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26:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Integrating FOSS4G into an enterprise system for Disaster Management

ROGUE (Rapid Open Geospatial User-Driven Enterprise) was a project funded under the Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Program from the U.S. Department of Defense. Boundless and LMN Solutions, LLC implemented the project, with the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) serving in the role of project Transition Manager. The project's goal was to improve the abilities of the OpenGeo Suite to ingest, update, and distribute non-proprietary feature data in a distributed, collaborative, and occasionally disconnected environment. Under this project, PDC integrated the following technologies into its decision support system for emergency managers named DisasterAWARE:- GeoGit: Versioned replication of spatial data across multiple sites, supports disconnected editing and conflict resolution. - Arbiter: Android app for field data collection, syncs to GeoNode.- MapLoom: GeoNode GUI for spatial data editing and management. - KML Uploader: Functionality to upload KML for storage in PostGIS and served via GeoServer. - GeoServices REST (GSR): Extends GeoServer to publish data using the REST methodology of ArcGIS Server. This presentation will cover the integration of these components into DisasterAWARE, along with the security framework implemented for all components.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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What's new in Cesium: the open-source alternative for 3D maps

When building 3D mapping apps, we no longer have to deal with closed feature-sets, limited programming models, temporal data challenges and bulky deployments. This talk introduces Cesium, a WebGL-based JavaScript library designed for easy development of lightweight web mapping apps. With live demos, we will show Cesium's major geospatial features including high-resolution global-scale terrain, map layers and vector data; support for open standards such as WMS, TMS and GeoJSON; smooth 3D camera control; and the use of time as a first-class citizen. We will show how Cesium easily deploys to a web browser without a plugin and on Android mobile devices.Since last year's talk at FOSS4G NA, Cesium has added 3D models using the open-standard glTF, a large geometry library and higher-resolution terrain.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS goes 3D : an OpenSource stack

3D in GIS is already here, with more and more data available, and new hardware and sensors for 3D data capture and interaction. The third dimension becomes useful for several use cases and applications, since the technology is now available to achieve full 3D spatial analysis, like 3D intersections, 3D buffers, triangulation and a lot of other data processing capabilities we already use with 2D data. 3D Point clouds from Lidar data, 3D Meshes or TIN, this can now be stored and processed.With 3D data, an absolute must-have is a nice, fast and smooth rendering of features. Visualization is a key element of a complete vertical software stack of 3D data management.This presentation will demonstrate the ability to setup and take advantage of a full FOSS4G 3D stack.Taking data from 3D sensors, or real use-case GIS Open Data, we present the components which can be used together to build the core infrastructure of 3D data management. From data storage to data visualization, through processing and webservices.* Learn how you can use PostgreSQL and PostGIS latest enhancement to store and process 3D data.* Discover how you can setup 3D Web Services for data dissemination* Visualize 3D data with QGIS thanks to the Horao Plugin* Find out the visualization tools available for your favorite browser (Three.js powered)Here we are, a full 3D stack, with OpenSource tools. Software components, data formats, protocols and standards, you will get a global picture of the infrastructure available to extract the value out of your 3D data.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Exposing NASA's Earth Observations

The satellites which comprise NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) have a long history of capturing rich datasets with global coverage over extended periods of time. While the data itself is rich (and open!), it can be a daunting task for uninitiated users to find suitable datasets, learn the data format, and subsequently find interesting phenomena. Even for those who are familiar with the data, it can be a time consuming process. But thanks to the proliferation and maturity of open source geospatial software, NASA has been able to build an imagery ingest pipeline, open source tiled imagery server, and open source, web-based mapping client to encourage exploration and discovery of NASA datasets. This talk will describe how NASA is building these capabilities through the Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) and Worldview client, demonstrate how others are building upon them, and show what it takes to integrate NASA imagery into clients using the GIBS API.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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How Simplicity Will Save GIS

It's 2014 — we have consumer robots and electric cars, private spacecraft, planet colonization projects, and the Higgs Boson is confirmed, but GIS software is still a mess. You might be able to make sense of it all if you're a GIS specialist with an academic background, but other creative individuals — designers, developers, tinkerers of all kinds, each with a vision and desire to create meaningful and beautiful maps and visualizations — are constantly losing battles against bloat, clutter, and complexity.How do we reverse this GIS entropy? What does it take to turn complex technology into something that anyone can use and contribute to? An attempt to answer by the creator of Leaflet, a simple JS library that changed the world of online maps forever. 
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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The Manager's Guide to PostGIS

