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28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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projections in web browsers are terrible and you should be ashamed of yourself

The JavaScript port of proj4 was (relatively) recently moved from subversion to github and updated to use modern build tools.The talk will discuss some of the differences between desktop and web environments when it comes to projections and CRS, other new projects that take a different perspective on projections (like topojson), and why you can't just use an EPSG number in your browser (and should be ashamed of yourself wanting to).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Advanced CartoCSS Techniques

CartoCSS is becoming an ever more popular Ð and ever more powerful Ð tool for cartographic and data styling. In this talk, Stamen designers and technologists will present some tips and tricks to make your next design sing. Tips and tricks covered include, but will not be limited to: pixelation, use of dingbat fonts for texture and markers, post-facto label adjustment, alternate uses for text symbolization, where to find and use entropy, blending, and geometry manipulation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An automated classification and change detection system for rapid update of land-cover maps of South Africa using Landsat data.

Recent land cover maps are essential to spatial planning and assessment by non-/governmental agencies. The current land cover mapping methods employed in South Africa are slow and expensive and the most recent national land cover map dates back to 2000. The CSIR is developing an automated land-cover mapping system for the South African region. This system uses widely available Landsat satellite image time series data, together with supervised machine learning, change detection, and image preprocessing techniques. In this presentation the implementation of this end-to-end system will be addressed. Specifically, we will discuss the use of an open source random forest implementation (Weka), a change detection algorithm (IRMAD), as well as tools used for satellite image preprocessing (Web enabled Landsat data, fmask cloud masking) and on-line validation tools. Furthermore the approach used in optimising automatic land-cover production accuracy for operational use will be discussed.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A User-centered Design for Interactive Masking Capability within Web GIS

This presentation will discuss the design of interactive raster masking capability for a web-based geographic information system (Web GIS) from the perspective of user-centered design. A case study will be presented by analyzing and discussing specific aspects of the user-developer dialog within the context of the software development life cycle. The presented case study will take the audience through the development of an open-source Web GIS software architecture (MapServer, PostGIS and OpenLayers) with particular focus on how the masking functionality was designed and implemented. Software engineering techniques informed by iterative cognitive walkthrough allowed for a dialog between Web GIS production and consumption that led to a more usable and useful cartographic interface. Key findings from this case study will be presented.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoMOOSE at 10 Years

GeoMOOSE released its very first version in 2005. At nearly 10 years old the project has continued to hold on to its original developers and many of its foundation users. Over that lifespan the project has allowed the development team to observe struggles in changing technology, attitudes, and the dedication required to keep such an open source project relevant as it ages.Nearly 10 years worth of dirty laundry will be aired! And a preview of GeoMOOSE 3.0 ideas! And slides with exclamation points!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Making Space for Diverse Mappers

<p>Diverse communities provide the space for different points of view to find voice. Historically open source communities have balanced the contribution of various perspectives and expertises. We are often industry examples of remote cultural collaboration. But the nature of collaboration is changing, where diversity must stretch further across geographies to foster a wider scope of difference. One that includes the other sides of privileged space. In this session, I will present on why ideological diversity can be at the forefront of community structures by introducing three personal cornerstones - Mapzen, Maptime, and GeoNYC. This interactive session highlights how embracing a range of cultural perspectives and technical expertise allows communities to create the unexpected. We'll review success and challenges while performing our own mini GeoNYC complete with 3-word introductions and mapping fun. </p>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How Simplicity Will Save GIS

It's 2014 — we have consumer robots and electric cars, private spacecraft, planet colonization projects, and the Higgs Boson is confirmed, but GIS software is still a mess. You might be able to make sense of it all if you're a GIS specialist with an academic background, but other creative individuals — designers, developers, tinkerers of all kinds, each with a vision and desire to create meaningful and beautiful maps and visualizations — are constantly losing battles against bloat, clutter, and complexity.How do we reverse this GIS entropy? What does it take to turn complex technology into something that anyone can use and contribute to? An attempt to answer by the creator of Leaflet, a simple JS library that changed the world of online maps forever. 
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Manager's Guide to PostGIS

Your staff keep talking about this "PostGIS" thing, but what is it? Does anyone (important) else use it? What for?This talk gives a brief overview of the place of PostGIS in spatial IT architecture, how PostGIS compares to proprietary alternatives, who is using PostGIS, and how organizations transition to open source databases.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Do This, and also That: Integrating Open Source tools into traditional GIS shops"

