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03:40 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2012

Experiencing Military Places

Carson Fellow Marianna Dudley focuses on militarized landscapes and researching a methodology of walking. There are different methods of walking in the environment, according to where one is doing so. Therefore, walking can be considered as “not only a source for creativity, but a way of observing the world around us.” We will walk differently on a military base, which is usually a very restricted environment, than we would somewhere else—and a historian will walk differently again. According to Dudley, “those experiences can’t be made through reading documentary sources, observing maps, or using traditional kinds of archival material.” Dr. Dudley is based at Bristol University in the UK.
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:35 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2012

The Culture of Catastrophe

Carson Fellow Sherry Johnson specializes in Latin American and environmental history and the history of disasters. She examines the culture that develops after a disaster has hit a society. One of her findings is that “disasters will make boundaries go away, will make social boundaries change.” Someone of lower status, for example, can rise to a higher status in a disaster circumstance when he or she behaves in a certain way and becomes a hero. In a community with mixed ethnicities the status based on ethnicity disappears. This also applies to the authorities, who can come out of a catastrophe as cowards who are frowned upon, or who can come out of it as heroes who will be remembered in poems and songs. When it comes to creating heroes, “disasters can have actual positive aspects.” Prof. Dr. Johnson is Director of Academic Programs for the Latin American and Caribbean Center at Florida International University in Miami.
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:52 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2012

Religion and Climatic Change

Carson Fellow Sigurd Bergmann’s research topic is sacred geography, which will form the basis for a larger project on religion and climate change.” He focuses on how religion and climatic change relate to one another. As environmental challenges become greater and the discourse about climate change becomes more and more important, it is crucial to understand that religious world views and values must be included in every kind of cultural analysis. Prof. Dr. Bergmann teaches religious studies at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway.
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:12 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

The Sustainable Food Movement

Carson Fellow Daniel Philippon is interested in food as a transformative aspect of environmentalism. He argues that today, together with climate change, food is what connects people the most with the “sustainability movement.” The name of his project is “Ideal Meals” and he discusses issues such as ethics of sustainable food movements, animal welfare and global/local food systems. Prof. Dr. Philippon is an associate professor of English at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where he teaches courses in the environmental humanities, literary nonfiction writing, and sustainability studies.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
05:39 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2010

Manifest Disaster: Climate and the Making of America

According to Carson Fellow Lawrence Culver, climate played a key role in shaping the settlement and development of the West in the United States. By using historical sources, including government land surveys and travel accounts from settlers, Culver demonstrates the important role that climate played for both survival and profit in the westward expansion process. Prof. Dr. Culver is an associate professor in the Department of History at Utah State University, where his areas of research and teaching include the cultural, environmental, and urban history of the USA.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:29 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2012

Museums, Education, and Climate Change

Carson Fellow Fiona Cameron concentrates on examining society and its relationship with nature—a concept that developed during the Enlightenment. In this context, she asks the question of how we are going to manage climate change. One possibility is to put a focus on museums and regard them as institutions “for disciplining populations.” In the nineteenth century, museums were about education, pedagogy, and instilling morality into the population; according to Cameron they still are seen as places to reform citizens to a certain extent by providing them with critical information and the opportunity “to present some other different types of views of the relationship between humans and nature as an entangled dynamical force.” Prof. Dr. Cameron is a senior research fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Sydney, Australia.
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:30 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Rachel Carson Center Image Film

Visit the RCC virtually! Shot in Munich, this film outlines the goals of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society, highlights the research of the international Carson Fellows, profiles different types of events, and introduces the Center’s digital Environment & Society Portal.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
02:17 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

The Origin of the Term "Recycling"

Science as a practical activity in history, and recycling-related practices in particular, is an important topic in the research of Carson Fellow Simon Werrett. In this work Simon Werrett is interested on the evolution of the term “recycling” and its adaptation within the scientific community. He explores the reception of the term by the engineering community in the 1920s and the adoption of it by the environmentalists in the “green discourse” in the 1960s. Prof. Dr. Werrett is a historian of science at the University of Washington. He is interested in the long-term historical relationships of the arts and sciences, in particular the ways domestic, artisanal, and industrial skills, techniques, and performances have shaped the development of the sciences.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
05:45 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2010

Hard Asphalt and Heavy Metals: An Environmental History of the Urban Crisis

Carson Fellow Robert Gioielli highlights how residents of urban centers in the United States dealt with increasing environmental problems in the 1960s and 1970s. He focuses on three case studies—St. Louis, Chicago, and Baltimore—in order to determine how urban renewal plans and highway development shaped the lives and environmental understanding of the residents, who were often minorities. Prof. Dr. Gioielli is a historian of the modern United States with a specific interest in how the perception and experience of the urban environment has shaped social movements, politics, and policy.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
02:56 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Natural Catastrophes

