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31:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A glimpse of FOSS4G in the environmental consulting arena

In the highly competitive world of environmental consulting, being able to manage large volumes of data and deliver timely, accurate information based on that data is critical to our ongoing success. As a relatively small company, we recognized that we needed something unique to survive and prosper in an industry dominated by huge corporations. Over the past 7 years we have made a considerable effort to shift over to a FOSS4G environment, with a belief that, not only would this decision enhance what we already do well, but give us the competitive edge we would need to ensure future prosperity.A brief presentation of a snapshot of our current FOSS4G status, how we arrived here and a workflow tour beginning at the data acquisition stage looking at the feed through our patented EDMS QA/QC system into PostgreSQL followed by a demonstration of a just a few of our many custom web/mobile/desktop applications that rely on the PostgreSQL back end database and how these solutions are able to deliver accurate and timely information to employees and clients alike, and finally, where to next.We take advantage of multiple FOSS4G including the likes of OpenLayers, MapServer, PostgreSQL/PostGIS, PHP, D3 and jQuery. This combination places us in an ideal position to respond to client needs with the ability to rapidly deliver almost any request.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The role of geospatial open source (FOSS4G) as a component of hybrid systems

Currently, it is rare that an organization faces a choice between "just commercial" or "just open source" geospatial software. Increasingly, the answer isn't about "or", it is now about solutions that may involve both. Indeed, Commercial systems - both installed software and cloud-based platforms - may have both functional and cost effectiveness gaps. Free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G) can be a critical component that helps to bridge these gaps. And, given that organizations may have large existing investments and sunk costs in commercial software it can make sense to leverage those investments by building hybrid systems that incorporate open source components. This presentation will describe several specific examples of hybrid systems that incorporate geospatial open source (e.g., OpenGeo Suite) alongside both Esri and Google components. The presentation will focus on both the business reasoning for choosing hybrid as well as the technical approaches taken. Ultimately, hybrid projects or systems can be very important as they provide a key entry-point for geospatial open source into organizations that might not otherwise consider it.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Introduction to the geospatial goodies in Elasticsearch

In this session we'll introduce how you can work with spatial data in Elasticsearch - The Open Source, distributed, RESTful Search Engine. We'll provide a general introduction on how to index spatial data into Elasticsearch, then cover off on using spatial query and filters, before finishing up showing you how you can visualise and interact with spatial data stored in Elasticsearch using Kibana.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How to tell stories and engage an audience with maps

Maps and stories go together like two peas in a pod. Why is that and how do we take advantage of it? Through my work at CartoDB, I have been able to think deeply about the role of storytelling for today's map makers. Here, I will talk about the insights we have gained through teaching CartoDB users, building libraries such as Torque and Odyssey.js, and creating innovative maps online. Some of my maps have included FOSS4G award winners (NYCHenge and PLUTO Data Tour) as well as dozens of unique and interesting experiments to combine interaction and multimedia with maps or trying to find the limits of what we call a map. If we plan to keep mapping relevant and exciting, it is important that we keep finding the exciting new ways to bend technology to engage people. The map has an interesting future over the coming years and here I will talk about some of the ways we should expect it to go and what it means for us as geospatial software developers.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Responsive Interactivity: Toward User-centered Adaptive Map Experiences

In recent years, the web design community has moved quickly to accommodate the various devices and methods for accessing web content. The FOSS4G and wider development community have responded to this paradigm of adapting the layout of content to scale to the device of the user by creating and leveraging tools such as Leaflet and D3. However, there remains a lack of knowledge, understanding, and conversation about what it truly means to create a map experience that meets the present needs and expectations of the user. Designing an adaptive map should go beyond simply fitting it into a responsive layout. User variables, such as the mode of interaction and location-based needs, raise map-specific UI design questions that this community is uniquely positioned to answer.This talk will explore what it could mean cartographically and experientially to adapt all aspects of the map experience to the needs of the user using principles already embraced in other communities. Our goal is to provoke a wider discussion of how we, as a community, can work toward these objectives. Regardless of expertise level, anyone who is involved with the creation of interactive web maps has inevitably come across the problems associated with, and will benefit from involvement in this conversation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
40:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source is People

Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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projections in web browsers are terrible and you should be ashamed of yourself

The JavaScript port of proj4 was (relatively) recently moved from subversion to github and updated to use modern build tools.The talk will discuss some of the differences between desktop and web environments when it comes to projections and CRS, other new projects that take a different perspective on projections (like topojson), and why you can't just use an EPSG number in your browser (and should be ashamed of yourself wanting to).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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"Sliding" datasets together for more automated map tracing