This talk is intended for GIS users & managers who may be interested in open source GIS but aren't sure what the advantages to them might be, or who think Open Source GIS is nice in principle but are afraid there's no space for it in their workplace. In general, "Do This, and also That..." wants to address concerns of professionals who aren't sure how or why to make the leap from traditional/proprietary GIS tools into the wide world of Open Source GIS.Drawing from my own experiences, my goal is to gently present an integrated approach to open source GIS. This is not an "all or nothing" scenario: I want to show the audience how effective workflow solutions can involve both open source GIS as well as "traditional" proprietary GIS they are familiar with.I will briefly discuss common issues faced by GIS users, and explore the benefits of integrating open-source based workflows alongside proprietary GIS. I will cover use-cases for Leaflet and OpenLayers, OGR2OGR, PostGIS, and QGIS. Each use-case will demo a quick and friendly example of how a particular real-world issue might be addressed by the inclusion of one of these open source options into an existing GIS stack.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exploring Openness in Geospatial Education

This panel discussion will explore efforts to embed openness into geospatial education, including courses on open geospatial solutions as well as innovative teaching methods that help expand the audience who can engage with open geospatial systems such as MOOCs and open courseware.Panelists include Robert Cheetham (Azavea), Sara Safavi (RackSpace), Nuala Cowan (George Washington University), and Calvin Metcalf (AppGeo).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Scaling for NYC while Tracking Plows

In the winter of 2012, NYC's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) was tasked with developing an application to track snow vehicle operations. The DoITT GIS team was given a mandate to have the application in production before the end of the winter. Due to the aggressive schedule, our approach was to get something up as quickly as possible while enhancing and improving over time. Beyond the schedule constraint, additional challenges were minimal requirements and decision-making by committee with no clear business owner.Three major tasks were required to complete the project: scale the existing infrastructure to better handle the expected demand, determine an approach for communicating the information to the public in a legible and understandable way, and develop and test the application. The team quickly undertook a multi-pronged approach to complete these tasks within a roughly two-month timeframe.Of all the impossible tasks, scaling the infrastructure was the most challenging and difficult. High-profile application launches in NYC that come with press announcements tend to garner traditional and social media coverage and with that national exposure and demand. And although the application would have been a perfect candidate to deploy in the cloud, that was not an option. Additional servers were added and the application was optimized and tuned for performance. To do so, multiple-layers of caching were employed including GeoWebCache and a Content Delivery Network. In terms of visualizing the data, we conducted a quick review of existing public-facing applications. There were not many examples at the time with most cities choosing to show 'breadcrumbs' of a plow's path. We felt this method was not an effective way of conveying plow coverage; our objective being, to show which streets had been plowed and not to show where a plow had been at specific time. As such, we decided on visualizing the data by the time a street was last plowed. Five time-buckets were established and the street segments were color-coded based on the last GPS ping received on the segment. Every 15 minutes an ETL pulls the GPS data and renders tiles using GeoServer and GeoWebCache.The application, PlowNYC, was developed using open source and commercial software and custom code. These include OpenLayers, Geoserver, GeoWebCache, GeoTools and Oracle. Since its release, the application has been enhanced to handle greater traffic, support mobile clients and to simplify the interface. The presentation will cover these aspects of the project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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CS-Map - coordinate system libraries

CS-Map is often used as a reference but has not been as widely adopted as proj4. This presentation describes how CS-Map has been used in a distributed geospatial database for big data.The presentation describes the benefits of CS-Map, in particular its whole earth support and also it disadvantages, primarily it is process locked.The aim of the presentation is to demonstrate that having more than one coordinate system library is a good thing and to encourage development of coordinate system libraries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Real-time Scenario Planning with OpenLayers

Area-based planning processes are rapidly moving from paper and desktop GIS based processes to online applications offering real-time analysis and feedback. Users want an interactive and informative experience allowing them to generate reports and analysis without needing to understand the subtleties of GIS or spatial analysis. They expect a compelling user experience that works on a variety of platforms Ð ranging from old or outdated browsers to tablets and smart phones.Building from years of experience (and standing on many shoulders), this talk demonstrates some of the strategies and techniques achieved for the Marine Planner platform, an online open-source map viewer and decision support tool. These strategies include UTFGrids, tile caching, pre-processing, and standard and forked OpenLayer libraries, among others. The result is large-scale scenario planning tools with a responsive and compelling user-experience that anyone who has used online maps can figure out.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adding value to Open Data using Open Source GIS.

