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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Community Health Mapping

This talk will cover a FOSS4G case study in which a workflow was implemented in several minority public health organizations in 2013. The three organizations were: 1) the Urban Indian Health Institute (Seattle, WA), 2) Papa Ola Lokahi (Honolulu, HI) and 3) The Nature Conservancy of Hawaii (Honolulu, HI). The end users were not GIS professionals but public health staff. Such community based public health organizations do not typically have dedicated GIS staff or budgets for GIS. However, they have each identified mapping needs. The overarching goals of the project were to demonstrate that FOSS4G tools could be effective in minority public health applications, and that they could be used by non-GIS public health staff. Therefore, a focus was placed on identifying the most intuitive and low cost solution meeting their needs.The workflow started with field data collection and included spatial analysis and online data presentation. Field data collection was performed using smart phones and tablets that the end users already owned. Analysis was done via QGIS and final data presentation was done via GIS Cloud. Training sessions were conducted and support was provided throughout the year. However, each organization was able to use the tools with very little follow up support. Each project produced good results, and each is planning on continuing with additional projects in 2014. The workflow will be introduced and results of the three case studies shared.This work was funded by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services via their Outreach and Special Populations Branch.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A User-centered Design for Interactive Masking Capability within Web GIS

This presentation will discuss the design of interactive raster masking capability for a web-based geographic information system (Web GIS) from the perspective of user-centered design. A case study will be presented by analyzing and discussing specific aspects of the user-developer dialog within the context of the software development life cycle. The presented case study will take the audience through the development of an open-source Web GIS software architecture (MapServer, PostGIS and OpenLayers) with particular focus on how the masking functionality was designed and implemented. Software engineering techniques informed by iterative cognitive walkthrough allowed for a dialog between Web GIS production and consumption that led to a more usable and useful cartographic interface. Key findings from this case study will be presented.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer #ProTips

MapServer is a fast, flexible and extremely powerful tool for creating dynamic maps for the Web. Underneath the hood, MapServer offers many powerful and advanced features that many users never dig into, and new features are being added constantly. Come learn about some of the more advanced features of MapServer, from heat maps to 3D WFS services to exporting data to GDAL file formats to very complex symbology and labeling. Learn simple and advanced use cases and debugging techniques for some of these advanced features from two presenters with over 20 years combined experience of using MapServer. A live MapServer instance will be used during this presentation (yes we are crazy!).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Making Space for Diverse Mappers

<p>Diverse communities provide the space for different points of view to find voice. Historically open source communities have balanced the contribution of various perspectives and expertises. We are often industry examples of remote cultural collaboration. But the nature of collaboration is changing, where diversity must stretch further across geographies to foster a wider scope of difference. One that includes the other sides of privileged space. In this session, I will present on why ideological diversity can be at the forefront of community structures by introducing three personal cornerstones - Mapzen, Maptime, and GeoNYC. This interactive session highlights how embracing a range of cultural perspectives and technical expertise allows communities to create the unexpected. We'll review success and challenges while performing our own mini GeoNYC complete with 3-word introductions and mapping fun. </p>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How Simplicity Will Save GIS

It's 2014 — we have consumer robots and electric cars, private spacecraft, planet colonization projects, and the Higgs Boson is confirmed, but GIS software is still a mess. You might be able to make sense of it all if you're a GIS specialist with an academic background, but other creative individuals — designers, developers, tinkerers of all kinds, each with a vision and desire to create meaningful and beautiful maps and visualizations — are constantly losing battles against bloat, clutter, and complexity.How do we reverse this GIS entropy? What does it take to turn complex technology into something that anyone can use and contribute to? An attempt to answer by the creator of Leaflet, a simple JS library that changed the world of online maps forever. 
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Implementing change in OpenStreetMap

In 2013, I was involved in two substantial technical changes to OpenStreetMap: a new default editor and a redesign of the website. Because OpenStreetMap is a collaborative project, these were as much social as technical efforts. This talk will explore the social dynamics of collaborative open source projects and the techniques that helped us successfully implement technical change in a social environment that by nature tends to be change averse.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using QGIS server

