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51:13 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

The HLF Portraits: Butler W. Lampson

The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation presents the HLF Portraits: Butler W. Lampson; ACM A.M. Turing Award, 1992 Recipients of the ACM A.M. Turing Award and the Abel Prize in discussion with Marc Pachter, Director Emeritus National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, about their lives, their research, their careers and the circumstances that led to the awards. Video interviews produced for the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation by the Berlin photographer Peter Badge. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
10:23 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2015

2nd HLF - Hot Topic - Panel Discussion Part 2 - The Role of Mathematics and Computer Sciences in Developing Countries -

Hot Topic Title: “The Role of Mathematics and Computer Science in Developing Countries“ Discussion: "How to raise the number of female Mathematicians and Computer Scientists" Experts discuss the role and potential of mathematics and computer science in developing countries and emerging economies at the 2nd Heidelberg Laureate Forum. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:01:13 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

The HLF Portraits: Vinton Gray Cerf

The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation presents the HLF Portraits: Vinton Gray Cerf; ACM A.M. Turing Award, 2004 Recipients of the ACM A.M. Turing Award and the Abel Prize in discussion with Marc Pachter, Director Emeritus National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, about their lives, their research, their careers and the circumstances that led to the awards. Video interviews produced for the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation by the Berlin photographer Peter Badge. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
14:31 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2015

2nd HLF - Hot Topic - Panel Discussion Part 3 - The Role of Mathematics and Computer Sciences in Developing Countries -

Hot Topic Title: “The Role of Mathematics and Computer Science in Developing Countries“ Discussion: "How to promote Mathematics and Computer Science" Experts discuss the role and potential of mathematics and computer science in developing countries and emerging economies at the 2nd Heidelberg Laureate Forum.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
19:59 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Martin Hellman

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
19:45 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Madhu Sudan

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
21:09 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Manuel Blum

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
23:22 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Leslie Lamport

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
05:24 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interview with journalists: Elna Schütz

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
03:59 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interview with journalists: Guillermo P Curbera

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:04:22 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Fred Brooks

Fred Brooks: “What Makes the Illusion Work? Studies in Effective Immersive Virtual Environments” A virtual environment (VE) is a technological display to the senses that undertakes to make the user believe (to some degree) and behave as if he is present elsewhere. The vision, proposed by Sutherland in 1965, has driven a half-century of research and development, some at Chapel Hill. A major scientific challenge is how to measure the effectiveness of a VE system, the degree to which it causes the user to behave as if the illusion is real. We have pursued many measurement methods, arriving finally at physiological measurement of subconscious user responses, a measure that is objective, valid, quantitative, and contemporaneous. Our parameter studies of VE systems show, among other things, that system latency is a major factor, whereas the quality of illumination simulation has little effect. Display to the senses of feel, added to visual and aural, also makes a substantial difference. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
55:48 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF - Lindau Lecture: Brian Schmidt

Our Universe was created in 'The Big Bang' and has been expanding ever since. I will describe the vital statistics of the Universe, including its size, weight, shape, age, and composition. I will also try to make sense of the Universe's past, present, and future – and describe what we know and what we do not yet know about the Cosmos. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
53:29 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Joseph Sifakis

Joseph Sifakis: “On the Nature of Computing” Computing is a domain of knowledge. Knowledge is truthful information that embedded into the right network of conceptual interrelations can be used to understand a subject or solve a problem. According to this definition, Physics, Biology but also Mathematics, Engineering, Social Sciences and Cooking are all domains of knowledge. This definition encompasses both, scientific knowledge about physical phenomena and engineering knowledge applied to design and build artefacts. For all domains of knowledge, Mathematics and Logic provide the models and their underlying laws; they formalize a priori knowledge which is independent of experience. Computing with Physics and Biology is a basic domain of knowledge. In contrast to the other basic domains, it is rooted in a priori knowledge and deals with the study of information processing – both what can be computed and how to compute it. To understand and master the world, domains of knowledge share two common methodological principles. They use abstraction hierarchies to cope with scale problems. To cope with complexity, they use modularity. We point out similarities and differences in the application of these two methodological principles and discuss inherent limitations common to all domains. In particular, we attempt a comparison between natural systems and computing systems by addressing two issues: 1) Linking physicality and computation; 2) Linking natural and artificial intelligence. Computing and Physical Sciences share a common objective: the study of dynamic systems. A big difference is that physical systems are inherently synchronous. They cannot be studied without reference to time-space while models of computation ignore physical time and resources. Physical systems are driven by uniform laws while computing systems are driven by laws enforced by their designers. Another important difference lies in the discrete nature of Computing that limits its ability to fully capture physical phenomena. Linking physicality and computation is at the core of the emerging Cyber physical systems discipline. We discuss limitations in bridging the gap between physical and discrete computational phenomena, stemming from the identified differences. Living organisms intimately combine intertwined physical and computational phenomena that have a deep impact on their development and evolution. They share common characteristics with computing systems such as the use of memory and languages. Compared to conscious thinking, computers are much faster and more precise. This confers computers the ability to successfully compete with humans in solving problems that involve the exploration of large spaces of solutions or the combination of predefined knowledge e.g. AlphaGo's recent winning performance. We consider that Intelligence is the ability to formalize human knowledge and create knowledge by applying rules of reasoning. Under this definition, a first limitation stems from our apparent inability to formalize natural languages and create models for reasoning about the world. A second limitation comes from the fact that computers cannot discover induction hypotheses as a consequence of Gödel's incompleteness theorems. We conclude by arguing that Computing drastically contributes to the development of knowledge through cross-fertilization with other domains as well as enhanced predictability and designability. In particular, it complements and enriches our understanding of the world with a constructive and computational view different from the declarative and analytic adopted by physical sciences. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
52:59 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF - Laureate Lectures: Sir Michael Atiyah

