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26:31 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

The award ceremony for the FOM Prizes 2012

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
2:23:26 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Master class with Costas Soukoulis

In the last decade, a new area of photonics research has emerged, that has given the ability to produce materials with entirely novel electromagnetic properties. Known as metamaterials for their ability to take beyond conventional materials. Clearly, the field of metamaterials can develop mould-breaking technologies for a plethora of applications, where control over light (or more generally electromagnetic radiation) is a prominent ingredient�among them telecommunications, solar energy harvesting, biological and THz imaging and sensing, optical isolators and polarizers. In this talk, I give an introduction into this emerging field, review recent progress, and highlight remaining challenges and opportunities.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
1:53:30 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Master class with Sibylle Günter

Nuclear fusion could play a major role in the energy mix during the second half of this century. The advantages of nuclear fusion, in particular for base load power stations, are obvious: the fuel is nearly unlimited and widely available, and - in contrast to fission - there is no possibility of a runaway reaction or meltdown. After more than 50 years of research, fusion has advanced to the decisive step on the way to a power plant: the international tokamak experiment ITER is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of net energy production from nuclear fusion reactions. For a fusion reactor, matter has to be heated up to extremely high temperatures: more than 100 million degrees - about a factor of 10 hotter than the sun's core. At these temperatures the material is fully ionized. The charged particles can be confined by magnetic fields, which are also able to provide the required efficient heat insulation. For magnetic fusion reactions to be self-sustaining, the thermal insulation has to be a factor of 100 better than that of polystyrene - at temperatures, where the velocity of particles approaches one fifth of the velocity of light! The physics basis of such magnetic confinement will be discussed. The two alternative concepts on the way to a fusion power plant: the tokamak and the stellarator will be introduced and the remaining scientific challenges for magnetic fusion will be discussed.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
54:19 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Opening lecture with Sibylle Günter

Professor Sibylle Günter has been the Scientific Director of the German 'Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics' (IPP) since February 2011. She took her degree in physics at the University of Rostock in 1987 and three years later completed her PhD at the Department of Theoretical Physics there. Subsequently she worked at the University of Rostock, the University of Maryland and at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). She qualified for a lectureship at the University of Rostock in 1996 with a thesis entitled 'Optical Properties of Dense Plasmas' and she still gives lectures there. Since 2006 she has also held a part-time professorship at the Technical University Munich.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
40:35 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Closing lecture with Anette (Peko) Hosoi

Professor Anette (Peko) Hosoi has been an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT (Cambridge, US) since 2006. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago in 1997 and first came to MIT as an Applied Mathematics Instructor from 1998 until 2000. She joined the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in 2002. Hosoi is a specialist in free surface flows, surface tension, and the fluid dynamics of complex fluids. From 2004 until 2006 she was the Doherty Professor in Ocean Utilization. She has won numerous teaching awards, including the Ruth and Joel S. Spira Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Junior Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching. In 2010 MIT selected her to be a MacVicar Fellow.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
34:06 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Tuesday evening lecture with Stan Bentvelsen

Professor Stan Bentvelsen is programme leader of the FOM programme 'Exploration of new phenomena at the highest energy frontier with D0 and ATLAS' at Nikhef and is closely involved in the Higgs research at CERN. Bentvelsen studied Theoretical Physics at the University of Amsterdam and completed his PhD cum laude in experimental high-energy physics there in 1994. From 1994 until 2000 he was a staff researcher at CERN in Geneva. He then became a senior scientist at FOM-Nikhef. Since 2005 he has been Professor of 'Collider physics at the LHC' at the University of Amsterdam and programme leader at FOM. Bentvelsen is also a member of the FOM Governing Board.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
35:06 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Tuesday Evening lecture with Leo Kouwenhoven

Professor Leo Kouwenhoven has led the FOM focus group 'Solid State Quantum Information Processes' since 2004 and is well known for his publications about the Majorana fermions. He works at Delft University of Technology where he also gained his degree in 1988 and his PhD cum laude in 1992. After his PhD he was a postdoc at the University of California at Berkeley for one year. He then returned to Delft as an Academy Researcher at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1998 he became a Professor of Physics. Kouwenhoven was also visiting Professor at the Physics Department of Harvard University for one year and in 2007 he received the NWO Spinoza Prize, the highest award in Dutch science.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
1:31:10 OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM) English 2013

Master class with Anne Green

Observations indicate that the Universe contains a significant amount of cold dark matter, and particle physics provides us with a well-motivated dark matter candidate in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). After a brief overview of the evidence for dark matter and the physics behind WIMPs, the masterclass will focus on detecting WIMPs. WIMPs can be detected directly, via their elastic scattering off nuclei in the lab, or indirectly, via the products of their annihilation. We will discuss the principles, current status and future prospects of both types of experiment.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: OpenWebcast.nl, Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
  • Language: English
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