Carson fellow Istvan Praet studies the cultural perception of natural disasters, based on his dissertation about those perceptions within Chachi indigenous groups located in the region of Esmeraldas, Ecuador. He realized that earthquakes, floods, and other disasters were a common topic in the indigenous conversations, inspiring him to study anthropological conception of catastrophes. Praet is now extending the project to include a comparison of indigenous and scientific notions of disaster. Dr. Praet is a lecturer in anthropology at Roehampton University in London.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:00 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2010

Transforming Socialist Landscape

The transition from socialism to post-socialism has affected many aspects of life in Eastern Europe. By using anthropological participant-observer methodologies, Carson Fellow Stefan Dorondel looks at how this shift impacted land use in these regions. He considers both how people change in relation to the landscape and vice versa. Dr. Dorondel is an anthropologist interested in post-socialist land tenure systems and in land use change.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:30 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Neurohistory

The intersection between neuroscience and history frames Carson Fellow Edmund P. Russell’s research project. Russell looks at the role of functional magnetic resonance imagining (FMRI) in historical research, especially with regard to its effect on human understanding of different types of environments. Prof. Dr. Russell is an associate professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society and the Department of History at the University of Virginia. His research focuses on environmental history and the history of technology.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:38 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

An Environmental History of Hungary

Carson Fellow Lajos Rácz explains the importance of climate history for the overall history of early modern Hungary. Documented climate data has only been in existence since the nineteenth century; therefore, Rácz reconstructs the pre-nineteenth-century Hungarian climate from primary sources like diaries and letters. He uses such historical climate data in order to analyze how climate impacted everyday life during this era. Prof. Dr. Rácz is a professor at Szeged University and a visiting professor at Central European University, Budapest. He has specialized in climate and environmental history research since 1985.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:22 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

The Destruction of the Bison

Inspired by Carson fellow Andrew C. Isenberg and his book The Destruction of the Bison, McNeill follows the track of the global effects of the Industrial Revolution, examining the ecological impact of the industrialization due to “casual demands” that required extracting vast resources from far flung regions in short periods of time, with tremendous environmental consequences. Since 1985, Prof. Dr. McNeill has taught at Georgetown University, where he held the Cinco Hermanos Chair in Environmental and International Affairs before becoming a university professor in 2006.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:52 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Facing Limits: Abundance, Scarcity, and the American Way of Life

Carson Fellow Donald Worster argues that the discovery of the “New World” in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was the most important event in modern history. These explorations gave Western society a wealth of natural resources that has never since been duplicated. Based around the controversy of the 1970s global bestseller, Limits to Growth, Worster examines the implications of the discovery of the New World and how society has transformed from one of natural abundance to one that is faced with scarcity. Prof. Dr. Worster is an American environmental historian and the Hall Distinguished Professor of American History at the University of Kansas, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1989.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:09 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

An Environmental History of the Danube

Carson Fellow Martin Schmid discusses his work on writing the first environmental history of the Danube River. Schmid’s research is part of a larger project on the Danube at the Alpen-Adria-University in Vienna. The Danube has been substantially transformed since 1800 and is, according to Schmid, the most important river in Europe. In order to provide a better understanding of both the development and the importance of the Danube, Schmid begins his history in the 1500s. Prof Dr. Schmid is an assistant professor for environmental history and interdisciplinary communications at Alpen-Adria-University Klagenfurt-Graz-Wien in Austria. A historian by profession, Martin is fascinated with environmental history as an interdisciplinary field, crossing the "great divide" between humanities and natural sciences.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:40 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

British Eighteenth-Century Laboring-Class Poets

In a unique approach to exploring transformations in land use, Carson Fellow Anne Milne uses poetry from the laboring class in eighteenth-century Britain to understand different perceptions of nature during this era. These poets were often described as “natural geniuses.” Milne considers how nature figured in the representation of these poets as individuals. Her work also aims to track changes in land use. Anne Milne is an ecocritic who specializes in Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature. Prof. Dr. Milne currently teaches in the Bachelor of Arts and Sciences Program at the University of Guelph, Canada.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:24 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

An Environmental History of the Early Modern Period

Carson Fellow Reinhold Reith is interested in the relationship between people and nature in the pre-modern age. He aims at showing how people influenced nature and how they changed it. Reith found that the concept of “sustainability” has its roots in the pre-modern age, focusing his research mainly in forestry management within Germany. Prof. Dr. Reith teaches economic and social history in the Department of History at Salzburg University.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:16 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Recycling and the History of Science and Technology

