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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geodesign: An Introduction to Design with Geography

Geodesign, at its most basic, is design with geography. It is the combination of the tools and techniques geographers and other geoscientists use to understand our world with the methods and workflows designers use to propose solutions and interventions. For instance, the typical master planning process in which GIS-based knowledge is separated from the design process can be turned into a geodesign task by sketching buildings and other land uses directly within a GIS, and seeing indicators update on the fly as various data graphics. This can then allow the designer(s) to pinpoint specific design interventions based on live feedback from geospatial information.Over the last 10 years, technology has facilitated an explosive growth in geodesign as both a framework for solving problems and a toolkit of geospatial analyses that feed into that framework. The growth of the Geodesign Summit in Redlands, CA from 2010 to 2014 is an example of the demand for this sort of framework.Parallel to the rise of geodesign, the tools represented by FOSS4G have also been evolving into sophisticated tools capable of taking on the needs of geodesign. However, to date there's been too little discussion of how to take the framework and working methods of geodesign and accomplish them with open source tools. This session will connect those dots by taking the typical parts of a geodesign framework (suitability analysis, sketching/designing, evaluating/comparing, iterating) and outlining our own experience making use of open source tools for geodesign. In particular, we will focus on how the interoperability of open source tools and the growth of web-based geospatial tools can support (and evolve!) the ways that geodesign is done.This presentation will address:What is geodesign: the conceptual framework and typical use cases for geodesignWhere are we: workflows and tool stacks we've used and seen others use to dateWhere could we go: identifying current gaps and pain points in existing stacks and possible solutions from emerging technologies
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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WPS Benchmarking Session

With the interrest for OGC Web Processing Service growing, we need to know details about the Open Source Solutions available. Various projects implementing WPS designed individuals from their community to participate in this talk to introduce their project and summarize their key features, they are the following: 52¡North WPS, Constellation SDI, GeoServer, PyWPS, ZOO-Project. For being able to provide good quality results, the tests should be run locally, so a server dedicated to this WPS Benchmarking Session, hosting OSGeoLive environments, is accessible to each team for running test procedures defined through discussions. The results of the given test procedures will be presented during this session and will compare implementations from different aspects: capabilities, compliancy, ressources usage and performance.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer #ProTips

MapServer is a fast, flexible and extremely powerful tool for creating dynamic maps for the Web. Underneath the hood, MapServer offers many powerful and advanced features that many users never dig into, and new features are being added constantly. Come learn about some of the more advanced features of MapServer, from heat maps to 3D WFS services to exporting data to GDAL file formats to very complex symbology and labeling. Learn simple and advanced use cases and debugging techniques for some of these advanced features from two presenters with over 20 years combined experience of using MapServer. A live MapServer instance will be used during this presentation (yes we are crazy!).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Making Space for Diverse Mappers

<p>Diverse communities provide the space for different points of view to find voice. Historically open source communities have balanced the contribution of various perspectives and expertises. We are often industry examples of remote cultural collaboration. But the nature of collaboration is changing, where diversity must stretch further across geographies to foster a wider scope of difference. One that includes the other sides of privileged space. In this session, I will present on why ideological diversity can be at the forefront of community structures by introducing three personal cornerstones - Mapzen, Maptime, and GeoNYC. This interactive session highlights how embracing a range of cultural perspectives and technical expertise allows communities to create the unexpected. We'll review success and challenges while performing our own mini GeoNYC complete with 3-word introductions and mapping fun. </p>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How Simplicity Will Save GIS

It's 2014 — we have consumer robots and electric cars, private spacecraft, planet colonization projects, and the Higgs Boson is confirmed, but GIS software is still a mess. You might be able to make sense of it all if you're a GIS specialist with an academic background, but other creative individuals — designers, developers, tinkerers of all kinds, each with a vision and desire to create meaningful and beautiful maps and visualizations — are constantly losing battles against bloat, clutter, and complexity.How do we reverse this GIS entropy? What does it take to turn complex technology into something that anyone can use and contribute to? An attempt to answer by the creator of Leaflet, a simple JS library that changed the world of online maps forever. 
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Manager's Guide to PostGIS

Your staff keep talking about this "PostGIS" thing, but what is it? Does anyone (important) else use it? What for?This talk gives a brief overview of the place of PostGIS in spatial IT architecture, how PostGIS compares to proprietary alternatives, who is using PostGIS, and how organizations transition to open source databases.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Do This, and also That: Integrating Open Source tools into traditional GIS shops"