Your staff keep talking about this "PostGIS" thing, but what is it? Does anyone (important) else use it? What for?This talk gives a brief overview of the place of PostGIS in spatial IT architecture, how PostGIS compares to proprietary alternatives, who is using PostGIS, and how organizations transition to open source databases.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Running Your Own Rendering Infrastructure

In addition to hosting the popular OSM-base Toner, Watercolor, and Terrain tile sets, Stamen incorporates custom cartography into much of our client work. This is a behind-the-scenes walkthrough covering the evolution of our rendering infrastructure and the peripheral services that help to make our work unique. Topics covered include the image processing used for Watercolor and Map Stack, raster manipulation for Terrain, Surging Seas, and the Chesapeake Bay Program, as well as the use of vector tiles (for both OSM and other data) to support Pinterest and future work.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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An Automated, Open Source Pipeline for Mass Production of 2 m/px DEMs from Commercial Stereo Imagery

We have adapted the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) - a suite of automated, open source, command-line photogrammetry tools originally developed for NASA planetary missions - to process high-resolution stereo satellite imagery of the Earth. These tools are multithreaded, memory efficient and scalable, which enables processing of "big image data" (e.g., 16-bit panchromatic WorldView images with dimensions ~36000 x 460000 px). We have deployed this pipeline on the NASA Pleiades supercomputer to generate ~2 m/px digital elevation models (DEMs) and ~0.5 m/px orthoimages for thousands of WorldView-1/2 along-track stereopairs. New ASP tools mitigate systematic DEM artifacts and allow for automated, a posteriori DEM coregistration using iterative closest point algorithms. When existing control data are available (e.g. LiDAR, GPS), automated alignment routines offer sub-meter horizontal and vertical DEM accuracy.Our research applications focus on ice sheet dynamics in Greenland/Antarctica and ice/snow evolution in the Pacific Northwest. We have developed an additional collection of tools for DEM analysis, including utilities to produce maps of 3D surface displacement (velocity) vectors and eulerian/lagrangian elevation change. We present the following case studies to highlight the capabilities of these data and our open source workflow:-A 57+ DEM timeseries from 2008-2013 for Greenland's most dynamic outlet glacier, revealing >40 m/yr interannual thinning and large seasonal variability-Annual DEM mosaics that reveal the ongoing evolution of West Antarctica's "weak underbelly", an area roughly the size of New Mexico-Repeat DEM timeseries for Mt. St. Helen's showing volcanic dome growth, glacier advance, canopy height, fluvial erosion/deposition, and landslides.For many applications, DEMs derived from high-resolution satellite imagery are comparable to those derived from airborne LiDAR data, with the advantage of global, on-demand tasking capabilities and reduced costs. Archived commercial stereo imagery is available at no cost to federal employees or federally-funded researchers, and the tools/methods highlighted here offer an automated, open source alternative to traditional, GUI-based, commercial photogrammetry software packages. https://github.com/NeoGeographyToolkit/StereoPipeline
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Fast Travel Sheds using GTFS Data in GeoTrellis Transit

General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data is the open standard for representing transit systems in space and time. While developing an open source planning application for public transit agencies, it became clear that processing speed was the primary impediment to calculating transit coverage indicators within a reasonable time. At a glance, GTFS is just a set of simple CSV files organized relationally with key fields. But transit systems are far more complex than just spatial data for routes and stops. They need to be able to model spatial-temporal relationships embodied in transit schedules as well as semi-cyclical and shifting schedule patterns. Additionally, the specification is flexible enough to represent many different approaches to operating transit systems and the same system attributes can often be represented in multiple ways.While some transit system metrics are fairly straightforward to compute, certain public transit system metrics are best modeled as "travel shed" represented by raster coverages or isolines derived from them. The GeoTrellis Transit project is an extension of the open source GeoTrellis framework and was created to calculate travel shed rasters using GTFS and OpenStreetMap data. GeoTrellis Transit accomplishes this by creating a time-dependant graph structure that can rapidly perform shortest path queries at a given time of day, based on the public transit schedule.The challenge in developing GeoTrellis Transit involved designing a time-dependent graph structure that contains information about how the nodes connect at any particular moment in time during traversal. Shortest path algorithms on time-dependant graphs need to take into account arrival times at any given node, as well as wait times until an edge becomes available. This makes fast calculation of shortest path trees on time-dependant graphs difficult, which GeoTrellis Transit optimizes using a novel data structure to represent the graph.This presentation will introduce the GTFS standard and identify where difficulties may arise, especially for large systems. It will also describe how GTFS, OpenStreetMap and GeoTrellis Transit can be combined to build a fast time-dependant graph structure that can then be used to create time-based shortest path trees and travel shed rasters.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GeoNetwork opensource 3.0