Carson Fellow Simon Werrett examines the idea of frugality as a moral value of scientists during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in North America and Britain, exploring “past practices of recycling” (such as preserving, repairing, and reusing materials in the laboratory). The intention of the research is to incorporate those practices from the past into the present: he finds a particular interaction between scientists and the raw materials used to build their instruments considering a new notion of “sustainability in science.” Prof. Dr. Werrett is a historian of science at the University of Washington. He is interested in the long-term historical relationships of the arts and sciences, in particular the ways domestic, artisanal, and industrial skills, techniques, and performances have shaped the development of the sciences.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:54 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Paradigmatic Shifts in Western Europe: The Importance of the New World

Carson Fellow Donald Worster argues that the discovery of the New World dramatically shaped the very idea of freedom; it significantly altered perceptions of nature, economic growth, and concepts of individuality. Prof. Dr. Worster is an American environmental historian and the Hall Distinguished Professor of American History at the University of Kansas, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1989.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:31 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Alpine Nature Conservation and Resource Management

The development of national parks across transnational borders creates new boundaries—and the conflicts which derive from the different claims of various local and national institutions. Carson Fellow Wilko Graf von Hardenberg researches European conservation management and the variety of tensions therein. By examining historical events in park communities and current policy measures, Graf von Hardenberg looks at European conservation measures in the larger context of global park management. Dr. von Hardenberg is currently the digital humanities resource specialist at the Rachel Carson Center.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
05:03 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2010

The Supernatural Arctic

The Arctic as a blank, unexplored region is not a new concept. Carson Fellow Shane McCorristine investigates Victorian era understandings of the Arctic, which often posited the Arctic as enchanted or even evil. With representations and depictions of the Arctic from the nineteenth century, he shows how a new understanding of this region inspired some people to dissent from the established scientific and geographical viewpoints—developing ideas that he maintains are crucial to our current understanding of the Arctic. Dr. McCorristine is a cultural historian with research interests in spiritualism and psychical research in British culture, the literature of the supernatural, surrealism, and Arctic exploration during the Victorian Period.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:31 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

An Environmental History of Greenland

Drawing from Greenland’s historical record and present-day state, Carson Fellow Ingo Heidbrink examines the country’s risk acceptance of industrialization. Composed largely of fisherman and hunters, Greenland’s economic success depends on the whims of nature; if an industrial gamble fails, a massive loss incurs for Greenland’s inhabitants. Heidbrink delves deeper into the causes of past risk acceptance and Greenland’s current environmental dealings with multi-national corporations. Dr. Heidbrink is a maritime historian and a professor of history at Old Dominion University in Virginia.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:37 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Nature Conservation: The Influence of American Philosophies on Modern China

How have US ideas about nature conservation influenced the conception of nature in China? Carson Fellow Shen Hou bases her research around the nature writings of three well-known American writers—Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson—in order to demonstrate how the idea of preserving nature for humans and for other species has been interpreted and transformed in Chinese culture. Prof. Dr. Hou is currently an assistant professor at the history department of the Renmin University of China in Beijing. She explores the introduction, reception, and transformation of American ideas of nature conservation and its practices in China.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:44 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Landscape Transformation in China

The government-mandated transformation of China’s landscape in the 1960s and 1970s frames Carson Fellow Maohang Bao’s analysis. Bao examines China’s transition from natural terrain to a man-made environment, and particularly its significance for Chinese agricultural development. Bao makes use of environmental history and his own personal experiences as a young boy growing up during the time of this landscape metamorphosis. In addition to that, he tells how his research was enhanced by engaging with the expertise of other Carson Fellows. Prof. Dr. Bao is an associate professor of environmental history and Asia Pacific studies at Peking University in China.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:04 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Fish, Gold, and Cotton: New World Resources in Western Europe

Exposing a phenomenon overlooked by many historians, Carson Fellow Donald Worster explains the importance of New World resources on Western European society in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Worster details the role that gold, silver, fish, lumber, and cotton had on the imagination and thought processes of Europeans in this time period. Prof. Dr. Worster is an American environmental historian and the Hall Distinguished Professor of American History at the University of Kansas, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1989.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:58 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2010

Environmental Mobility History in the Making

Carson Fellow Gijs Mom describes his work on the automobile, which he sees as a vehicle for understanding how people in the early twentieth century both perceived and conquered nature. Mom relies on sources such as literature and film to determine how the car was driven and how driving changed the way that people experienced nature. Prof. Dr. Mom is a historian of technology, teaching and researching at Eindhoven University of Technology, where he is Program Director for Mobility History.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:21 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

The Transformation of Land Use in Brazil

Carson Fellow Stephen Bell explores the intellectual history behind the land development of Brazil in the mid-nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Citing German geographer Leo Waibel’s work as being at the heart of his research, he strives to not only understand how Brazil’s natural resources came to be seen as agricultural resources, but also to synthesize points of theoretical influence between German, American, and Brazilian land development. Prof. Dr. Bell teaches geography and history at University of California, Los Angeles.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
05:00 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Japanese and American Mining Cultures. A Comparison