This talk is intended for GIS users & managers who may be interested in open source GIS but aren't sure what the advantages to them might be, or who think Open Source GIS is nice in principle but are afraid there's no space for it in their workplace. In general, "Do This, and also That..." wants to address concerns of professionals who aren't sure how or why to make the leap from traditional/proprietary GIS tools into the wide world of Open Source GIS.Drawing from my own experiences, my goal is to gently present an integrated approach to open source GIS. This is not an "all or nothing" scenario: I want to show the audience how effective workflow solutions can involve both open source GIS as well as "traditional" proprietary GIS they are familiar with.I will briefly discuss common issues faced by GIS users, and explore the benefits of integrating open-source based workflows alongside proprietary GIS. I will cover use-cases for Leaflet and OpenLayers, OGR2OGR, PostGIS, and QGIS. Each use-case will demo a quick and friendly example of how a particular real-world issue might be addressed by the inclusion of one of these open source options into an existing GIS stack.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tilez: serving seamless polygons in the browser with TopoJSON and Node.js

This talk will introduce the Tilez project, which provides aNode.js-based realisation of a Tile Map Service tiles in both GeoJSON andTopoJSON formats. This formats provide a seamless and highly performant usermapping experience in both OpenLayers and Leaflet.The key to fast display of vector geometries in Tilezz lies in the use oftiles, which leverage both local and server-side caching. Whilst linear features lend themselves easily to tiling, polygons have traditionally represented more of a challenge.Tilez provides further efficiencies by using TopoJSON as a transport formatbetween the server and the client. Tilez implements all these improvements to support web-based vector tiling, delivering good performance under heavy load through Node,js and CouchDB-based caching, and efficient transport through TopoJSON. This talk will cover Tilez and the practical aspects of its implementation together with use cases from the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN - www.aurin.org.au).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNode for Humanitarian Crisis and Risk Reduction

GeoNode is a web-based application and platform for developing geospatial information systems (GIS) and for deploying spatial data infrastructures (SDI).The World Bank, the European Commission and the UN World Food Programme are among the major contributors and sustainers of the GeoNode project and they are using it for spatial data sharing and management projects.Being extremely active in the field of Humanitarian Crisis and Risk Reduction they have deployed custom GeoNode instances to support risk reduction and post crisis need assessment.During this talk three customized GeoNode instances will be presented, focusing the attention on their technology, usage for emergency preparedness and response, their federation and the added value provided by Open Source technologies for geospatial data sharing.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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CS-Map - coordinate system libraries

CS-Map is often used as a reference but has not been as widely adopted as proj4. This presentation describes how CS-Map has been used in a distributed geospatial database for big data.The presentation describes the benefits of CS-Map, in particular its whole earth support and also it disadvantages, primarily it is process locked.The aim of the presentation is to demonstrate that having more than one coordinate system library is a good thing and to encourage development of coordinate system libraries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Getting Started with OpenLayers 3

OpenLayers 3 is here! Now it's time to dive in and get mapping. Join us for an overview of OL3 from a user's perspective. We'll cover common use cases and cool features of the library you might not have heard about. Our goal in this presentation is to get you comfortable with the OpenLayers 3 style of mapping - providing an introduction to raster and vector basics, discussing tips for integration with other JavaScript libraries, and exposing you to the build tools so you can choose just the functionality you need for your mapping application.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Empowering people, popularizing open source, and building a business

Vizzuality went from a data communications consulting company to the creator of one of today's most popular online mapping frameworks, CartoDB. Four years ago, we recognized a major problem in open source geospatial tools, they were still prohibitively difficult to use to creating dynamic, interactive, and beautiful online maps. That was when we decided to build CartoDB, a mix of existing open source software such as PostGIS and our own new code. Each account on CartoDB represents a new PostGIS enabled database, a new user of libraries such as Leaflet, and we hope, a long-time supporter of open source. In this talk, I'll present on how we are building a new and quickly growing community around open source geospatial. I'll talk about our plans for the future and how we plan to support open source for many years to come.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Repurposing OpenTripPlanner for Ride Sharing

OpenTripPlanner is an open source application for building multi-modal itineraries using OpenStreetMap data about walking and driving routes and General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data for public transit data. With some creative adjustments, OpenTripPlanner can also be used to generate itineraries for ride sharing based on a pool of existing rides.This talk will demonstrate taking advantage of OpenTripPlanner's flexibility in this fashion. The example of repurposing OpenTripPlanner will serve as the basis for a more general discussion of ways that functionality relating to geospatial data can be reused in unanticipated ways.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
39:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Web and mobile enterprise applications

