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26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Educating 21st Century Geospatial Technology Industry Workers with Open Source Software

Where are GIS educators to go when they need educational material to teach FOSS4G in their academic programs? While commercial vendors, like Esri through their Virtual Campus, have a wealth of training material available, there are very limited resources for educators seeking to teach FOSS4G. The new QGIS Academy program is the first national effort to provide this much need academic infrastructure. The Academy has produced a set of five full GIS courses, based on the latest version of QGIS, to offer educators and others for free under the Creative Commons CC BY license. These courses have been under development since 2010 and use the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM) as the basis for their scope and sequence. This presentation will demonstrate the courses and discuss their development and future plans.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A FOSS4G-Based Geo Connection System for Education and Research

The presentation will examine the selection, installation, and the current and planned use of a CentOSÐbased system running FOSS4G to support student education, research, and projects with state and local organizations. A system was designed to foster collaborative work between an educational institution and the community. Specifically, it is being used to better understand and enhance distribution systems associated with local agriculture producers and consumers. Part of this work is the development of a web-based system to process and serve geospatial information in an effort to improve communication between food producers and consumers, i.e. restaurants, farmers markets, and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA). This presentation will demonstrate how the system was built to:¥ Continue investigation of the general principles and approaches for designing food distribution systems to enhance local food networks¥ Provide access to a web-based system for geospatial computations and data management¥ Serve as a resource for the community to access information in support of the broader goals of the CEDS research center¥ Act as an map server¥ Act as the server supporting deployment of geo-aware mobile phone applications implemented by the department to enhance the learning process on field trips and other field work¥ Collect, process, store, and serve data from environmental sensors to support education in weather, climate, and the environment
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:16 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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pyModis: from satellite to GIS maps

One year after the first public presentation of pyModis at FOSS4G 2013 a lot of improvements have been implemented in the pyModis library. The most important news are that each command line tool now offers a graphical user interface to assist inexperienced users. Furthermore, the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is not longer mandatory in order to mosaic and reproject the original MODIS data as GDAL is now supported.Hence the most important improvement was the reimplementation of existing MRT component to use the Python binding of GDAL. This was basically driven by the fact that MRT does not properly perform geodetic datum transforms as discovered in the daily work with MODIS data within the PGIS-FEM group leading to shifted reprojection output. With the new GDAL support not only this problem has been solved but also the installation greatly simplified. pyModis is used all over the world in academic, governmental and private companies due to its powerful capabilities while keeping MODIS processing workflows as simple as possible.The presentation will start with a small introduction about pyModis and its components, the library and the tools. This part is followed by news about the latest pyModis release and indications about future developments.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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ZOO-Project 1.4.0: news about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS), it was released under a MIT/X-11 style license and is currently in incubation at OSGeo. It provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easilly create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.4.0 release.A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. Then an overview of the ZOO-Project will serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.4.0 release and highlight their interrests for applications developpers and users. Then, examples of concrete services chain use will illustrate the way ZOO-Project can be used to build complete applications in a flexible way by using the service chain concept, creating new service by implementing intelligent chain of service through ZOO-API but also by taking advantage of the publication using OGC standards. Various use of OSGeo softwares, such as GDAL, GEOS, PostGIS, pgRouting, as WPS services through the ZOO-Project will be illustrated by applications presentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:02:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping for Investigations

Closing Keynote Speech, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
52:28 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Toolmaker’s Guide

Opening Keynote, FOSS4G 2014, Portland, Oregon
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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From Nottingham to PDX: QGIS 2014 roundup

Following the long awaited QGIS 2 release, announced at FOSS4G 2013 in Nottingham, the project decided to switch to a regular release cycle with three versions per year. QGIS 2.2 was the first release in this cycle and already packed with many new features like 1:n relations, gradient fills, native DXF export and NTv2 datum transformations to name a few. QGIS 2.4, released in June, has one major extension in its core: multithreaded rendering. Originally developed as a Google Summer of Code project, it makes a big difference in the responsiveness of QGIS desktop.This talk shows a selection of the latest features and gives an outlook what's in the works for QGIS 2.6. Some interesting plugins and other news from the community will keep you up to date with the high pace of this OSGeo project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GRASS GIS 7: your reliable geospatial number cruncher

GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) looks back to the longest development history in the FOSS4G community. Having been available for 30 years, a lot of innovation has been put into the new GRASS GIS 7 release. After six years of development it offers a lot of new functionality, e.g. enhanced vector network analysis, voxel processing, a completely new engine for massive time series management, an animation tool for raster and vector map time series, a new graphic image classification tool, a "map swiper" for interactive maps comparison, and major improvements for massive data analysis (see also http://grass.osgeo.org/grass7/). The development was driven by the rapidly increasing demand for robust and modern free analysis tools, especially in terms of massive spatial data processing and processing on high-performance computing systems. With respect to GRASS GIS 6.4 more than 10,000 source code changes have since been made.GRASS GIS 7 provides a new powerful Python interface that allows users to easily create new applications that are powerful and efficient. The topological vector library has been improved in terms of accuracy, processing speed, and support for large files. Furthermore, projections of planets other than Earth are now supported as well. Many modules have been significantly optimized in terms of speed even by orders of magnitude. The presentation will showcase the new features along with real-world examples and the integration with QGIS, gvSIG CE, R statistics, and the ZOO WPS engine.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Js.Geo part Deux recap

For those of you sad pandas who couldn't make JS.geo on Tuesday, we will give a quick intro as to why scheduling was so hard this year, a quick tour of some of the amazing demos, highlights of the discussion from the day, and wrap up with what we would like to do to see it go smoother next year. Be there or be square (actually all that would happen is you would miss out on the coolest tech demo'ed at FOSS4G)!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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PostGIS Feature Frenzy

PostGIS has over 300 functions, which in turn can be used with the many features of the underlying PostgreSQL database. This talk covers some basic and not- so- basic ways to use PostGIS/PostgreSQL to process spatial data, to build infrastructures, and to do crazy things with data. Consider the possibilities: raster, topology, linear referencing, history tracking, web services, overlays, unions, joins, constraints, replication, json, xml, and more!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness.Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate fast, appealing, informative and readable maps.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Serving high-resolution sptatiotemporal climate data is hard, let's go shopping

The world is a big place and time is infinite. Scientists who study any aspect of the Earth's climate are immediately faced with the exponentially growing amount of data that are required to represent properties of the climate in both time and space. The bulk of these data is a substantial barrier to extracting meaningful information from their contents. This barrier can be prohibitive to smaller-scale researchers and communities that want to study and understand the impact of the climate on their localities. Fortunately, a substantial amount of free and open source software (FOSS) exists upon which one can build a great geospatial data application.The Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium (PCIC), a regional climate services provider in British Columbia, Canada, has been making a concerted effort to use geospatial FOSS in order to expand the availability, comprehensibility and transparency of big climate data sets from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiment. With a full stack of geospatial FOSS and open protocols we have built and deployed a web platform capable of visualizing and distributing high-resolution spatiotemporal raster climate data.Our web application consists of:+ back-end storage with raw NetCDF4/HDF5 files+ a PostgreSQL/PostGIS database for indexed metadata+ ncWMS for maps and visualization+ the PyDAP OPeNDAP server for data requests+ a web user interface to tie it all togetherThis presentation will provide a case study for enabling scientific collaboration using FOSS and open standards. We will describe our application architecture, present praise for and critique of the components we used, and provide a detailed discussion of the components that we had to improve or write ourselves. Finally, though our use case is specific to climate model output, we will provide some commentary as to how this use case relates to other applications of spatiotemporal data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
30:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Quadcopter GIS for less than 700 - Hardware and software to map your local community