Sir Michael Atiyah: “The Soluble and the Insoluble” What do we mean by a solution to a problem? This is both a philosophical question, and a practical one, which depends on what one is trying to achieve and the means, time and money available. The explosion in computer technology keeps changing the goal posts. I will reflect on these issues, primarily from the viewpoint of an elderly mathematician. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
25:53 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2015

3rd HLF - Hot Topic Presentations - Brave New Data World: (Re)Framing the Privacy Debate

Alessandro Acquisti (Carnegie Mellon University) (Re)Framing the Privacy Debate “I present a series of results from studies and experiments investigating the economics of privacy, the behavioral economics of privacy, and privacy in online social networks. The results illustrate surprising trade-offs that emerge from the protection and sharing of personal information, and the inadequacy of “notice and consent” mechanisms for privacy protection. Based on these studies, I will advocate a change in the way we frame, and think about, the privacy debate.” The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The 4th Heidelberg Laureate Forum will take place from September 18 to 23, 2016. The HLF was initiated by the German foundation Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science, and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS). The Forum is organized by the HLFF in cooperation with KTS and HITS as well as the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the International Mathematical Union (IMU), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA). www.heidelberg-laureate-forum.org
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
49:54 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Vladimir Voevodsky

Vladimir Voevodsky: “UniMath” UniMath is a library of formalized mathematics that is based on the Univalent Foundations and written in what we call the UniMath language which is a small subset of the language of the Coq proof assistant. I wrote the core of the library under the name Foundations in 2010-11 to try out whether the Univalent Foundations can be used with Coq to formalize some real mathematics. After discovering that it can we, Benedikt Ahrens, Dan Grayson and myself, formed a GitHub organization called UniMath. Today UniMath has 12 authors, about 7 of them, including all three of the founders, are active in expanding and improving the library. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
35:16 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Sir Michael Francis Atiyah

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
19:50 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2015

2nd HLF - Hot Topic Presentations - The Role of Mathematics and Computer Sciences in Developing Countries

Hot Topic Title: “The Role of Mathematics and Computer Science in Developing Countries“ Presentation: "How Herbicides Advanced Applied Math in Ecuador" - For the slides, please visit: http://www.slideshare.net/HLForum/ht-benner-mena2014slideshare Abstract: "In this talk we discuss the recent development of Applied Mathematics in Ecuador. It started with setting up a partnership PhD program between Technische Universität of Berlin (Germany) and Escuela Politecnica Nacional (Ecuador) supported by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). A major turning point for an improvement in the situation of Applied Mathematics in Ecuador was getting a funded research project "Simulation of the Glyphosate Aerial Spray Drift at the Ecuador - Colombia border". We briefly discuss the goals, results, difficulties and achievements of the project and how this helped to change situation of Applied Mathematics in Ecuador." The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
51:33 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Sir Tony Hoare

Sir Tony Hoare: “A finite geometric representation of computer program behaviour” Scientists often illustrate the behaviour of a dynamic system by a geometric diagram, in which one dimension represents the passage of time, and the other(s) represent distribution of objects in space. We develop a non-metric finite plane geometry as an intuitive representation of the behaviour of a computer program running on a modern distributed network of concurrent processors. Our hope is to prove a collection of algebraic laws that are used for the implementation and optimisation of programs. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
32:38 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

5th HLF – Lecture: Self-Supervised Visual Learning and Synthesis

Computer vision has made impressive gains through the use of deep learning models, trained with large-scale labeled data. However, labels require expertise and curation and are expensive to collect. Can one discover useful visual representations without the use of explicitly curated labels? In this talk, I will present several case studies exploring the paradigm of self-supervised learning – using raw data as its own supervision. Several ways of defining objective functions in high-dimensional spaces will be discussed, including the use of General Adversarial Networks (GANs) to learn the objective function directly from the data. Applications in image synthesis will be shown, including automatic colorization, paired and unpaired image-to-image translation (aka pix2pix and cycleGAN), and, terrifyingly, #edges2cats. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
51:38 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Raj Reddy