Kristianstad municipality in Sweden has since 2013 been using QGIS and QGIS Server as a base in our GIS platform. Our goal is to have a user friendly, yet powerful, set of applications from server via desktop and web to mobile applications. All based on open source. QGIS and QGIS server has several functions that makes it easier for both the users and administrators of the systems. That could be saving styles and attrib-ute forms to the database, styling and publish WMS and WFS directly from the desktop QGIS application. With a combination of different types of caching mechanisms we achieve fast and flexible services for our web applications. These open source projects, sMap and sMap-mobile, have also been designed to be fast, flexible and user friendly.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tilez: serving seamless polygons in the browser with TopoJSON and Node.js

This talk will introduce the Tilez project, which provides aNode.js-based realisation of a Tile Map Service tiles in both GeoJSON andTopoJSON formats. This formats provide a seamless and highly performant usermapping experience in both OpenLayers and Leaflet.The key to fast display of vector geometries in Tilezz lies in the use oftiles, which leverage both local and server-side caching. Whilst linear features lend themselves easily to tiling, polygons have traditionally represented more of a challenge.Tilez provides further efficiencies by using TopoJSON as a transport formatbetween the server and the client. Tilez implements all these improvements to support web-based vector tiling, delivering good performance under heavy load through Node,js and CouchDB-based caching, and efficient transport through TopoJSON. This talk will cover Tilez and the practical aspects of its implementation together with use cases from the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN - www.aurin.org.au).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenLayers 3: a unique mapping library

We've rewritten OpenLayers from the ground up with the goal of offering a powerful, high-performance library leveraging the latest in web technologies. This talk will present the latest advances of the library, focusing on aspects that make OpenLayers 3 stand out. OpenLayers 3, for example, uses technologies, techniques and algorithms that enable high-quality and high-performance vector rendering. Come learn about the optimizations and techniques OpenLayers 3 uses internally, and how you can leverage them in your next web-mapping applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Scaling for NYC while Tracking Plows

In the winter of 2012, NYC's Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) was tasked with developing an application to track snow vehicle operations. The DoITT GIS team was given a mandate to have the application in production before the end of the winter. Due to the aggressive schedule, our approach was to get something up as quickly as possible while enhancing and improving over time. Beyond the schedule constraint, additional challenges were minimal requirements and decision-making by committee with no clear business owner.Three major tasks were required to complete the project: scale the existing infrastructure to better handle the expected demand, determine an approach for communicating the information to the public in a legible and understandable way, and develop and test the application. The team quickly undertook a multi-pronged approach to complete these tasks within a roughly two-month timeframe.Of all the impossible tasks, scaling the infrastructure was the most challenging and difficult. High-profile application launches in NYC that come with press announcements tend to garner traditional and social media coverage and with that national exposure and demand. And although the application would have been a perfect candidate to deploy in the cloud, that was not an option. Additional servers were added and the application was optimized and tuned for performance. To do so, multiple-layers of caching were employed including GeoWebCache and a Content Delivery Network. In terms of visualizing the data, we conducted a quick review of existing public-facing applications. There were not many examples at the time with most cities choosing to show 'breadcrumbs' of a plow's path. We felt this method was not an effective way of conveying plow coverage; our objective being, to show which streets had been plowed and not to show where a plow had been at specific time. As such, we decided on visualizing the data by the time a street was last plowed. Five time-buckets were established and the street segments were color-coded based on the last GPS ping received on the segment. Every 15 minutes an ETL pulls the GPS data and renders tiles using GeoServer and GeoWebCache.The application, PlowNYC, was developed using open source and commercial software and custom code. These include OpenLayers, Geoserver, GeoWebCache, GeoTools and Oracle. Since its release, the application has been enhanced to handle greater traffic, support mobile clients and to simplify the interface. The presentation will cover these aspects of the project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Vector tiles for fast custom maps

Vector tiles are becoming a common solution for fast clientside rendering of spatial data in both browsers and mobile devices. With the recent release of TileMill 2 Mapbox has made it easier to design and render vector tiles. This talk will cover the open source technology under the hood in TileMill 2 as well as other available tools. Also discussed will be the status of an emerging specification for vector tiles and recent advances in the format.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Getting Started with OpenLayers 3