Quadcopter - Phantom FC40 (500). Camera - Canon PowerShot ELPH 130 IS 16.0 MP (110). Opportunity to engage your local community to produce open data - priceless.Let's get to the point. Let's talk about hardware and software to get out there and actually map some stuff with a quadcopter. This is the story of my adventures hacking with a Phantom quadcopter over the last 10 months to make local maps... and of course have fun. The only rules... it has to be cheap and the software has to be open source.We will go through the hardware, including purchasing, setting up, and flying the quadcopter. The camera is hacked with CHDK and strapped on the quadcopter with some velcro to a vibration dampener cut up with a dremel tool. The processing software is a pain to install, but we will talk through it including software options, how to get your processing off loaded to your video card GPU, and how we as a community can make all this easier in the future. Finally, we will look at what you can actually make... including mosaics, 3d models, and DEM's of your local community.Quadcopters are cheap, fun, and amazing for engaging your local community to produce open data. Let's do it!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoMOOSE at 10 Years

GeoMOOSE released its very first version in 2005. At nearly 10 years old the project has continued to hold on to its original developers and many of its foundation users. Over that lifespan the project has allowed the development team to observe struggles in changing technology, attitudes, and the dedication required to keep such an open source project relevant as it ages.Nearly 10 years worth of dirty laundry will be aired! And a preview of GeoMOOSE 3.0 ideas! And slides with exclamation points!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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UrbanSim2: Simulating the Connected Metropolis

<style type="text/css"><!--td br --></style>UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatial simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.<style type="text/css"><!--td br -->UrbanSim is an open source software platform for agent-based geospatialå simulation, focusing on the spatial dynamics of urban development. å Since its creation UrbanSim has been used in the official planningå processes for at least a dozen regional governments which were usedå to help allocate billions of dollars in regional investments in transportationå infrastructure.UrbanSim was first conceptualized in the late 1990's and implementedå using the Java programming language. The technology landscape forå scientific computing changed dramatically after that, and by 2005å UrbanSim was converted to Python, making heavy use of Numpy to vectorizeå calculations. By 2014, it became clear that UrbanSim should be reimplementedå again to take advantage of significant advances in the libraries availableå for scientific Python. The new version of UrbanSim, called UrbanSim2,å makes extensive use of community-supported scientific Python librarieså to reduce the amount of domain-specific customized code to a minimum.UrbanSim is an excellent case study for the power of leveraging thework of the scientific programming community as scaffolding for adomain-specific application, as opposed to building an extensive customizedå solution in each domain. Additionally, the open and participatoryå nature inherent in nearly all of the open source projects describedå here has been particularly embraced by governments, who are oftenå reticent to support large commercial institutions and balkanized andå private data formats and software tools.--></style>
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
57:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Development and Evolution of an open source mapping application within the USG <- Now with More Google Glass

The United States Government has a history of developing applications using legacy systems and continuing to use brittle software. This approach has managed to minimize data collection, sharing and use of open standards. With this in mind NGA has several groups focused on a rapid, innovative, and open approaches to application development. One of the recent applications developed in this fashion is the Mobile Analytic GEOINT Environment (MAGE), which evolved from earlier applications that were used for Disaster Response as well as various special events. Each of these earlier applications had their own strengths and weaknesses that were factored in during the development of MAGE. MAGE is built on an open source stack with a mobile and html5 application designed for geospatial data collection, imagery sharing, tracking, and communication. It is designed to be a lightweight, fully portable software stack that can be placed in front or behind firewalls with ease. It is fully customizable to a wide variety of mission needs so administrators can easily change the data collection parameters. MAGE is fully service enabled allowing easy access to the data via REST requests and returns multiple formats including GeoJSON, KML, and Shapefile to ensure ease of access and sharing. The app has also been ported to Google Glass for field collection and enhanced visualization.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:43 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tilez: serving seamless polygons in the browser with TopoJSON and Node.js