Importing new/updated geometry into large dataset like Open Street Map is tricky business. Features represented in both need to be detected and merged. Often times editors are asked to completely "retrace" over updated maps as automated methods are unreliable.While a 100% accurate merge is impossible, it is possible to auto create a best guess and let the user refine from there, eliminating as many manual, tedious steps as possible.Slide is a tool designed to solve this problem and works by iteratively refining roads, trails and other complex geometries to match another dataset, where the features are correctly mapped. In a single click one geometry is "slided" to the other, eliminating hundreds of tedious clicks.The form of the new dataset is flexible. It could be an updated representation of roads such as the new TIGER database, a scanned historical paper map, or a large collection of GPS data points like the 250+ billion made available by Strava, a fitness tracking website.Overall, Slide is designed to leverage what we already know, collected in various datasets, to speed map tracing. Map editors should be focusing on higher level challenges and not just retracing over another dataset.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A User-centered Design for Interactive Masking Capability within Web GIS

This presentation will discuss the design of interactive raster masking capability for a web-based geographic information system (Web GIS) from the perspective of user-centered design. A case study will be presented by analyzing and discussing specific aspects of the user-developer dialog within the context of the software development life cycle. The presented case study will take the audience through the development of an open-source Web GIS software architecture (MapServer, PostGIS and OpenLayers) with particular focus on how the masking functionality was designed and implemented. Software engineering techniques informed by iterative cognitive walkthrough allowed for a dialog between Web GIS production and consumption that led to a more usable and useful cartographic interface. Key findings from this case study will be presented.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Making Space for Diverse Mappers

<p>Diverse communities provide the space for different points of view to find voice. Historically open source communities have balanced the contribution of various perspectives and expertises. We are often industry examples of remote cultural collaboration. But the nature of collaboration is changing, where diversity must stretch further across geographies to foster a wider scope of difference. One that includes the other sides of privileged space. In this session, I will present on why ideological diversity can be at the forefront of community structures by introducing three personal cornerstones - Mapzen, Maptime, and GeoNYC. This interactive session highlights how embracing a range of cultural perspectives and technical expertise allows communities to create the unexpected. We'll review success and challenges while performing our own mini GeoNYC complete with 3-word introductions and mapping fun. </p>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How Simplicity Will Save GIS

It's 2014 — we have consumer robots and electric cars, private spacecraft, planet colonization projects, and the Higgs Boson is confirmed, but GIS software is still a mess. You might be able to make sense of it all if you're a GIS specialist with an academic background, but other creative individuals — designers, developers, tinkerers of all kinds, each with a vision and desire to create meaningful and beautiful maps and visualizations — are constantly losing battles against bloat, clutter, and complexity.How do we reverse this GIS entropy? What does it take to turn complex technology into something that anyone can use and contribute to? An attempt to answer by the creator of Leaflet, a simple JS library that changed the world of online maps forever. 
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNetwork opensource 3.0

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. GeoNetwork opensource 3.0 comes with a new, clean user interface based on AngularJS, Bootstrap and D3. Other topics presented are related to performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will also be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals as well as work for Environment Canada and the collaboration with the OpenGeoPortal project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Development and Evolution of an open source mapping application within the USG <- Now with More Google Glass

The United States Government has a history of developing applications using legacy systems and continuing to use brittle software. This approach has managed to minimize data collection, sharing and use of open standards. With this in mind NGA has several groups focused on a rapid, innovative, and open approaches to application development. One of the recent applications developed in this fashion is the Mobile Analytic GEOINT Environment (MAGE), which evolved from earlier applications that were used for Disaster Response as well as various special events. Each of these earlier applications had their own strengths and weaknesses that were factored in during the development of MAGE. MAGE is built on an open source stack with a mobile and html5 application designed for geospatial data collection, imagery sharing, tracking, and communication. It is designed to be a lightweight, fully portable software stack that can be placed in front or behind firewalls with ease. It is fully customizable to a wide variety of mission needs so administrators can easily change the data collection parameters. MAGE is fully service enabled allowing easy access to the data via REST requests and returns multiple formats including GeoJSON, KML, and Shapefile to ensure ease of access and sharing. The app has also been ported to Google Glass for field collection and enhanced visualization.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenLayers 3: a unique mapping library

We've rewritten OpenLayers from the ground up with the goal of offering a powerful, high-performance library leveraging the latest in web technologies. This talk will present the latest advances of the library, focusing on aspects that make OpenLayers 3 stand out. OpenLayers 3, for example, uses technologies, techniques and algorithms that enable high-quality and high-performance vector rendering. Come learn about the optimizations and techniques OpenLayers 3 uses internally, and how you can leverage them in your next web-mapping applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Leaflet + UtfGrids + d3.js = liquid fast, massively scalable interactive web map & data visualization

