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32:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Barriers to FOSS4G Adoption: OSGeo-Live case study

OSGeo-Live is a Linux distribution, available in virtual machine, bootable DVD, or bootable USB formats, containing a curated collection of the latest and best Free and Open Source Geospatial (FOSS4G) applications. This talk investigates the correlations between worldwide download distribution, and community participation against indicators of economic, technical knowledge and socio-cultural barriers to geospatial technology and FOSS adoption. Better understanding the barriers of technology transfer are important to the outreach efforts of the FOSS4G community, and understanding the market development potential of FOSS4G around the world.Results of an analysis of the OSGeo-Live community will be shown but the techniques discussed can be applied to any software project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OSGeo Incubation

The Open Source Geospatial Foundation does much more than hold FOSS4G each year.This talk will look into what makes OSGeo a software foundation. What software foundations have to offer members, software projects and developers.This talk is structured around the "incubation" process by which new software projects join the OSGeo.If you are new to open source take this is a great chance to see how OSGeo evaluates software projects and how these checks protect you!For managers it is especially important to understand the risks associated with the use of open source. Understand what assurances OSGeo incubation offers, how to double check the results, and what factors are left for your own risk assessment.If you are a developer considering getting involved in OSGeo this is great talk to learn what is involved, how much work it will be, and how you can start!Come see what makes OSGeo more than a user group!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to MapGuide

This class is for those who want to fast-track into installing and using MapGuide Open Source. MapGuide Server and Web Extensions are set up in the Workshop (Windows). MapGuide Maestro (Windows) is used to load and connect to GIS data, create layers, author maps and publish web sites.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:09 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Don't Copy Data! Instead, Share it at Web-Scale

Since its start in 2006, Amazon Web Services has grown to over 40 different services. S3, our object store, one of our first services, is now home to trillions of objects and regularly peaks at 1.5 million requests/second. S3 is used to store many data types, including map tiles, genome data, video, and database backups. This presentation's primary goal is to illustrate best practice around open data sets on AWS. To do so, it showcases a simple map tiling architecture, built using just a few of those services, CloudFront (CDN), S3 (object Store), and Elastic Beanstalk (Application Management) in combination with FOSS tools, Leaflet, Mapserver/GDAL and Yas3fs. My demo will use USDA's NAIP dataset (48TB), plus other higher resolution data at the city level, and show how you can deliver images derived from over 219,000 GeoTIFFs to both TMS and OGC WMS clients for the 48 States, without pre-caching tiles while keeping your server environment appropriately sized via auto-scaling. Because the NAIP data sits in a requester-pays bucket that allows authenticated read access, anyone with an AWS account has immediate access to the source GeoTIFFs, and can copy the data in bulk to anywhere they desire. However, I will show that the pay-for-use model of the cloud, allows for open-data architectures that are not possible with on-prem environments, and that for certain kinds of data, especially BIG data, rather than move the data, it makes more sense to use it in-situ in an environment that can support demanding SLAs.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
30:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Quadcopter GIS for less than 700 - Hardware and software to map your local community

Quadcopter - Phantom FC40 (500). Camera - Canon PowerShot ELPH 130 IS 16.0 MP (110). Opportunity to engage your local community to produce open data - priceless.Let's get to the point. Let's talk about hardware and software to get out there and actually map some stuff with a quadcopter. This is the story of my adventures hacking with a Phantom quadcopter over the last 10 months to make local maps... and of course have fun. The only rules... it has to be cheap and the software has to be open source.We will go through the hardware, including purchasing, setting up, and flying the quadcopter. The camera is hacked with CHDK and strapped on the quadcopter with some velcro to a vibration dampener cut up with a dremel tool. The processing software is a pain to install, but we will talk through it including software options, how to get your processing off loaded to your video card GPU, and how we as a community can make all this easier in the future. Finally, we will look at what you can actually make... including mosaics, 3d models, and DEM's of your local community.Quadcopters are cheap, fun, and amazing for engaging your local community to produce open data. Let's do it!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
30:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Geospatial-Semantic Knowledge Management and Linked Data for Humanitarian Assistance