This talk will introduce the Tilez project, which provides aNode.js-based realisation of a Tile Map Service tiles in both GeoJSON andTopoJSON formats. This formats provide a seamless and highly performant usermapping experience in both OpenLayers and Leaflet.The key to fast display of vector geometries in Tilezz lies in the use oftiles, which leverage both local and server-side caching. Whilst linear features lend themselves easily to tiling, polygons have traditionally represented more of a challenge.Tilez provides further efficiencies by using TopoJSON as a transport formatbetween the server and the client. Tilez implements all these improvements to support web-based vector tiling, delivering good performance under heavy load through Node,js and CouchDB-based caching, and efficient transport through TopoJSON. This talk will cover Tilez and the practical aspects of its implementation together with use cases from the Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN - www.aurin.org.au).
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNode for Humanitarian Crisis and Risk Reduction

GeoNode is a web-based application and platform for developing geospatial information systems (GIS) and for deploying spatial data infrastructures (SDI).The World Bank, the European Commission and the UN World Food Programme are among the major contributors and sustainers of the GeoNode project and they are using it for spatial data sharing and management projects.Being extremely active in the field of Humanitarian Crisis and Risk Reduction they have deployed custom GeoNode instances to support risk reduction and post crisis need assessment.During this talk three customized GeoNode instances will be presented, focusing the attention on their technology, usage for emergency preparedness and response, their federation and the added value provided by Open Source technologies for geospatial data sharing.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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CS-Map - coordinate system libraries

CS-Map is often used as a reference but has not been as widely adopted as proj4. This presentation describes how CS-Map has been used in a distributed geospatial database for big data.The presentation describes the benefits of CS-Map, in particular its whole earth support and also it disadvantages, primarily it is process locked.The aim of the presentation is to demonstrate that having more than one coordinate system library is a good thing and to encourage development of coordinate system libraries.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Building Open Source Projects in Government Esri Ecosystems

The challenges that are most commonly discussed by proponents of open source in government technology relate to changing the culture among technical staff and explaining the value of open tools and systems. But beyond the political concerns and misperceptions, there are practical complications in implementing these tools inside proprietary tech ecosystems like Esri. Although it's becoming easier, injecting open source into the Esri stack can be convoluted, to say the least.For all of its challenges, however, there have been many successful open source implementations in all levels of government, from open data portals to full-scale applications. Using case studies from recent Code for America projects, this talk will identify some of the more difficult challenges and highlight a few techniques for integrating open source geo tools into the Esri stack with a focus on minimizing difficulty for the developer and maximizing benefit for the end user. The talk will focus on web applications and tools while touching on data interoperability, spatial analysis, and trainings/documentation.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
08:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Small town GIS - Leveraging GitHub, QGIS and community members to manage local data

Langley is a small rural community on Whidbey Island in Washington State. Like so many other small rural communities, Langley is faced with limited resources but a great need to better understand the geospatial context of the local environment. Through the use of open source tools, including QGIS, GDAL/OGR, PostGIS, GRASS, and others, as well as free open data hosting at GitHub, Langley has started to better leverage existing data and attract community members to participate in gathering new and useful data. Small scale "civic hacking" is alive and well... and provides opportunities and challenges that are both similar and different than that of the larger urban counterparts engaged in large scale civic hacking.This talk with go over the technical aspects of the workflows that have proven fruitful for engaging local community members of small rural communities in both data creation and curation. We will also look at the social aspects of getting local governments engaged in the process of leveraging community resources for open access to data and tools.https://github.com/langleywa
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Assessing the distribution of disease vectors and fruit crop pests from satellite in GRASS GIS 7