New Zealand, like many other countries around the world, is developing Government policies requiring open access to public data. The National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has been directed to make subtantial parts of its fisheries, climate, coastal, oceanic and freshwater data more publicly available for re-use. NIWA recognises that making such data available is of very limited value, if potential users do not have access to suitable tools to work with these data, ie: GIS applications. As part of its Open Data programme, NIWA's Fisheries and Environmental Centers have funded enhancements to an Open Source GIS application, QGIS, and made this application available as a free download, along with NIWA data. This approach enables the effective re-use of NIWA (and other agencies') environmental and spatial data by individuals and organisations who otherwise have little or no access to commercial GIS tools. This presentation discusses the value of Open Source (and Open Standards) to support Open Data initiatives, and NIWA's experiences along the way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS in Node.js

An overview or GIS tools in server side JavaScript covering turf, proj4js, topojson, mbtiles and integration with Node.js idea like streams.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Developing Tools for Humanitarian Decision Making

The American Red Cross International Services Department (ISD) and project partners are developing a web visualization tool (Mapfolio) to help to visualize Red Cross's disaster response and humanitarian projects around the world. The solution uses innovative Node.js ETL processing to process information from the Red Cross Salesforce Information Management platform. The Mapfolio is open source built on Node.js, Angular, Leaflet, PostGIS, and a custom PGRestAPI (Chubbs). Other technical advances include a custom Leaflet clipped-polygon labeling as well as a map-view-dependent (not zoom level dependent) display of global administrative boundaries. This session will not only walk through the open source components but will also focus on how the Red Cross defined clear deliverables and scaled-up its support of free and open source software.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adopting OGC Standards in a Flood Alert System

This presentation is about the adoption of the OGC - Open Geospatial Consortium standards in Sao Paulo Flood Alert System which was based on matrix coordinates and static maps.The Flood Alert System has more than 300 telemetric stations composed by rain gauges, water level sensors placed on rivers and reservoirs, water quality sensors, weather stations and a S-band weather radar reaching 240 kilometers of scanning range. The system offers Real Time support for a large metropolitan area and its Emergency Centers, Civil Defense groups, Government, Service companies and general public.We have integrated Geotools (for data conversion), Geoserver (services like WMS, WFS), DB2, OpenStreetMap, uDig, Quantum GIS and some other softwares in our architecture. This set of tools provides many possibilities to easily integrate our data with other systems and external data, like some Hydraulic and Hydrological models that return geospacial data with flooding area forecast and vulnerable buildings.Talking about the architecture, the adoption process, some of the issues, apllied solutions and further development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Crazy data: Using PostGIS to fix errors and handle difficult datasets

Inteligeo is a system that stores a lot of information used by the Brazilian Federal Police Forensics to fight crime, initially in the environmental arena with a later expansion to other types of crime. During the construction of the database a lot of problems appeared for which PostGIS was the key to the solution.This presentation describes problems encountered by the team while loading 850+ shapefiles into the database, linking with external databases and building 950+ views of the data.Although the content of the recipes is very technical, the general concepts will be explained in an accessible language and correlated to real world cases.Topics:*Definition of crazy data in our context*Quick recipes- Spike removal- Invalid geometry detection and fixing- Filling holes- Raster image footprints- Hammering data into correct topologies- Speeding data visualization with ST Simplify and PGSQL 9.3's materialized views- Rough georeferencing using an auxiliary table- Creating constraints*How is crazy data generated and our experience in handling each case- Large datasets- Lack of validation- Reprojection- Geometric operations- Topological errors- Imprecise definitions- Legacy databases- Bad georeferencingWe will also discuss why is handling crazy data important for the Brazilian Federal Police, our efforts in cleaning up data at the source and the implications of geographical data in general for fighting crime.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geolode: the motherlode of geospatial data sources

You can't make a map without data. A wealth of free and publicly-accessible geospatial data exists on thousands of websites scattered around the world, just waiting to be found and used. But finding the right data for a specific map or analysis requires the knowledge of what geodata websites are out there, and what types of data they each contain. Searching the web can turn up webpages that contain sprawling lists of geodata websites, but such lists are not easily browseable, and are often out of date.Geolode.org is a newly-launched lightweight catalog of geodata websites around the world, searchable and browseable by location, topic, and other tags, so that searchers can quickly focus on the most relevant websites for their geodata needs. An API also provides open access to the catalog's records in JSON format.Geolode's inventory is the collaborative product of a group of librarians and other researchers with many years of experience searching for a wide range of data. We'll talk about how Geolode works, as well as strategies for keeping Geolode up to date, such as harvesting links from all those sprawling lists, and monitoring Twitter for reports of new geodata resources.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoExt2 Ð Past, Present and Future