The challenges to sharing knowledge during humanitarian events are well documented. Of these, the lack of effective and meaningful communication between all actors in an event is the root cause of many of the inefficiencies that hinder the ultimate goal of relieving suffering and rebuilding societies. This presentation outlines an approach for applying semantic knowledge management, ontological rules, and Linked Data approaches to address these issues. We introduce semLayer, a geospatially-enabled Semantic MediaWiki prototype application with mobile and wiki-based collection components, built using open source constituent technologies. We will discuss specifically the integration of PostGIS as a data store, and how this approach compares to open source triples stores/frameworks (e.g. Apache Jena) that perform geospatial operations using the GeoSPARQL specification. We will then move into considerations of integrating micro-, domain-, and upper-ontologies and vocabularies, and defining rules that govern relationships between data and entities, including geospatial attributes. We will close with a discussion of contributing to a disaster response use case with a Linked Data approach.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Manager's Guide to PostGIS

Your staff keep talking about this "PostGIS" thing, but what is it? Does anyone (important) else use it? What for?This talk gives a brief overview of the place of PostGIS in spatial IT architecture, how PostGIS compares to proprietary alternatives, who is using PostGIS, and how organizations transition to open source databases.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenSource GIS surveying - water application

It became possible lately to deploy a full OpenSource application stack for field surveying. This presentation describes a water distribution and waste-water management project from a technical point of view, with a strong integration of mobile tools within an industrialized GIS.This projects features a GIS part, with a centralized reference data storage leveraging PostgreSQL/PostGIS, and uses QGIS as a user interface. This combination allows to manage custom data with high volumes efficiently. The project also includes an important mobile side. Implemented on a rugged tablet, a custom tool has been setup to capture and enrich field data. The software is based on ROAM, a new OpenSource software designed for field survey. The tablet is connected on a 3G/4G network and takes advantage of a GNSS antenna to increase GPS precision. It also features an autonomous offline data management module, so as to be able to work in bad network access conditions. The tablet also embeds all required data for greater efficiency. One specificity of this project is the implementation of a synchronization tool between the data used in mobile situation and the reference data, in a multi-user environment.This synchronization tool, developed with PostGIS and SpatiaLite, let users manage data history, data modifications, data merges, offline mode, as well as branches, for parallel versions of the same data. The latter enables the design of evolution scenarios of the network. A classic issue of the surveying work in mobile situation is therefore solved, being able to work in a disconnected mode with multiple land surveying teams smoothly, while keeping data traceability.The project currently evolves towards water simulation integration, interconnection with SCADA industrial systems, and sensor data automated integration (through webservices).All These components therefore constitute a full software package, fully opensource. The various components can be used for other applications than water management. The new features developed thanks to this project can solve mobile GIS issues, and optimize the TCO of GIS solutions for industrial projects, for real-world critical applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Leaflet + UtfGrids + d3.js = liquid fast, massively scalable interactive web map & data visualization

I will discuss and demo how I use Leaflet, UtfGrids, and D3.js in concert to view and interact with large geographic data on the web. This presentation will not be on d3.js, but rather how to get geographic data from a map to a d3.js chart. I will illustrate why this stack is liquid fast and massively scalable and discus in some detail what a UtfGrid is, how it works and how to create and server them to the web. The context of my work:I am currently working on an open source project called OpenQuake. As a part of this project we are developing a platform which serves as a hub for integrated risk assessment. It allows users to combine seismic hazard, risk and social vulnerability in many different ways in order to obtain output for science, risk assessment, risk awareness and risk management.All my work is available on Github and links will be provided to all demonstrated material.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Managing public data on GitHub: Pay no attention to that git behind the curtain