I will discuss and demo how I use Leaflet, UtfGrids, and D3.js in concert to view and interact with large geographic data on the web. This presentation will not be on d3.js, but rather how to get geographic data from a map to a d3.js chart. I will illustrate why this stack is liquid fast and massively scalable and discus in some detail what a UtfGrid is, how it works and how to create and server them to the web. The context of my work:I am currently working on an open source project called OpenQuake. As a part of this project we are developing a platform which serves as a hub for integrated risk assessment. It allows users to combine seismic hazard, risk and social vulnerability in many different ways in order to obtain output for science, risk assessment, risk awareness and risk management.All my work is available on Github and links will be provided to all demonstrated material.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Empowering people, popularizing open source, and building a business

Vizzuality went from a data communications consulting company to the creator of one of today's most popular online mapping frameworks, CartoDB. Four years ago, we recognized a major problem in open source geospatial tools, they were still prohibitively difficult to use to creating dynamic, interactive, and beautiful online maps. That was when we decided to build CartoDB, a mix of existing open source software such as PostGIS and our own new code. Each account on CartoDB represents a new PostGIS enabled database, a new user of libraries such as Leaflet, and we hope, a long-time supporter of open source. In this talk, I'll present on how we are building a new and quickly growing community around open source geospatial. I'll talk about our plans for the future and how we plan to support open source for many years to come.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adding value to Open Data using Open Source GIS.

New Zealand, like many other countries around the world, is developing Government policies requiring open access to public data. The National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has been directed to make subtantial parts of its fisheries, climate, coastal, oceanic and freshwater data more publicly available for re-use. NIWA recognises that making such data available is of very limited value, if potential users do not have access to suitable tools to work with these data, ie: GIS applications. As part of its Open Data programme, NIWA's Fisheries and Environmental Centers have funded enhancements to an Open Source GIS application, QGIS, and made this application available as a free download, along with NIWA data. This approach enables the effective re-use of NIWA (and other agencies') environmental and spatial data by individuals and organisations who otherwise have little or no access to commercial GIS tools. This presentation discusses the value of Open Source (and Open Standards) to support Open Data initiatives, and NIWA's experiences along the way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Using OpenStreetMap Infrastructure to Collect Data for our National Parks

The National Park Service has many well-known sites, but many parks do not have the GIS resources to maintain their map data. The Places project aims to solve this problem by empowering non-technical park employees and the public with the ability to make changes to the map. The Places project uses custom versions of existing OpenStreetMap tools for data collection and uses them to create an up-to-date base map for National Park web sites. This presentation will discuss how we plan to motivate mappers, how we deal with data validation, and how we plan to continue working with OpenStreetMap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fiona and Rasterio: Data Access for Python Programmers and Future Python Programmers

Fiona and Rasterio are new GDAL-based Python libraries that embody lessonslearned over a decade of using GDAL and Python to solve geospatial problems.Among these lessons: the importance of productivity, enjoyability, andserendipity to both experts and beginners.I will discuss the motivation for writing Fiona and Rasterio and explain howand why they diverge from other GIS software and embrace Python's native types,protocols, and idioms. I will also explain why they adhere to some GISparadigms and bend or break others. Finally, I will show examples of using Fiona and Rasterio to read, manipulate,and write raster and vector data. Some examples will be familiar to users ofolder Python GIS software and will illustrate how Fiona and Rasterio let youget more done with less code and fewer bugs. I will also demonstrate fun anduseful features not found in other geospatial libraries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Crazy data: Using PostGIS to fix errors and handle difficult datasets

Inteligeo is a system that stores a lot of information used by the Brazilian Federal Police Forensics to fight crime, initially in the environmental arena with a later expansion to other types of crime. During the construction of the database a lot of problems appeared for which PostGIS was the key to the solution.This presentation describes problems encountered by the team while loading 850+ shapefiles into the database, linking with external databases and building 950+ views of the data.Although the content of the recipes is very technical, the general concepts will be explained in an accessible language and correlated to real world cases.Topics:*Definition of crazy data in our context*Quick recipes- Spike removal- Invalid geometry detection and fixing- Filling holes- Raster image footprints- Hammering data into correct topologies- Speeding data visualization with ST Simplify and PGSQL 9.3's materialized views- Rough georeferencing using an auxiliary table- Creating constraints*How is crazy data generated and our experience in handling each case- Large datasets- Lack of validation- Reprojection- Geometric operations- Topological errors- Imprecise definitions- Legacy databases- Bad georeferencingWe will also discuss why is handling crazy data important for the Brazilian Federal Police, our efforts in cleaning up data at the source and the implications of geographical data in general for fighting crime.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Extracting geographic data from Wikipedia