Over the past decades, disease vectors like the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) transmitting Dengue Fever and other infections and the Spotted Wing Drosophila (Drosophila suzukii), an economically important fruit crop pest, have continued to globally expand. In Europe, the already invaded areas comprise the Mediterranean basin while the spread to the north of the Alps is ongoing. Likewise many regions in the world face an increasing risk for new or re-emerging vector-borne diseases transmitted by mosquitoes. Given this spread, there is an urgent need to gain better understanding of spatio-temporal patterns in disease transmission and agro-pest diffusion. The life cycles of mosquitoes and fruit flies depend on climatic and environmental conditions which can be observed using satellite sensors. We identified the potential distribution areas linked to the current climatic suitability through the evaluation of remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST) data for Northern Italy and Switzerland. For this we processed with GRASS GIS 7 more than a decade of daily MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite sensor data at continental scale (250 m resolution, four maps per day) as an alternative to meteorological data. Since LST data often contain gaps due to cloud cover, these gaps were filled by reconstructing any missing LST values before environmental indicators have been derived from these data. From the gap-filled LST data (in the multi terabyte range) we derived threshold maps like January mean temperatures as a threshold to estimate the survival chances of overwintering diapausing eggs, whereas the annual mean temperature can be used as a threshold to estimate population stability. We derived growing degree days (GDD) as well by temporal aggregation. The approach can be applied to continents other than Europe, too. The resulting potential distribution maps can be leveraged to assess the spread of disease vectors and agro-pests in order to assist decision makers and public health authorities to develop surveillance plans and vector control.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Adopting OGC Standards in a Flood Alert System

This presentation is about the adoption of the OGC - Open Geospatial Consortium standards in Sao Paulo Flood Alert System which was based on matrix coordinates and static maps.The Flood Alert System has more than 300 telemetric stations composed by rain gauges, water level sensors placed on rivers and reservoirs, water quality sensors, weather stations and a S-band weather radar reaching 240 kilometers of scanning range. The system offers Real Time support for a large metropolitan area and its Emergency Centers, Civil Defense groups, Government, Service companies and general public.We have integrated Geotools (for data conversion), Geoserver (services like WMS, WFS), DB2, OpenStreetMap, uDig, Quantum GIS and some other softwares in our architecture. This set of tools provides many possibilities to easily integrate our data with other systems and external data, like some Hydraulic and Hydrological models that return geospacial data with flooding area forecast and vulnerable buildings.Talking about the architecture, the adoption process, some of the issues, apllied solutions and further development.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Crazy data: Using PostGIS to fix errors and handle difficult datasets

Inteligeo is a system that stores a lot of information used by the Brazilian Federal Police Forensics to fight crime, initially in the environmental arena with a later expansion to other types of crime. During the construction of the database a lot of problems appeared for which PostGIS was the key to the solution.This presentation describes problems encountered by the team while loading 850+ shapefiles into the database, linking with external databases and building 950+ views of the data.Although the content of the recipes is very technical, the general concepts will be explained in an accessible language and correlated to real world cases.Topics:*Definition of crazy data in our context*Quick recipes- Spike removal- Invalid geometry detection and fixing- Filling holes- Raster image footprints- Hammering data into correct topologies- Speeding data visualization with ST Simplify and PGSQL 9.3's materialized views- Rough georeferencing using an auxiliary table- Creating constraints*How is crazy data generated and our experience in handling each case- Large datasets- Lack of validation- Reprojection- Geometric operations- Topological errors- Imprecise definitions- Legacy databases- Bad georeferencingWe will also discuss why is handling crazy data important for the Brazilian Federal Police, our efforts in cleaning up data at the source and the implications of geographical data in general for fighting crime.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoScript - A Geospatial Swiss Army Knife

GeoScript adds spatial capabilities to dynamic scripting languages that run on the JVM. With implementations in Python, JavaScript, Scala, and Groovy, GeoScript provides an interface to the powerful data access, processing and rendering functionality of the GeoTools library.GeoScript provides concise and simple apis that allow developers to perform tasks quickly making it a great tool for the day to day data juggling that comes with geopspatial data. This talk will focus mainly on real world examples that showcase the power of the library.Come check this talk out if you are interested in learning about a new tool to add to your geospatial hacking toolbox. Maybe you have tried to use GeoTools but find it too difficult and complex to use. Or perhaps your java skills are not where you would like them to be. If that is the case this talk, and GeoScript, might be just what you are looking for.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Choose your own Adventure - Open Source Spatial on OpenShift