This presentation will discuss enterprise web mapping and mobile applications that we've been developing for large utilities and communications companies, based on a number of open source geospatial components, including PostGIS, MapFish, GeoServer and Leaflet. It will discuss development of offline mobile applications using both PhoneGap to compile to native applications on Android, iOS and Windows, using a SpatiaLite database, and also use of HTML5 offline storage. We will discuss ideas on how to create extremely easy to use but still powerful applications, using approaches inspired by consumer web mapping sites rather than traditional GIS. The presentation will not be deeply technical but will include material of interest to developers as well as end users and managers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapCache: Overview of MapServer's tile caching server

MapCache is the MapServer project's implementation of a tile caching server. It aims to be simple to install and configure, to be (very) fast (written in C and running as a native module under apache or nginx, or as a standalone fastcgi instance), and to be capable (services WMTS, googlemaps, virtualearth, KML, TMS, WMS). When acting as a WMS server, it will also respond to untiled GetMap requests, by dynamically merging multiple layers into a single image, and multiple tiles into an arbitrary image size. Multiple cache backends are included, allowing tiles to be stored and retrieved from file based databases (sqlite, mbtiles, berkeley-db), memcached instances, cloud REST containers (S3, Azure, Google Cloud Storage), or even directly from tiled TIFF files. Support of dimensions allows storing multiple versions of a tileset (e.g. one per customer), and time based requests can be dynamically served by interpreting and reassembling entries matching the requested time interval. MapCache can also be used to transparently speedup existing WMS instances, by intercepting getmap requests that can be served by tiles, and proxying all other requests to the original WMS server. Along with an overview of MapCache's functionalities, this presentation will also address real-world usecases and recommended configurations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoExt2 Ð Past, Present and Future

GeoExt is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha.Version 2 of GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/, released in October 2013) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and is built atop the newest official installments of its base libraries; OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 4.2.1.The talk of two GeoExt core developers and members of the PSC (Project Steering Committee) will shortly present the history of the project with a focus on how an international code sprint back in May 2012 lay the foundations of the 2.x-series of GeoExt. The current version will be presented and and we'll discuss new features and important changes for users of the framework. Especially the following aspects will be portrayed:- Usage of the new classes- Compatibility with the single-file build tool of Sencha- Integration into the ExtJS MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture- Better API-documentation- Easier theming of ExtJS/GeoExt applicationsAs both of the base libraries are about to release new major versions Ð OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 5 are very near to be being released in stable versions Ð the last focus of the talk will be the future development of the GeoExt 2 framework.The project has already pre-evaluated the possibility of supporting more than just one mapping library, so a future version of GeoExt might bring support for OpenLayers 3 and/or Leaflet and is likely being built on top of ExtJS 5.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Mapossum: A System for Creating, Collecting and Displaying Spatially-Referenced Answers to User-Contributed Questions

This project, originally inspired by the pop vs soda maps (www.popvssoda.com) seeks to create a web application where any question can be asked and answered by anyone with internet access. The Mapossum allows users to visualize spatial patterns in the questions they wish to pose without the need to possess the knowledge necessary to create maps of their own. The application creates a spatial web-survey system that harnesses the visualization power of a web map to explore the spatial components of question. As a tool it has the ability to help users reveal a different dimension of spatial interactions, and provides more insight into cultural and regional interactions. To accomplish this we have created a framework that abstracts the creation of questions and the logging of spatially referenced responses so that the answers can be mapped as points, or aggregated at various levels of administrative or political units (counties, states, countries). The application utilizes PostGIS/PostgreSQL to store and manipulate the data for the questions, responses, and other spatial data needed to support the application. The information is served as Web Mercator tiles using Python and Mapnik. On the front end these tiles and other data are consumed using the Leaflet JavaScript library. Users have the ability to create questions and the possible responses to these questions, as well as query the responses. The presentation will discuss the framework in detail, and we will demonstrate the use of the application for various types of question Ð response collection scenarios. The application has potential to be used as a general data collection tool for those collecting data in the field. We are also seeking to include the ability to couple the process of both answering and visualizing responses with social networking sites. The Mapossum couples a web-survey system with the visualization power of a web map to explore questions that have a spatial component to them as so many questions do.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Distributed Versioned Editing in Action

The concept of distributed versioned editing has been instantiated as GeoGit (http://geogit.org). This talk is about the practical application of both the concept and the software to empower people to collaboratively develop geospatial information in distributed and sometimes disconnected environments. The ROGUE team used GeoNode, GeoGit, and the OpenGeo Suite to provide a collaborative editing environment that maintains provenance of the data. The discussion will include an overview of how the technology is being used operationally in Honduras and for risk assessment and response. What worked, what didn't, and where can we take this next. I'll give you my opinion and I'd love to hear yours
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OnEarth: NASA's Boundless Solution to Rapidly Serving Geographic Imagery

