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33:07 NixCon English 2018

require.nix: dependency management for your favorite

Nix is a fantastic tool for managing the dependencies of your development projects, but ironically the Nix language itself has very limited facilities for modular code reuse and composition. In this talk, I will present on my recent experiments with a system, inspired by node.js's "require" mechanism, to define packages of nix language code that can depend on other packages. Together with conventions encouraging detailed documentation, good error messages, and clean interfaces, I hope this project can form the seed for a robust ecosystem of libraries and tools that can help move us past the monolith of nixpkgs and enable us to more easily benefit from each others' work. --- Bio: Shea is a lead engineer at Target's data science and optimization group, whose production stack is built with Nix. He has been part of the NixOS community since 2010, has been working professionally with Nix since 2012, and is part of the Nix core team.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
02:36 NixCon English 2018

NixOS on Chromebooks

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
26:27 NixCon English 2018

Building pnpm2nix: yet another npm to nix tool

There are already plenty of node package managers so why yet another one? This talk aims to give you an overview of the current npm-to-nix ecosystem, what tools there are, what the strengths/shortcomings of each one have and what pnpm is all about and how it pertains to nix. After that I will be talking you through what goes in to building pnpm2nix, what problems I had along the way and how nix/nixpkgs could improve to help such efforts along. --- Bio: I love building software
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
30:43 NixCon English 2018

Cachix - binary cache(s) for everyone

This talk is going to cover how to best use Cachix in hobby and professional manner to ease development and adoption of Nix. Talk is also going to cover the motivation how Cachix came to be, what are the design decision behind it and their consequences, usage statistics and where it's possibly headed. --- Bio: Domen Kozar: I've started using Nix in 2012 and after years of many contributions in free time, started using Nix exclusively in 2016 packaging up OpenStack and functional testing a cluster with scenarios. In 2016 I've founded Enlambda consulting which helped many clients like Snabb and IOHK to adopt Nix as a way to solve interesting complex software distribution problems in our industry. Robert Hensing: Nix user since early 2016, Nix and Haskell freelancer since 2017. You may have caught him on stack overflow with a solution, advice or bad news. He is convinced that the future is not just immutable, but functional. Link to slides: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BwzQu6RqRR5zeFpBckw1M3Q3eXBPdW5kWmIyWmo0TTA0X0pr
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
31:00 NixCon English 2018

Redesigning NixOS Networking

Description:NixOS networking has been the source of weird bugs for years. There is no simple mapping between systemd units and the setup and teardown of network interfaces and its interdependencies. The systemd project is aware of that and implemented systemd-networkd to manage networking configuration. There even is a second implementation of the NixOS networking interface that uses systemd-netword but in its current state has some drawbacks and inconsistencies that prevent using it by default. The question for NixOS is if the adoption of systemd-networkd is desired and if a redesign of the current config interface to support as much features as possible is needed. This talk presents my findings around the topic, some design ideas concerning a possible interface and my personal wishlist of useful and cool networking features that should be supported. --- Bio: Grumpy infrastructure engineer, NixOS security team & retired release manager
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
20:10 NixCon English 2018

Nix as HPC package management system

Modern High Performance Computing systems are becoming larger and more heterogeneous. The proper management of software for the users of such systems poses a significant challenge. These users run very diverse applications that may be compiled with proprietary tools for specialized hardware. Moreover, the application life-cycle of these software may exceed the lifetime of the HPC systems themselves. These difficulties motivate the use of specialized package management systems. In this presentation, we outline an approach to HPC package development, deployment, management, sharing, and reuse based on the Nix functional package manager. We report our experience with this approach inside the GRICAD HPC center in Grenoble, France, and compare it to other existing approaches. --- After a PhD in applied mathematics, I have worked in the scientific computing field, with a strong HPC component.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
30:58 NixCon English 2018

Nix(OS) modules everywhere!

Description:I'll talk about how I've implemented a deployment system from scratch in Nix for a client, and show how Nix(OS) modules can be used outside NixOS in productive ways. --- Bio: Freelancing devops engineer interested in functional programming and declarative deployments.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
04:25 NixCon English 2018

hnix

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
03:53 NixCon English 2018

state of the NixOS wiki

Tristan Helmich
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
19:48 NixCon English 2018

NixOS 18.09 release managers

The release managers talking about the latest NixOS release
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
35:51 NixCon English 2018

Nix roadmap

Our BDFL will be talking about the Nix roadmap --- Bio: Eelco is a senior software engineer at Tweag I/O. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from Utrecht University in 2006 and was a postdoctoral researcher at Utrecht University and Delft University. As part of his PhD research project at Utrecht University, he developed Nix, the purely functional package manager, which forms the basis of the NixOS Linux distribution. He previously worked at LogicBlox and Infor.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
04:26 NixCon English 2018