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) continuously solicits feedback on transportation data from local government partners. Historically, this process has taken the form of lots of markings on plotted maps with immeasurable amounts of manual work on the tail end to organize and interpret this feedback. Many tools developed specifically for this process today often fall short of the needs of agencies (such as geospatial presentation and tracking comments), yet the cost to develop or implement custom software is generally out of reach for government agencies.This presentation introduces a case study of the process to develop geospatial collaboration tools for managing transportation data directly hosted on GitHub pages (currently in development at http://atlregional.github.io/plan-it/ and http://atlregional.github.io/fc-review/). This approach was partially inspired by GitHub's recent features additions that make collaborating on geospatial data simple and elegant. Because these data span both functional and jurisdictional divisions, many of the greatest challenges have been project management related --- coordinating stakeholder feedback and project requirements. However, by utilizing the existing git/GitHub infrastructure, many of these requirements can be managed cost effectively. Moreover, the framework allows for direct integration with other application environments via the GitHub API and GDAL Tools, ensuring that local modifications to project data are committed back to the data repository.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions.Advancements and improvements for the management of raster mosaic and pyramids will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the latest developments for the exploitation of GDAL raster sources.Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields.The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on the JAITools and ImageIO-Ext projects. JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support. ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries.The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using OpenStreetMap Infrastructure to Collect Data for our National Parks

The National Park Service has many well-known sites, but many parks do not have the GIS resources to maintain their map data. The Places project aims to solve this problem by empowering non-technical park employees and the public with the ability to make changes to the map. The Places project uses custom versions of existing OpenStreetMap tools for data collection and uses them to create an up-to-date base map for National Park web sites. This presentation will discuss how we plan to motivate mappers, how we deal with data validation, and how we plan to continue working with OpenStreetMap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Assessing the distribution of disease vectors and fruit crop pests from satellite in GRASS GIS 7

Over the past decades, disease vectors like the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) transmitting Dengue Fever and other infections and the Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), an economically important fruit crop pest, have continued to globally expand. In Europe, the already invaded areas comprise the Mediterranean basin while the spread to the north of the Alps is ongoing. Likewise many regions in the world face an increasing risk for new or re-emerging vector-borne diseases transmitted by mosquitoes. Given this spread, there is an urgent need to gain better understanding of spatio-temporal patterns in disease transmission and agro-pest diffusion. The life cycles of mosquitoes and fruit flies depend on climatic and environmental conditions which can be observed using satellite sensors. We identified the potential distribution areas linked to the current climatic suitability through the evaluation of remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) data for Northern Italy and Switzerland. For this we processed with GRASS GIS 7 more than a decade of daily MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite sensor data at continental scale (250 m resolution, four maps per day) as an alternative to meteorological data. Since LST data often contain gaps due to cloud cover, these gaps were filled by reconstructing any missing LST values before environmental indicators have been derived from these data. From the gap-filled LST data (in the multi terabyte range) we derived threshold maps like January mean temperatures as a threshold to estimate the survival chances of overwintering diapausing eggs, whereas the annual mean temperature can be used as a threshold to estimate population stability. We derived growing degree days (GDD) as well by temporal aggregation. The approach can be applied to continents other than Europe, too. The resulting potential distribution maps can be leveraged to assess the spread of disease vectors and agro-pests in order to assist decision makers and public health authorities to develop surveillance plans and vector control.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoScript - A Geospatial Swiss Army Knife

GeoScript adds spatial capabilities to dynamic scripting languages that run on the JVM. With implementations in Python, JavaScript, Scala, and Groovy, GeoScript provides an interface to the powerful data access, processing and rendering functionality of the GeoTools library.GeoScript provides concise and simple apis that allow developers to perform tasks quickly making it a great tool for the day to day data juggling that comes with geopspatial data. This talk will focus mainly on real world examples that showcase the power of the library.Come check this talk out if you are interested in learning about a new tool to add to your geospatial hacking toolbox. Maybe you have tried to use GeoTools but find it too difficult and complex to use. Or perhaps your java skills are not where you would like them to be. If that is the case this talk, and GeoScript, might be just what you are looking for.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ILWIS, the next generation tool framework for GIS and remote sensing

The Integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS, http://52north.org/communities/ilwis/) is a GIS and remote sensing software integrating raster, vector and thematic data set processing into a desktop application. ILWIS is hosted under the umbrella of the 52North project and managed and maintained by ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands. ILWIS is currently subject to a significant refactoring and modularization process referred to as ILWIS Next Generation (ILWIS NG). This will increase attractiveness for developers and lowers their entry requirements. It will provide a sustainable code base for the next decade and allows for integration with other open source software. Beneficiaries are researchers, educators and project executers. It will allow them to use GIS and remote sensing functionality in an easy and interoperable manner on a single desktop and in a web and/or mobile environment in order to integrate their work with others in a standardized way. Based on requirements analysis meetings with a small team at ITC, an architecture was created to host the modular components of ILWIS NG. The implementation of this architecture was started in 2013 and comprised the creation of the QT-based core software centered around a plug-in concept which supports connectors. This supports different data formats and interfaces to other software packages. As first extensions, a Python API and WFS have been developed and data connectors to PostgreSQL and OGC's SWE are underway, as well as a flexible mobile app environment, making it possible to configure lightweight GIS apps within a very short time. The presentation will embark upon the justification of starting the software refactoring and will provide an overview of the new modular architecture, giving insight into the design choices which were made. The presentation will also expose the GIS and image processing functionalities within ILWIS and how they are made available in the new interoperable setup indicating the libraries and standards on which they are based. Examples will be given on the many projects in which ITC has used ILWIS already and the potential use of ILWIS Next Generation in combination with OSGEO projects in the future.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Choose your own Adventure - Open Source Spatial on OpenShift

Learn how to build quick and easy open source mapping solutions using several different languages and datastores. Well start by selecting our source data, and a database to house it. Then, we'll pick language and a simple microframework to power a basic REST API. Finally, we add Leaflet Maps for user-facing data visualization and controls. Feel free to bring a laptop and follow along to launch your very own mapping application during this short talk.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoExt2 Ð Past, Present and Future

GeoExt is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha.Version 2 of GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/, released in October 2013) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and is built atop the newest official installments of its base libraries; OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 4.2.1.The talk of two GeoExt core developers and members of the PSC (Project Steering Committee) will shortly present the history of the project with a focus on how an international code sprint back in May 2012 lay the foundations of the 2.x-series of GeoExt. The current version will be presented and and we'll discuss new features and important changes for users of the framework. Especially the following aspects will be portrayed:- Usage of the new classes- Compatibility with the single-file build tool of Sencha- Integration into the ExtJS MVC (Model-View-Controller) architecture- Better API-documentation- Easier theming of ExtJS/GeoExt applicationsAs both of the base libraries are about to release new major versions Ð OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 5 are very near to be being released in stable versions Ð the last focus of the talk will be the future development of the GeoExt 2 framework.The project has already pre-evaluated the possibility of supporting more than just one mapping library, so a future version of GeoExt might bring support for OpenLayers 3 and/or Leaflet and is likely being built on top of ExtJS 5.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Mapossum: A System for Creating, Collecting and Displaying Spatially-Referenced Answers to User-Contributed Questions

This project, originally inspired by the pop vs soda maps (www.popvssoda.com) seeks to create a web application where any question can be asked and answered by anyone with internet access. The Mapossum allows users to visualize spatial patterns in the questions they wish to pose without the need to possess the knowledge necessary to create maps of their own. The application creates a spatial web-survey system that harnesses the visualization power of a web map to explore the spatial components of question. As a tool it has the ability to help users reveal a different dimension of spatial interactions, and provides more insight into cultural and regional interactions. To accomplish this we have created a framework that abstracts the creation of questions and the logging of spatially referenced responses so that the answers can be mapped as points, or aggregated at various levels of administrative or political units (counties, states, countries). The application utilizes PostGIS/PostgreSQL to store and manipulate the data for the questions, responses, and other spatial data needed to support the application. The information is served as Web Mercator tiles using Python and Mapnik. On the front end these tiles and other data are consumed using the Leaflet JavaScript library. Users have the ability to create questions and the possible responses to these questions, as well as query the responses. The presentation will discuss the framework in detail, and we will demonstrate the use of the application for various types of question Ð response collection scenarios. The application has potential to be used as a general data collection tool for those collecting data in the field. We are also seeking to include the ability to couple the process of both answering and visualizing responses with social networking sites. The Mapossum couples a web-survey system with the visualization power of a web map to explore questions that have a spatial component to them as so many questions do.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Cartography from code...?