Initially, when Carson Fellow Timothy LeCain and his colleague began comparing the environmental history of copper mining in the US and Japan, they expected to find different trajectories from each site. However, their research shows an extraordinary convergence—despite the considerable cultural differences between the two mining sites. Ultimately, the values of modernity swept aside other priorities in each country, resulting in the destruction of the physical environment and the poisoning of the air, plants, and important animal species. LeCain’s research findings hold significant implications for the discussion of social constructionism, as industry overwhelms cultures within the global systems. Prof. Dr. LeCain is an associate professor of history at Montana State University.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:51 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Adaption of Local Knowledge Societies and Systems to Global Change

Carson Fellow Gary Martin examines the cultural implications of conservation designation (i.e. the system of preserving certain areas of land in national parks, or related structures, from outside development). Martin explains how protected areas shape the livelihoods of those who live “next door.” He also considers the way that such structures impact both biological and cultural diversity. Martin is an ethno-ecologist who focuses on the inextricable links between biological and cultural diversity and the role of communities in maintaining socio-ecological resilience. Since 1998 Dr. Martin has been a research fellow and lecturer at the School of Anthropology and Conservation at the University of Kent in Canterbury, UK, and in 2000 he founded the Global Diversity Foundation (GDF).
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
04:11 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

The Anthropocene

During this new age in which humans have become one of the many, if not the major, geological factors, Carson Fellow Reinhold Leinfelder ventures to reiterate the impact of humankind on the geological record. To showcase humanity’s contour on physical and cultural landscapes, Leinfelder sets to create a participative exhibition where visitors “test the future” of a sustainable world. A former director general of the Natural History Museum in Munich, Prof. Dr. Leinfelder is now Professor of Invertebrate Paleontology and Geology at Humboldt University in Berlin.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:28 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Integrated Environmental History of Watersheds

How have humans changed rivers throughout history, and what issues of social and environmental justice shape human interaction with rivers and, more generally, water? These questions shape the research of Carson Fellow Melinda Laituri, who is engaged in a comparative study of the Danube and the Colorado River. By using remotely sensed data, Laituri tracks changes in the development of the river; Laituri’s research also examines the human right to water. Prof. Dr. Laituri is currently based in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship at Colorado State University. Her research focuses on the role of the internet and geospatial technologies of disaster management and cross-cultural environmental histories of river basin management.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
05:14 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Incoming Technology and African Innovation

The research of Clapperton Mavhunga is based on a historical approach towards African knowledge production regarding scientific innovation, particularly in technology. He raises the question: is there technology in Africa? The answer to this question is critical considering the persistent negative image of Africa as a continent in crisis. He argues that Africans deliberately import technology in order to fulfil specific purposes and meet existing gaps. The link between these intentional importations and the increasing emigrations constitute a significant element for his research: the intersection of these two phenomena is a crucial aspect in the development of African technology. Prof. Dr. Mavhunga is an assistant professor of science, technology, and society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is a historian of science, technology, and society in Africa.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:13 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

An Environmental History of the Industrial Revolution

Carson Fellow John McNeill is currently working on his new book A Global Environmental History of the Industrial Revolution. In this original project, McNeill reformulates the traditional understanding of the Industrial Revolution, exposing a profoundly ecological and environmental transformation of the world that took place not only in Europe, North America, and Japan but also in the remote places and lands from which the raw materials were extracted. Since 1985, Prof. Dr. McNeill has taught at Georgetown University, where he held the Cinco Hermanos Chair in Environmental and International Affairs before becoming a university professor in 2006.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:34 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

An Environmental History of the Soviet Arctic

Carson Fellow Paul Josephson investigates the transformation of the Soviet Union’s Arctic lands. In addition to the conversion of Czarist institutions, scientists and government leaders supported research into the Arctic conditions, leading to its industrialization. Josephson examines both the achievements of the Soviet Union’s Arctic conquest and its extraordinary environmental and human costs. Prof. Dr. Josephson is a professor of history at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
03:51 Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC) English 2011

Global History of National Parks

Carson Fellow Patrick Kupper focuses on the history of the Swiss National Park as a first step towards writing an international history of conservation in national parks. One of the oldest parks in the world, the Swiss National Park fuses two priorities: nature preservation and scientific research. In particular, Kupper researches conflict at both the local and national levels to supplement and connect the biological and social history of the Swiss National Park to the global narrative of national parks. Dr. Kupper is a senior lecturer of modern history, specializing in environmental history and the history of science at the University of Zurich.
  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society (RCC)
  • Language: English
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