NixCon 2018 - Welcome

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
04:40 NixCon English 2018

lazy dev env

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
26:29 NixCon English 2018

Building and Testing Database extensions with Nix

When building extensions for databases, it can become burdensome to make sure you build and deploy matching versions. This often involves changing the version number in multiple places or custom scripting, in particular when deploying extensions to other environments. In this talk I will cover two cases of building database extensions for PostgreSQL and Redis, as well as how to use Nix to manage Python environments to run tests against temporary instances of the database. Finally I will briefly discuss building docker images for the database with the extension installed. --- Bio: John is a software engineer at InfoSum, where he works on the core components of their customer data platform. At InfoSum, he uses Nix to build several C projects as well as managing python dependencies, and has been using NixOS as his primary operating system for over a year. In his free time, John enjoys experimenting with Haskell, playing board games and going bouldering.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
02:03 NixCon English 2018

Presenting nix-writers

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
03:29 NixCon English 2018

Building static executables with Nix

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
27:40 NixCon English 2018

Nix for software deployment in high energy physics

High energy physics, and large scale research in general, has both common and unusual requirements for computing. Software must be distributed across a wide range of non-heterogeneous resources, with single experiments able to continuously utilise many 10,000s of globally distributed machines. Exploitation of data continues for decades after it is first taken, making reproducibility and stability essential. The use of Nix has been tested within LHCb, one of the four large experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In this talk we will discuss the conclusions of this testing, how Nix is suited to the needs of the ""big science"" community, as well as presenting some of the challenges which have been found when testing Nix. --- Bio: PhD student in high energy physics at the University of Manchester, UK and a member of the LHCb Collaboration studying the decays of Charm quarks. Interested utilising tools from outside the high energy physics community to make the use of computing more efficient.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
35:42 NixCon English 2018

How to make Nix ./pleasing to use at work

At Release Engineering within Mozilla, we develop and support Firefox release pipelines that help Firefox developers test their patches and Release Management plan and execute Firefox releases. Release Engineering manage a number of services where each one aids in achieving these pipelines. e.g. kicking off and tracking a new release, analyzing the source code, and providing external dependencies for building and testing. Currently we use Nix to manage deployment and development of these services.. For this purpose, we wrote a small wrapper around Nix, to make interaction with Nix easier, and help with on-boarding. In this talk, I would like to share my experience of Nix adoption at Mozilla, especially within the Release Engineering / Management team. How we overcome some shortcoming of Nix-the-tool and what is still waiting for us to improve. What worked well and where Nix failed us. The main goal of this talk is to help others who are looking to introduce Nix at work, to know how to set expectations and what an such effort looks like. --- Bio: Rok is a Release Engineer at Mozilla, in Berlin. He is part of the Release Engineering team which helps ship Firefox and other Mozilla products. He is the author of pypi2nix tool, which tries to package python packages in Nix. In his free time … he hasn't had free time since his son was born.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
32:28 NixCon English 2018

vpsAdminOS

Description:Building a lightweight hypervisor for Linux system containers on top of NixOS and not-os. How we adopted Nix ecosystem to allow migration of our production infrastructure from OpenVZ to LXC. --- Bio: Opensource software and hardware hacker
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
35:19 NixCon English 2018

Migrating a Hosting Infrastructure from Gentoo

I would like to share our experiences while migrating a VM-based hosting infrastructure at Flying Circus Internet Operations from Gentoo to NixOS. It is a case study of migrating 500+ VM running diverse customer projects using a wide range of web technologies. I'll cover the following main points: 1. What was our motivation to change to NixOS? Which specific features of NixOS attracted us? 2. Creating a NixOS-based hosting platform - What did we have to implement? What is still missing? 3. What are the pain points? How could NixOS become more attractive? 4. What do our users think? -- benefits and stumbling blocks. --- Bio: Christian is a systems engineer working with Flying Circus Internet Operations in Halle (Saale), Germany. He works mainly on infrastructure which keeps customers' web applications running. Main programming languages are Python, Nix, Rust. Christian is a regular contributor to NixOS, most known for vulnix and vulnerability roundups.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
22:54 NixCon English 2018

Beyond NixOps: Compute Fleet Operations with NixOS

For my day job, I operate a compute fleet on a mixture of private and public cloud. We started out with NixOps, but ultimately found ourselves constrained by its limitations and "pet"-focused approach, so I ended up learning a lot by building our own cattle-focused deployment tool.--- Bio: Hi! I'm edef, and I build software and services for other people to build software and services with
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
05:09 NixCon English 2018

SCYLLA CI

Using some of the features of Nix 2, it's possible to build a rather fully featured but easy to use and understand Continues Integration Service. Scylla is an attempt to create a new platform for CI, more similar to ofBorg, but specialized for many smaller projects.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
33:51 NixCon English 2018