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. GeoNetwork opensource 3.0 comes with a new, clean user interface based on AngularJS, Bootstrap and D3. Other topics presented are related to performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will also be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals as well as work for Environment Canada and the collaboration with the OpenGeoPortal project.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Client-side versus server-side geoprocessing: Benchmarking the performance of web browsers processing geospatial data using common GIS operations.

Are web browsers ready to handle a larger portion of the processing load in our GIS applications? Web-based GIS and mapping applications are traditionally based on a client-server model, where most of the data processing work is placed on the server. This study examines what happens when that processing load is shifted to the client, using JavaScript to process geospatial data with GIS operations directly in the browser.The time needed to complete common GIS tasks using the JavaScript library JSTS Topology Suite were benchmarked in popular web browsers including Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari. The GIS operations buffer, union, and Voronoi diagram were tested with a suite of points, lines, and polygons ranging in size from 10 up to 100,000 vertices. The testing platforms included Windows, Mac, and Linux desktops and laptops.The same geoprocessing tests were conducted on a cloud-based Linux server using the Java library JTS Topology Suite as a performance comparison of server-side processing applications. The various testing configurations were then analyzed to see how browsers stack up to the performance of traditional client-server applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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A jumpstart for your mobile map app

Would you like to get started programming mobile mapping applications? There's a lot to keep in mind: a responsive layout, a mapping framework, positioning of controls and buttons, offline caching of tiles, and finally compiling it all into a mobile app.This presentation walks you through some problems and solutions, culminating in MobileMapStarter. Techniques discussed include jQuery Mobile, Leaflet, and PhoneGap/Cordova.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Getting Started with OpenLayers 3

OpenLayers 3 is here! Now it's time to dive in and get mapping. Join us for an overview of OL3 from a user's perspective. We'll cover common use cases and cool features of the library you might not have heard about. Our goal in this presentation is to get you comfortable with the OpenLayers 3 style of mapping - providing an introduction to raster and vector basics, discussing tips for integration with other JavaScript libraries, and exposing you to the build tools so you can choose just the functionality you need for your mapping application.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Empowering people, popularizing open source, and building a business

Vizzuality went from a data communications consulting company to the creator of one of today's most popular online mapping frameworks, CartoDB. Four years ago, we recognized a major problem in open source geospatial tools, they were still prohibitively difficult to use to creating dynamic, interactive, and beautiful online maps. That was when we decided to build CartoDB, a mix of existing open source software such as PostGIS and our own new code. Each account on CartoDB represents a new PostGIS enabled database, a new user of libraries such as Leaflet, and we hope, a long-time supporter of open source. In this talk, I'll present on how we are building a new and quickly growing community around open source geospatial. I'll talk about our plans for the future and how we plan to support open source for many years to come.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Mobile vector map rendering with Mapbox tools

Rendering maps from vector data is the next wave in custom cartography, and nowhere is this more important than on mobile devices. Modern mobile devices have high-powered GPUs for hardware-accelerated rendering and a multitude of sensors for environmental input, but also need to be keenly aware of network bandwidth constraints and have the ability to go offline. Mapbox is working on a new suite of mobile tools that render constantly up-to-date vector OpenStreetMap data into maps on the device. These maps can be customized completely client-side and even tap into ambient sensors such as GPS, compass, and pedometer. This session will show what's possible with this new open source toolkit, including client-side map style customization and influencing the user experience with sensor inputs, and will talk about high-level design goals of the tools and where they are headed next.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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GIS in Node.js

An overview or GIS tools in server side JavaScript covering turf, proj4js, topojson, mbtiles and integration with Node.js idea like streams.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tileserver on a diet using node.js