GeoExt is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha.Version 2 of GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/, released in October 2013) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and is built atop the newest official installments of its base libraries; OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 4.2.1.The talk of two GeoExt core developers and members of the PSC (Project Steering Committee) will shortly present the history of the project with a focus on how an international code sprint back in May 2012 lay the foundations of the 2.x-series of GeoExt. The current version will be presented and and we'll discuss new features and important changes for users of the framework. Especially the following aspects will be portrayed:- Usage of the new classes- Compatibility with the single-file build tool of Sencha- Integration into the ExtJS MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture- Better API-documentation- Easier theming of ExtJS/GeoExt applicationsAs both of the base libraries are about to release new major versions Ð OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 5 are very near to be being released in stable versions Ð the last focus of the talk will be the future development of the GeoExt 2 framework.The project has already pre-evaluated the possibility of supporting more than just one mapping library, so a future version of GeoExt might bring support for OpenLayers 3 and/or Leaflet and is likely being built on top of ExtJS 5.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The unrelenting progress of design in open source

Open source geospatial is in an Enlightenment era regarding design; many teams are breaking away from tradition and embracing simple, clean, and usable interfaces. For a long time though, open source geospatial software, and geospatial software in general, seemed to pay little attention to the knowledge of the design community. Here, I will discuss why design has taken a backseat for such a long history and what is suddenly changing that brings it to the forefront. I will also talk some about the design decisions that have gone into the CartoDB user interface and many of the mapping options we help our users find. This talk will focus both on the history of design in open source geospatial software and where it is heading in the future. We will also talk about how design itself is inherently open and how we are working to improve open source software design through our own contributions and through this discussion of our process.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tuning Open Source GIS Tools to Support Weather Data / Rapidly Changing Rasters

The National Weather Service is developing several geospatial forecast visualization and analysis tools. The back end data store and WMS server is built on Open Source GIS tools: GDAL, PostGIS / Raster, Mapserver, and Mapcache.Weather forecasts are in a constant state of flux. In the case of the National Digital Forecast Database, forecasts expire or are superseded every hour. This presents several challenges when it comes to managing forecast rasters with GIS tools, and delivering the most up-to-date, real-time forecasts with an acceptable level of performance. This presentation will examine the methods and practices we've used to optimize our data store performance, from data ingest to forecast analysis to image delivery.* Using PostgreSQL Inheritance / Parent and Child tables to manage raster updates inside the database* Managing an up-to-date image cache in Mapcache and Memcached, with rapidly changing source data.* Optimizing PostGIS raster tiles and Mapserver DATA queries for faster image generation and display over Google Maps* Future work: Expanding PostgreSQL Inheritance to work with raster overviews
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Köppen-Geiger classifications of paleoclimate model simulations

A pyGRASS implementation of the Kšppen-Geiger climate classification applied to paleoclimate model simulations from the Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project III (PMIP III) will be presented. The talk will show the details of how Kšppen-Geiger classifications are practically implemented and applied to climate model simulations using GRASS GIS, the python library pyGRASS and QGIS for the cartography.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:55 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fixing GIS Data Discovery

Discovery of GIS data is broken. It is overly complicated and incomplete. Organizations spend time and money on creation and acquisition of data, yet it sits on hard drives, dvd's, and shelves without a straightforward way for others to discover it. Discovery tools that do exist have usability issues which alienate users and prevent wide adoption. Too often, data discovery is an afterthought, grafted onto tools that have been designed for analysis, or treated as one feature among many in a map portal. Thus these tools attempt to serve every possible user need and in the process become unusable. Simply put, we need an application which enables discovery of GIS data with an emphasis on user experience, integrates seamlessly with other tools, and streamlines the use and organization of geospatial data.We present GeoBlacklight, a collaboratively designed and developed open source software focused on discovery use cases. The project builds on existing, widely adopted open source projects. GeoBlacklight fills the gap in discovery tools for geospatial data by providing a simple, yet powerful intuitive interface. To reach this goal, Stanford University embarked upon a comprehensive design process. Our process includes an environmental scan, stakeholder interviews, user interviews, inter-institutional collaboration, and rapid prototyping. We will present the user personas that have been distilled from our interviews, the user stories and feature prioritization process these inform, and prototypes of the software we have developed so far, as well as plans for future development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)