is heading in the future. We will also talk about how design itself is inherently open and how we are working to improve open source software design through our own contributions and through this discussion of our process.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
33:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping Words and Phrases from Geographic Knowledge on the Web

Extremely rich and diverse knowledge about places across the world is available online in a variety of forms, including structured data, image, and natural language description. Map-based exploration of this knowledge has potential to aid a number of applications from education to marketing. In this presentation we describe a system to map geographic regions associated with arbitrary keywords, phrases, and texts by computing topic surfaces over the Earth from unstructured natural language text. Our methodology combines natural language processing and geostatistics and is built using freely available open source tools. We train our system on Wikipedia and travel blog entries and demonstrate it with a general-purpose geographic knowledge exploration tool.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Update on new OGC Standards: GeoPackage, OWS Context & Geosync

This presentation presents an overview on new OGC standards and developer tips on how to build your own implementations from scratch or on top of existing open source libraries that implement them. We cover GeoPackage, the new SQLite-based geospatial data format; OWS Context for describing a group of related spatial data resources (e.g. for map composition); and the emerging Geosync architecture based on lessons from CouchDB.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)