OpenLayers 3 is here! Now it's time to dive in and get mapping. Join us for an overview of OL3 from a user's perspective. We'll cover common use cases and cool features of the library you might not have heard about. Our goal in this presentation is to get you comfortable with the OpenLayers 3 style of mapping - providing an introduction to raster and vector basics, discussing tips for integration with other JavaScript libraries, and exposing you to the build tools so you can choose just the functionality you need for your mapping application.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Supporting Open Data with Open Source

Within the US Federal Government, there is a trend towards embracing the benefits of open data to increase transparency and maximize potential innovation and resulting economic benefit from taxpayer investment. Recently, an Executive Order was signed specifically requiring federal agencies to provide a public inventory of their non-restricted data and to use standard web-friendly formats and services for public data access. For geospatial data, popular free and open source software packages are ideal options to implement an open data infrastructure. NOAA, an agency whose mission has long embraced and indeed centered on open data, has recently deployed or tested several FOSS products to meet the open data executive order. Among these are GeoServer, GeoNode, and CKAN, or Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network, a data management and publishing system.This talk will focus on how these three FOSS products can be deployed together to provide an open data architecture exclusively built on open source. Data sets hosted in GeoServer can be cataloged and visualized in GeoNode, and fed to CKAN for search and discovery as well as translation to open data policy-compliant JSON format. Upcoming enhancements to GeoNode, the middle tier of the stack, will allow integration with data hosting backends other than GeoServer, such as Esri's ArcGIS REST services or external WMS services. We'll highlight NOAA's existing implementation of the above, including the recently-deployed public data catalog, https://data.noaa.gov/, and GeoServer data hosting platform, as well as potential build out of the full stack including the GeoNode integration layer.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Managing public data on GitHub: Pay no attention to that git behind the curtain

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) continuously solicits feedback on transportation data from local government partners. Historically, this process has taken the form of lots of markings on plotted maps with immeasurable amounts of manual work on the tail end to organize and interpret this feedback. Many tools developed specifically for this process today often fall short of the needs of agencies (such as geospatial presentation and tracking comments), yet the cost to develop or implement custom software is generally out of reach for government agencies.This presentation introduces a case study of the process to develop geospatial collaboration tools for managing transportation data directly hosted on GitHub pages (currently in development at http://atlregional.github.io/plan-it/ and http://atlregional.github.io/fc-review/). This approach was partially inspired by GitHub's recent features additions that make collaborating on geospatial data simple and elegant. Because these data span both functional and jurisdictional divisions, many of the greatest challenges have been project management related --- coordinating stakeholder feedback and project requirements. However, by utilizing the existing git/GitHub infrastructure, many of these requirements can be managed cost effectively. Moreover, the framework allows for direct integration with other application environments via the GitHub API and GDAL Tools, ensuring that local modifications to project data are committed back to the data repository.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Trusting the Crowd in a Geospatial Crowdsourcing Application

Crowdsourcing is known as a way to gather information and data from the general public. In last few years crowdsourcing has become the cheapest and one of the most efficient ways to gather data. With the increased availability of smartphones and smart devices, the general public carries a communication device with increasing computational resources, which can also carry a lot of information. With Web 2.0 the access to internet has become simpler and easier.The crowdsourcing application, we have developed is a rating system that incorporates trust into the application. It works by gathering data of the busyness of hangout places from the crowd, specified in terms of a rating of the busyness of the establishment. The data gathered is shown back to the public using modified ratings and the trustworthiness of those ratings. Ratings are shown in real-time and on a map. The end-user platform for which the application is built includes Android and the web.HTML5 and PHP have been used for designing the main web page which works on any end user platform. JavaScript is used to display base maps from OpenStreetMap and Google servers.PHPMyAdmin is used to manage the MySQL Database. Java was used to program the front end of the application.The dots on the map range from small to large, with a small icon indicating a quiet place and the largest icon indicating a busy place. The trust rating shows our confidence in the rating of busyness, using an algorithm that produces a result ranging from 0% to 100%.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions.Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources.Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields.The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries.The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Advanced Security With GeoServer