OnEarth is an open source software package that efficiently serves georeferenced raster imagery with virtually zero latency, independent of image size or spatial resolution. The key to OnEarth's speed lies in the use of a unique, multi-resolution file format (Meta Raster Format, or MRF) combined with supporting open source software packages such as the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Apache to serve out images via web service protocols such as Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) and Tiled Web Map Service (TWMS), or visualization formats such as Keyhole Markup Language (KML). The emphasis on performance and scalability were strong drivers for developing this specialized package versus using existing software.While OnEarth is currently deployed operationally at several institutions, powering applications across the Earth Science and planetary spectrum, its active development is managed by NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) project. The purpose of GIBS is to provide a complementary historical and near real time (NRT) image archive to NASA's Earth Science data products for a multitude of uses: GIS ingestion, first responder and NRT applications, data search and discovery, decision support, education and outreach.Released as open source to GitHub in October 2013, NASA is encouraging members of the open source community to participate in the evolution of OnEarth—in the roles of developers, evaluators, and users—as a means to vet and enhance its capabilities. This leveraging of efforts not only benefits those who intend to use the software for their own endeavors, it effectively contributes back to NASA by strengthening GIBS and promoting the use and understanding of NASA's vast archive of science imagery and data. Several tools, including the GIBS reference client, Worldview, will be demonstrated as part of this presentation to illustrate the breadth of application and consistent image access speed across installations.https://github.com/nasa-gibs/onearth
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Creating Charts and Legends for 3D Atlas Maps - A Mashup of D3.js, osgEarth, and the Chromium Embedded Framework

This presentation introduces a mashup of the JavaScript library D3.js, the virtual globe toolkit osgEarth, and the web browser engine Chromium Embedded Framework. Using the example of a national atlas, it is demonstrated how these OpenSource frameworks facilitate the creation of charts and legends for a series of three-dimensional maps.First, it is explained how a map in osgEarth can be styled with D3 scale functions. Legends for choropleth, line, symbol, and grid maps are derived therefrom. They allow to depict unique values, value ranges, and combinations of those having two dependent variables. Also legend templates for color gradients and hierarchical categories have been developed. All legends are superimposed the virtual globe by means of the Chromium Embedded Framework.Next, six widely used chart types - i.e. pie, ring, wing, divided area, bar, and divergent bar charts - with individual properties are presented. Charts are defined with aforementioned styling functions, created with D3.js, and displayed as billboards in the virtual globe.Finally, a live demo is shown, current limitations are discussed and future work of the atlas project is outlined.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:55 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fixing GIS Data Discovery

Discovery of GIS data is broken. It is overly complicated and incomplete. Organizations spend time and money on creation and acquisition of data, yet it sits on hard drives, dvd's, and shelves without a straightforward way for others to discover it. Discovery tools that do exist have usability issues which alienate users and prevent wide adoption. Too often, data discovery is an afterthought, grafted onto tools that have been designed for analysis, or treated as one feature among many in a map portal. Thus these tools attempt to serve every possible user need and in the process become unusable. Simply put, we need an application which enables discovery of GIS data with an emphasis on user experience, integrates seamlessly with other tools, and streamlines the use and organization of geospatial data.We present GeoBlacklight, a collaboratively designed and developed open source software focused on discovery use cases. The project builds on existing, widely adopted open source projects. GeoBlacklight fills the gap in discovery tools for geospatial data by providing a simple, yet powerful intuitive interface. To reach this goal, Stanford University embarked upon a comprehensive design process. Our process includes an environmental scan, stakeholder interviews, user interviews, inter-institutional collaboration, and rapid prototyping. We will present the user personas that have been distilled from our interviews, the user stories and feature prioritization process these inform, and prototypes of the software we have developed so far, as well as plans for future development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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State of QGIS Server

QGIS server continues to grow with an active community and expanding user base. Besides new styling features shared with QGIS desktop, new services have been added continuously. OGC WFS (Web Feature Service) and WFS-T were the first additions to WMS, recently followed by an OGC WCS (Web Coverage Service) implementation. The map service itself also got several additions besides the GetPrint request for delivering PDF outputs made with QGIS print composer. Performance and scalabilty has been steadily improved and brought to the same level as other established map servers. PDF outputs got recently support for dynamic texts and images (e.g. QR codes) and server-side GeoJSON rendering allowing redlining implementations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)