Imagine you were to present large amounts of constantly changing, live data to the users on a web map. Imagine it was on a website with high traffic volume(83 millon page views per month) and high requirement on quick response time. What software would you use to solve this challenge?This presentation will cover the journey that Hemnet, a leading real estate property portal in Sweden, took while remaking a vital part of the website. A journey, during which a number of existing map servers, such as Geoserver, were put on test, but were not fast and flexible enough. A journey, that ended with creating a custom tileserver with technologies like Mapnik to make it as fast and efficient as possible. During the presentation we will cover the challenges we had and how we faced them with different technologies available. We'll take a look at how we did performance tests and how we rolled everything out to the masses.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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MapCache: Overview of MapServer's tile caching server

MapCache is the MapServer project's implementation of a tile caching server. It aims to be simple to install and configure, to be (very) fast (written in C and running as a native module under apache or nginx, or as a standalone fastcgi instance), and to be capable (services WMTS, googlemaps, virtualearth, KML, TMS, WMS). When acting as a WMS server, it will also respond to untiled GetMap requests, by dynamically merging multiple layers into a single image, and multiple tiles into an arbitrary image size. Multiple cache backends are included, allowing tiles to be stored and retrieved from file based databases (sqlite, mbtiles, berkeley-db), memcached instances, cloud REST containers (S3, Azure, Google Cloud Storage), or even directly from tiled TIFF files. Support of dimensions allows storing multiple versions of a tileset (e.g. one per customer), and time based requests can be dynamically served by interpreting and reassembling entries matching the requested time interval. MapCache can also be used to transparently speedup existing WMS instances, by intercepting getmap requests that can be served by tiles, and proxying all other requests to the original WMS server. Along with an overview of MapCache's functionalities, this presentation will also address real-world usecases and recommended configurations.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Open Source Social Media Aggregation and Geolocating for Emergency Management

This paper is a case study of FirstToSee, the social media situational awareness project organized by agencies in the Puget Sound region of the Pacific Northwest.The purpose of FirstToSee is to capture, analyze and map social media using open source tools. The desired result is improved situation awareness through a clearer operational picture which in turn assists in providing a more targeted response.The Puget Sound is an actively seismic region and is prone to massive earthquakes, such as the 1700 magnitude 9 Cascadia earthquake. The next such earthquake in the region will cause widespread casualties and damage. Inevitably, when the ÔBig One' hits the public will turn to social media to report what is happening in their area. The collective information has the capacity to assist in assessment of problems and direct resources where needed most.The project stack includes SwiftRiver, PHP, D3JS, GeoJSON, OpenLayers and GeoServer as well as complementary iOS and Android mobile applications that allow trusted sources to report additional critical information during an incident.The open nature of social media provided numerous opportunities to test the platform. Since deploying in May of 2013 we tracked Twitter activity at major Puget Sound festivals and gatherings and real-world incidents around the globe. The first regional disaster since launching came in late March of 2014 during the Washington State Oso landslide. The paper continues with analysis of the keywords searched, content gathered and methods for geolocating, aggregating and disseminating the information to emergency responders at the scene.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Creating Charts and Legends for 3D Atlas Maps - A Mashup of D3.js, osgEarth, and the Chromium Embedded Framework

This presentation introduces a mashup of the JavaScript library D3.js, the virtual globe toolkit osgEarth, and the web browser engine Chromium Embedded Framework. Using the example of a national atlas, it is demonstrated how these OpenSource frameworks facilitate the creation of charts and legends for a series of three-dimensional maps.First, it is explained how a map in osgEarth can be styled with D3 scale functions. Legends for choropleth, line, symbol, and grid maps are derived therefrom. They allow to depict unique values, value ranges, and combinations of those having two dependent variables. Also legend templates for color gradients and hierarchical categories have been developed. All legends are superimposed the virtual globe by means of the Chromium Embedded Framework.Next, six widely used chart types - i.e. pie, ring, wing, divided area, bar, and divergent bar charts - with individual properties are presented. Charts are defined with aforementioned styling functions, created with D3.js, and displayed as billboards in the virtual globe.Finally, a live demo is shown, current limitations are discussed and future work of the atlas project is outlined.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Tracking Slippy Map Analytics

Google Analytics is a great tool for monitoring and reporting on website traffic and user interactions but what it doesn't tell you is that 75% of the time your user's zoom in two levels every time they start to use your map or that external soils layer you added is taking an average three seconds to load. Client side map monitoring adds the missing chapters needed to complete your geo-analytics storybook.We'll briefly walk-through how to setup your slippy map to start tracking analytics, what can be tracked, and what can be discovered.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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TeachOSM