The presentation will provide an introduction to GeoServer own authentication and authorization subsystems. We'll cover the supported authentication protocols, such as from basic/digest authentication and CAS support, check through the various identity providers, such as local config files, database tables and LDAP servers, and how it's possible to combine the various bits in a single comprehensive authentication tool, as well as providing examples of custom authentication plugins for GeoServer, integrating it in a home grown security architecture.We'll then move on to authorization, describing the GeoServer pluggable authorization mechanism and comparing it with proxy based solution, and check the built in service and data security system, reviewing its benefits and limitations.Finally we'll explore an advanced authentication tool called GeoFence, and see how it can plug into GeoServer to provide graphical configuration abilities for use complex authorization rules over data and OGC services, taking into account spatial filters, attribute filters, attribute hiding as well as cropping raster data to areas of interest. Finally we'll show how using LDAP both GeoFence and GeoServer can use a common users database, simplifying administrators job, and provide some real world examples.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Extracting geographic data from Wikipedia

A large fraction of Wikipedia's millions of articles include geographic references. This makes Wikipedia a potentially rich source for themed, curated geographic datasets. But the free form nature of Wikipedia's markup language presents some technical challenges. I'll walk through the Wikipedia API, show how to get to the various places where spatial info might be found, and show some blind alleys I've followed. Examples are from a project that uses Wikipedia to enhance a map-based iOS app of some US National Park Service data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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24-hr Latency End to End Data Processing Using Open Source Technologies for the Airborne Snow Observatory

JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory is an integrated imaging spectrometer and scanning LIDAR for measuring mountain snow albedo, snow depth/snow water equivalent, and ice height (once exposed), led by PI Dr. Tom Painter. The team recently wrapped our second "Snow On" campaign where over a course of 3 months, we flew the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir; focusing initial on the Tuolumne, and then moving to weekly flights over the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado.To meet the needs of its customers including Water Resource managers who are keenly interested in Snow melt, the ASO team had to develop and end to end 24 hour latency capability for processing spectrometer and LIDAR data from Level 0 to Level 4 products. Fondly referring to these processing campaigns as "rodeos" the team rapidly constructed a Big Data open source data processing system at minimal cost and risk that not only met our processing demands, but taught the entire team many lessons about remote sensing of snow and dust properties, algorithm integration, the relationship between computer scientists, and snow hydrologist; flight and engineering teams, geographers, and most importantly lessons about camaraderie that will engender highly innovative and rapid data systems development, and quality science products for years to come.Chris Mattmann, Paul Ramirez, and Cameron Goodale for the ASO project will present this talk and will detail the story of the Compute processing capability on behalf of the larger team, highlighting contributions of its key members along the way. We will cover the blending of open source technologies and proprietary software packages that have helped us attain our goals and discuss areas that we are actively investigating to expand our use of open source.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapCache: Overview of MapServer's tile caching server

MapCache is the MapServer project's implementation of a tile caching server. It aims to be simple to install and configure, to be (very) fast (written in C and running as a native module under apache or nginx, or as a standalone fastcgi instance), and to be capable (services WMTS, googlemaps, virtualearth, KML, TMS, WMS). When acting as a WMS server, it will also respond to untiled GetMap requests, by dynamically merging multiple layers into a single image, and multiple tiles into an arbitrary image size. Multiple cache backends are included, allowing tiles to be stored and retrieved from file based databases (sqlite, mbtiles, berkeley-db), memcached instances, cloud REST containers (S3, Azure, Google Cloud Storage), or even directly from tiled TIFF files. Support of dimensions allows storing multiple versions of a tileset (e.g. one per customer), and time based requests can be dynamically served by interpreting and reassembling entries matching the requested time interval. MapCache can also be used to transparently speedup existing WMS instances, by intercepting getmap requests that can be served by tiles, and proxying all other requests to the original WMS server. Along with an overview of MapCache's functionalities, this presentation will also address real-world usecases and recommended configurations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)