Learn how to build quick and easy open source mapping solutions using several different languages and datastores. Well start by selecting our source data, and a database to house it. Then, we'll pick language and a simple microframework to power a basic REST API. Finally, we add Leaflet Maps for user-facing data visualization and controls. Feel free to bring a laptop and follow along to launch your very own mapping application during this short talk.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:03 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapServer Project Update - Introducing Version 7.0

This session will begin with a status update for the MapServer project - current and future directions. Focus will then shift to the main features and enhancements coming in MapServer 7.0 including dynamic heatmaps, WFS 2.0 support, UTFGrid generation and more. Finally we'll finish with a discussion of contribution opportunities for interested developers and users.This a great opportunity to chat with the members of the MapServer project team!
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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3D-printing with GRASS GIS Ð a work in progress in report

As the amount of scientific data continues to grow, researchers need new tools to help them visualize complex data. Immersive data-visualisations are helpful, yet fail to provide tactile feedback and sensory feedback on spatial orientation, as provided from tangible objects. The production of a tangible representation of a scientific data set is one step in a line of scientific thinking, leading from the physical world into scientific reasoning and back: The process starts with a physical observation, or from a data stream generated by an environmental sensor. This data stream is turned into a geo-referenced data set. This data is turned into a volume representation which is converted into command sequences for the printing device, leading to the creation of a 3D printout via additive manufacturing ("3D-printing"). As a last, but crucial step, this new object has to be documented and linked to the associated metadata, and curated in long term repositories to preserve its scientific meaning and context.This presentation showcases a reference workflow to produce tangible 3D data-prints based on Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), using both GRASS GIS and Paraview. The workflow was successfully validated in various application scenarios using a RapMan printer to create 3D specimens of elevation models, geological underground models, ice penetrating radar soundings for planetology, and space time stacks for Tsunami model quality assessment.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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OpenDroneMap

Aimed at developers and end-users, this presentation will cover the current state-of-the-art of OpenDroneMap, toolkit of FOSS computer vision tools aiming to be easy to use for referencing unstructured photos into geography data (colorized point clouds, referenced photos, orthophotos, surface models and more), whether the images be sourced from street level photos, building interiors, or from sUASs (drones).Currently no such comprehensive FOSS toolkit exists and is easy to use and install. ODM aims to fill this gap.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The unrelenting progress of design in open source

Open source geospatial is in an Enlightenment era regarding design; many teams are breaking away from tradition and embracing simple, clean, and usable interfaces. For a long time though, open source geospatial software, and geospatial software in general, seemed to pay little attention to the knowledge of the design community. Here, I will discuss why design has taken a backseat for such a long history and what is suddenly changing that brings it to the forefront. I will also talk some about the design decisions that have gone into the CartoDB user interface and many of the mapping options we help our users find. This talk will focus both on the history of design in open source geospatial software and where it is heading in the future. We will also talk about how design itself is inherently open and how we are working to improve open source software design through our own contributions and through this discussion of our process.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
35:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Spatial-Temporal Prediction of Climate Change Impacts using pyimpute, scikit-learn and GDAL

As the field of climate modeling continues to mature, we must anticipate the practical implications of the climatic shifts predicted by these models. In this talk, I'll show how we apply the results of climate change models to predict shifts in agricultural zones across the western US. I will outline the use of the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Scikit-Learn (sklearn) to perform supervised classification, training the model using current climatic conditions and predicting the zones as spatially-explicit raster surfaces across a range of future climate scenarios. Finally, I'll present a python module (pyimpute) which provides an API to optimize and streamline the process of spatial classification and regression problems.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
33:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mapping Words and Phrases from Geographic Knowledge on the Web

Extremely rich and diverse knowledge about places across the world is available online in a variety of forms, including structured data, image, and natural language description. Map-based exploration of this knowledge has potential to aid a number of applications from education to marketing. In this presentation we describe a system to map geographic regions associated with arbitrary keywords, phrases, and texts by computing topic surfaces over the Earth from unstructured natural language text. Our methodology combines natural language processing and geostatistics and is built using freely available open source tools. We train our system on Wikipedia and travel blog entries and demonstrate it with a general-purpose geographic knowledge exploration tool.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)