For the past three years Nuala Cowan & Richard Hinton of the Geography department at the George Washington University have integrated the open source mapping platform, OpenStreetMap into the curriculum for their introductory undergraduate Geographical Information Systems (GIS) & Cartography classes; traditionally the domain of desktop, proprietary software. Professors Cowan and Hinton have sought to expand the traditional curriculum, and expose students to various different open source software's, web based platforms, and data collection initiatives, specifically in a service-learning environment.In collaboration with both local & international partners (American Red Cross 2012, USAID 2014), GW Geography students have used high-resolution satellite imagery to trace road and building infrastructure (Columbia & Indonesia 2012, Kathmandu 2013, Philippines & Zimbabwe 2014), data that is subsequently used to support disaster preparedness efforts.Initiated by a small innovative teaching grant we have started work with OpenStreetMap foundation to develop a web site that would allow other instructors to replicate our mapping assignment specific to their particular discipline and curricular needs. This site is called TeachOSM.org. Our funding has since been matched by the World Bank, USAID (OTI and The Geocenter), the State Department and The American Red Cross. With this funding the scope of the project has been expanded to include the redevelopment of the OSM Tasking manager. The OSM Tasking Manager is a custom-mapping tool that facilitates collaborative mapping projects with a humanitarian focus. The purpose of the tool is to divide a mapping job into individual smaller tasks for group work, while guaranteeing coverage and minimizing overlap. New additions to the Tasking Manager will allow instructors to assign cells to individual students for both data creation, and data validation roles.Mapping has applicability across many fields and communities of interest, and can used to document, archive, plan and contribute to both local and international initiatives.Open source mapping modules and assignments are also a unique way to integrate service-learning strategies in course curriculum, while exposing students to new and exciting technological platforms. The experience teaches civic responsibility and the value of collaborative efforts in the global community.The collaborative mapping initiatives at GWU Geography have been exclusively disaster related to date, as this coincides with the research interests of the faculty involved. We believe this instructional module/assignment is applicable to many disciplines and teaching scenarios, and the objective of the TeachOSM platform is to open that possibility to these other fields, in a comprehensive user friendly way.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Server-Side Marker Clustering For Rapid Display of Large Datasets

What happens when you try to give map users a rich display with thousands of points in a web browser? Generally, one of two things occurs. One, the map looks like a carpet of marker symbols. Two, depending on device and bandwidth, a browser-side clustering algorithm can delay the display for an agonizingly long time. The problem is acute in dynamic map systems where automated processes or users generate content because the system architects cannot know in advance how many map entities will be created. Think of mapping tweets, potholes in a major city, or locations of coffee places in Portland Ð map displays have to show dense data effectively. Our presentation shows how a Leaflet plug-in is used on a node.js server to solve this problem. We will demonstrate how the Leaflet.markercluster plug-in is used to generate clusters. Once generated, the clusters are stored in MongoDB and retrieved using a MongoDB geospatial index.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:04 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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Dynamic mapping on the web: building a scalable service for thousands of companies

At CartoDB is an open source stack that includes PostgreSQL, PostGIS, Mapnik and Leaflet. The hosted version enables thousands of users to make new and interesting maps everyday. With some of those users including Al Jazeera America, Twitter, and even online gaming platforms, we aren't scaling for one popular webpage but for thousands of different ones each day. On top of that, maps aren't constrained to a single filter, single style, or to a predefined zoom, CartoDB allows users to access the full power of a dynamic database from the front end. In this talk, I'll present the architecture decisions we have implemented that make it possible to turn PostgreSQL and PostGIS into components of a powerful real-time data visualization tool. These decisions cut straight through the CartoDB software stack, from PostgreSQL and PostGIS through our caching and tile services, and up through to our CartoDB.js library. We'll talk about our on-demand tiling service, our caching strategy, and our implementation of the novel data format for Torque. Each of these areas has enabled our users to make user of entirely open source tools to create maps and services that scale, remain fast, and are beautiful.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2014
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State of the (Geo) Gem

According to its creator, Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto, "Ruby is designed to make programmers happy." While it may not achieve this goal for everyone, it works for at least one programmer (me). When developing spatial applications however, the seeming lack of support for Ruby can serve to diminish programmer happiness. The aim of this presentation is to show that Ruby, with the right gems, and an occasional bit of JRuby sprinkled on top, can make spatial programmers truly happy.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)