A large fraction of Wikipedia's millions of articles include geographic references. This makes Wikipedia a potentially rich source for themed, curated geographic datasets. But the free form nature of Wikipedia's markup language presents some technical challenges. I'll walk through the Wikipedia API, show how to get to the various places where spatial info might be found, and show some blind alleys I've followed. Examples are from a project that uses Wikipedia to enhance a map-based iOS app of some US National Park Service data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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24-hr Latency End to End Data Processing Using Open Source Technologies for the Airborne Snow Observatory

JPL's Airborne Snow Observatory is an integrated imaging spectrometer and scanning LIDAR for measuring mountain snow albedo, snow depth/snow water equivalent, and ice height (once exposed), led by PI Dr. Tom Painter. The team recently wrapped our second "Snow On" campaign where over a course of 3 months, we flew the Tuolumne River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California above the O'Shaughnessy Dam of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir; focusing initial on the Tuolumne, and then moving to weekly flights over the Uncompahgre Basin, Colorado.To meet the needs of its customers including Water Resource managers who are keenly interested in Snow melt, the ASO team had to develop and end to end 24 hour latency capability for processing spectrometer and LIDAR data from Level 0 to Level 4 products. Fondly referring to these processing campaigns as "rodeos" the team rapidly constructed a Big Data open source data processing system at minimal cost and risk that not only met our processing demands, but taught the entire team many lessons about remote sensing of snow and dust properties, algorithm integration, the relationship between computer scientists, and snow hydrologist; flight and engineering teams, geographers, and most importantly lessons about camaraderie that will engender highly innovative and rapid data systems development, and quality science products for years to come.Chris Mattmann, Paul Ramirez, and Cameron Goodale for the ASO project will present this talk and will detail the story of the Compute processing capability on behalf of the larger team, highlighting contributions of its key members along the way. We will cover the blending of open source technologies and proprietary software packages that have helped us attain our goals and discuss areas that we are actively investigating to expand our use of open source.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Creating Custom HTML Elements for Maps

Maps appear all over the web but the core structural language of the web—HTML—does not natively support them. Adding dynamic or interactive maps to a web page or web application can involve complex JavaScript code that is difficult to reuse between contexts.Web developers are starting to have opportunities to change this. Some newer web development frameworks are designed to support HTML page elements with custom attributes as a way of defining behaviors. These frameworks anticipate web components, an emerging standard for creating fully custom HTML tags. Custom attributes and elements make it possible to effectively expand HTML to include `...`.This talk will demonstrate how to use existing JavaScript map libraries to create flexible, reusable maps that take the form of HTML elements with custom attributes. Looking forward, we'll explore how web components let us take this technique even further and create true custom HTML elements for maps and the display of other geo data.Crafting custom HTML map elements doesn't just mean making maps a first-class citizen of web page markup, it offers a whole new way to create and share web-based mapping tools between applications and organizations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Mapossum: A System for Creating, Collecting and Displaying Spatially-Referenced Answers to User-Contributed Questions

This project, originally inspired by the pop vs soda maps (www.popvssoda.com) seeks to create a web application where any question can be asked and answered by anyone with internet access. The Mapossum allows users to visualize spatial patterns in the questions they wish to pose without the need to possess the knowledge necessary to create maps of their own. The application creates a spatial web-survey system that harnesses the visualization power of a web map to explore the spatial components of question. As a tool it has the ability to help users reveal a different dimension of spatial interactions, and provides more insight into cultural and regional interactions. To accomplish this we have created a framework that abstracts the creation of questions and the logging of spatially referenced responses so that the answers can be mapped as points, or aggregated at various levels of administrative or political units (counties, states, countries). The application utilizes PostGIS/PostgreSQL to store and manipulate the data for the questions, responses, and other spatial data needed to support the application. The information is served as Web Mercator tiles using Python and Mapnik. On the front end these tiles and other data are consumed using the Leaflet JavaScript library. Users have the ability to create questions and the possible responses to these questions, as well as query the responses. The presentation will discuss the framework in detail, and we will demonstrate the use of the application for various types of question Ð response collection scenarios. The application has potential to be used as a general data collection tool for those collecting data in the field. We are also seeking to include the ability to couple the process of both answering and visualizing responses with social networking sites. The Mapossum couples a web-survey system with the visualization power of a web map to explore questions that have a spatial component to them as so many questions do.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenDroneMap

Aimed at developers and end-users, this presentation will cover the current state-of-the-art of OpenDroneMap, toolkit of FOSS computer vision tools aiming to be easy to use for referencing unstructured photos into geography data (colorized point clouds, referenced photos, orthophotos, surface models and more), whether the images be sourced from street level photos, building interiors, or from sUASs (drones).Currently no such comprehensive FOSS toolkit exists and is easy to use and install. ODM aims to fill this gap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)