Nowadays we see, specifically on the Web, maps that are interactive, creative, as well as beautiful and effective. And more and more these maps are no longer "drawn", by hand or computer, but "coded". Programmed. In this talk we show that with modern programming tools, such as the popular D3 API, the results can be as good or better, even to the most discerning cartographer. And we discuss the question "can programmers be cartographers, or should cartographers become programmers...?"
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tracking Slippy Map Analytics

Google Analytics is a great tool for monitoring and reporting on website traffic and user interactions but what it doesn't tell you is that 75% of the time your user's zoom in two levels every time they start to use your map or that external soils layer you added is taking an average three seconds to load. Client side map monitoring adds the missing chapters needed to complete your geo-analytics storybook.We'll briefly walk-through how to setup your slippy map to start tracking analytics, what can be tracked, and what can be discovered.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Big (enough) data and strategies for distributed geoprocessing

Big data gets a lot of press these days, but even if you're not geocoding the Twitter firehose, "big enough" data can be a pain - whether you're crashing your database server or simply running out of RAM. Distributed geoprocessing can be even more painful, but for the right job it's a revelation!This session will explore strategies you can use to unlock the power of distributed geoprocessing for the "big enough" datasets that make your life difficult. Granted, geospatial data doesn't always fit cleanly into Hadoop's MapReduce framework. But with a bit of creativity - think in-memory joins, hyper-optimized data schemas, and offloading work to API services or PostGIS - you too can get Hadoop MapReduce working on your geospatial data!Real-world examples will be taken from work on GlobalForestWatch.org, a new platform for exploring and analyzing global data on deforestation. I'll be demoing key concepts using Cascalog, a Clojure wrapper for the Cascading Java library that makes Hadoop and Map/Reduce a lot more palatable. If you prefer Python or Scala, there are wrappers for you too.Hadoop is no silver bullet, but for the right geoprocessing job it's a powerful tool.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Avoiding Burnout, and Other Essentials of Open Source Self-Care

As technical community managers we are faced with a unique set of challenges. Like most FOSS community members, we're often volunteers, but the work we do in moderating mailing lists, planning events, fielding project feedback and contributions, and being the public face of our communities can take an additional emotional toll. We do it because we love our communities, but we also are often guilty of neglecting our own very real needs in order to serve those communities. We end up feeling guilty, run down, inadequate, and ultimately burnt out.Does this sound like you? Even if you don't do community management work, you might have run into some of the same frustrations. In this talk I'll share with you my own experiences in building and managing different geo communities. Through my own lessons learned, I'll strive to help you think about ways to:- Ensure you have adequate support in your work- Build a vocabulary to talk and think about the challenges you face- Feel empowered to say no and to allow yourself time away from the project- Recognizing and handling burnout- Avoiding burnout next time around
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Accurate polygon search in Lucene Spatial (with performance benefits to boot!)

Lucene, and the NoSQL stores that leverage it, support storage and searching of polygonal records. However the spatial index implementation traditionally has returned false matches to spatial queries.We have contributed a new spatial indexing strategy to Lucene Spatial that returns fully accurate results (i.e. exact matches only).Better still, this new spatial search strategy often enables keeping a smaller index and and faster retrieval of results.I will illustrate why false matches happen -- this requires a high-level walkthrough of spatial index trees -- and real world cases where it makes a difference.Our initial workaround was to query Elasticsearch through a separate server layer that post-filters Elasticsearch results against the query shape, removing the false matches.We've now built a similar approach into Lucene Spatial itself. By virtue of living inside, this new solution can take advantage of numerous efficiencies:1. it filters away false matches before fetching their document contents;2. it uses a binary serialization that is far faster than the GeoJSON we used before;3. it optimizes the tradeoff between work done in the index tree vs. post-filtering, often resulting in a smaller index and faster querying. I will provide benchmark numbers.I'll illustrate how developers and database administrators can use this improvement in their own databases (it's easy!).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)