Nix for data pipeline configuration

My team develops a data pipeline to generate music recommendations. It consists of many batch jobs that read data from somewhere and write their output somewhere else, with complex dependencies and parameter tuning. Historically, we have configured these batch jobs with hand-written bash configuration, or with dedicated python-based tools such as Airflow. However, both lack flexibility, often forcing the developer to bypass them and to run jobs manually during development. The tasks of data pipeline configuration and package definition share some requirements: both imply running many programs in a specific order and with specific parameters. Since nix is a language dedicated to packages definition, which allows expressing packages in a succinct and highly flexible way, we decided to try to use it for data pipeline configuration. Nix-the-tool is too centered around package management for our use case, so we built our own tool around nix-the-language. It this talk, we’ll explore how to apply nix to data pipeline configuration. This will give us the opportunity to look at nix as a language, abstracted from its current ecosystem. We’ll also explore how to structure a nix codebase, encountering the same questions nixpkgs encountered a long time ago, but in a much smaller environment. The main goal of this talk is to share the different point of view of nix that comes from applying it to a different problem and starting from scratch. We also hope to serve as an inspiration to explore other nix-based DSLs. --- Bio: Georges is a Software Engineer at SoundCloud, in Berlin. He is part of the team that generates music recommendations. He loves exploring new ways to solve engineering problems, which led him to look into exciting technologies such as Haskell and NixOS. Some of his favorites hobbies are playing board games and learning German.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
21:52 NixCon English 2018

Nix at Home - Configuration management for your House!

My talk I'm proposing is on how to use nix at home in a variety of different ways. We'll start with the basics, a single git repository with multiple machine configurations cloned to /etc/nixos. From there we'll talk about how to deploy machines using nixops with the none backend, specifically in the context of a home router machine with multiple interfaces running all the basic services needed for a secure usable home network. From their we'll foray into how nixos generations works under the hood a bit and talk about IOHK's work at making a remote deployable mac system using nix-darwin, as well as some custom code I wrote that allows you to run nix systemd services (example being prometheus node exporter) on any linux system. We'll wrap the talk up with some discussion about using nix for home automation and monitoring as well as a chance for Q&A. --- Bio: I've been involved with the nix community for a little over a year. I help out on IRC whenever I have a chance (disasm). I work on the devops team of IOHK using nix and haskell on a daily basis. I've been using nixops to deploy my main home router for a little over 6 months, and have been using custom haskell to deploy my mac systems using nix-darwin for about 3 months.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
32:57 NixCon English 2018

Dysnomia: complementing Nix deployments

One of the main goals of the tools in the Nix project is to fully automate deployments from declarative specifications. Thanks to the underlying purely functional deployment model of the Nix package manager, we get strong guarantees that dependencies are complete, we get (nearly) bit identical builds, and we can do atomic upgrades and rollbacks. Although Nix deployments are very powerful, the tools in the Nix project only manage the static parts of a system, such as packages and configuration files. Nix does not manage any state, such as databases. As a result, when deploying a NixOS configuration to a different machine, we get the same static system configuration (e.g. packages and configuration), but any state must still be manually migrated and deployed. In a network of machines, this could become very tedious. In this talk, I will show Dysnomia, a deployment tool inspired by Nix that can be used to manage units of state, such as databases. It makes units of states uniformly accessible (it has a plugin system supporting many kinds of state and databases), executes various deployment activities (e.g. activation, deactivation) and can manage snapshots of state in a snapshot store that has similarities with the Nix store. Dysnomia can be used as an independent tool, but is more useful when it is combined with tools in the Nix project -- we can automatically deploy databases as part of a NixOS configuration and we can combine it with Disnix to automatically migrate databases from one machine to another. --- Sander is a contributor to the Nix project since late 2007. He contributed to many areas in the Nix-ecosystem. He started the Android build environment. He maintains various Nix-related tools, such as Disnix, node2nix, NiJS, and composer2nix.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
30:05 NixCon English 2018

NixWRT: purely functional firmware images for IoT

Reflashing your broadband router with Linux (e.g. DD-WRT, OpenWRT, Tomato or variants) gives you unparalleled flexibility to do things that the manufacturer probably hadn't thought of. Remembering what you did, six months later, is often trickier. NixWRT is a (currently experimental) collection of derivations using the Nix package system and bits of NixOS to build router and IoT device firmware images using the principles of declarativity and composability that are why we love Nix. This talk will give you an overview of how it works, some war stories about the challenges faced, and hopefully the data you need to to decide whether to try it yourself on your own hardware. --- Bio: Daniel Barlow has been using Linux since kernel 0.99 (Slackware and MCC-Interim), and has never really adjusted as computing has moved on. Playing with resource-limited systems like routers and IoT devices helps him pretend it's still 1995. Since then he's programmed professionally in Perl, Common Lisp and Ruby, and played with Clojure and Nix. Most likely to say: ""try looking at it with ?"" Least likely to say: ""just buy a closed-source solution from an enterprise vendor""
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
32:43 NixCon English 2018

About the Nix sandboxes and breakpoints

Nix's build sandbox is one of the key enablers to ensure we can build our packages on every machine in the same way. It normalizes the build environment and restricts access to non-reproducible file and network resources. However at times it can be difficult and time consuming to figure out why a long running build failed. In this talk I will give a brief overview about the anatomy of Nix's sandbox on Linux. Then I will show how we can leverage breakpoints in builder scripts to inspect failures in the sandbox as they happen. Finally I will present dynamic tracing techniques based on the sysdig framework that can show likely impurities in the build process to hint to root cause of build failures. --- Bio: I do my PhD in University of Edinburgh where I work in systems research. When I am not reconstructing program failures from hardware traces and coredumps, I review and merge pull requests in nixpkgs or work on the NUR platform
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: NixCon
  • Language: English
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AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)