Raj Reddy: “Too Much Information and Too Little Time” This talk is about having to cope with too much information within human time limitations given that we are not changing at exponential rates like semiconductors. Humans make errors, tend to forget, are impatient and look for least effort solutions. Such limitations, sometimes, lead to catastrophic results. At the same time, humans learn with experience, tolerate error and ambiguity, use vast amounts of knowledge, and communicate using speech and language. Such features are still lacking in most of our systems. Most systems don’t get better with experience. Future opportunities lie in creating tools for coping with 21st century world of “too much information and too little time”. In this talk we will present two families of intelligent agents, viz., “cognition amplifiers” and “guardian angels” to help with problem of scarcity of attention. A Cognition Amplifier is a personal autonomic intelligent agent that anticipates what you want to do and helps you to do it with less effort. A Guardian Angel is a personal autonomic intelligent agent that discovers and warns you about unanticipated, possibly catastrophic, events that could impact your safety, security, and wellbeing. Both Cogs and Gats are enduring, autonomic, nonintrusive intelligent agents which are always-on, always working, and always-learning. Future breakthroughs will emerge from those who understand human limitations and can cater to such human needs. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
30:38 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

5th HLF – Lecture: Approximate Elimination

We provide context for and explain the recent Approximate Gaussian Elimination algorithm of Kyng and Sachdeva. Gaussian Elimination is the first algorithm most of us learn for solving systems of linear equations. While it is simple and elegant, it can also be impractically slow. Kyng and Sachdeva show that, after carefully modifying elimination to randomly drop and rescale entries, it can provide very fast approximate solutions to systems of equations in Laplacian matrices. Our implementation of a refinement of this algorithm is now among the best Laplacian solvers in practice. We will explain what Laplacian matrices are, what it means to approximately solve a system of linear equations over the reals, and how one analyzes this algorithm using recent results in Random Matrix Theory. We will also discuss what is means for an algorithm to be the "best in practice." The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
39:48 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

5th HLF – Lecture: Asymptotic Group Theory

The talk is a very general survey of Asymptotic Group Theory. We will focus on growth of groups, growth of graphs and links to Combinatorics and Number Theory. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
34:36 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

5th HLF – Lecture: Deep Learning Research

This talk will cover the basics of machine learning and then talk about interesting directions in deep learning. Deep learning has become an important aspect of machine learning since it has been applied very successfully to many applied problems. The focus of the talk will be on directions related to understanding why deep learning works so well rather than applications. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
19:22 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2015

2nd HLF - Hot Topic Presentations - Mathematics and Computer Science in Developing Nations

Hot Topic Title: “The Role of Mathematics and Computer Science in Developing Countries“ Presentation: "Science, technology engineering and mathematics for develpment of Cambodia" - For the slides, please visit: http://www.slideshare.net/HLForum/ht-nguonphan-2014slideshare Abstract: "Cambodia’s vision by 2030 is to become a country with upper-middle income. But its education system has failed to produce relevant and qualified workforce required by the economy, which causes a skill mismatch and shortage in the labor market. The economy is currently mainly based on agriculture, garment and textile, tourism and construction where science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) have been left behind. However, in recent years the royal government has realize the importance to move from resource-driven growth that rely on cheap labor and capital to high productivity and innovation based growth where STEM plays the main role. This presentation discussed the status and implementation of STEM for the development of Cambodia." The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
15:37 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

4th HLF – Hot Topic: Artificial Intelligence – Presentation Raj Reddy

Analyzing the challenges posed by Artificial Intelligence at the 4th Heidelberg Laureate Forum – Experts discuss the costs and benefits created by developments brought on by Artificial Intelligence. In recent years, Artificial Intelligence (AI) has established itself at the forefront of technological innovation. That is precisely why AI was the focus of the Hot Topic at the 4th Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). The session was comprised of a panel discussion with leading researchers debating the current scientific trends in AI and its applications. Today, AI is no longer a brash, cryptic concept taken directly from the pages of science fiction. The developments owed to the technology based on AI have altered what we thought possible and has done so in a much quicker fashion than was predicted. The power behind these advancements is already very evident with self-driving cars or algorithms that profile our Internet activity in order to tailor ads and search results. Though fascinating, this progress comes with a price of control and privacy loss that incites ethical questions. The Hot Topic session took place on September 20, 2016. Speaker: Raj Reddy from Carnegie Mellon University won the ACM A.M. Turing Award in 1994. He was the founding director of CMU’s robotics lab, and his latest research centers around “Technology in Service of Society”. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The 4th Heidelberg Laureate Forum took place from September 18 to 23, 2016. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing as of 2017), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize).
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
02:52 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interview with journalists: Shubashree Desikan

  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
50:18 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Sir Andrew Wiles

Sir Andrew Wiles: “Equations in arithmetic” I will describe some of the interactions between modern number theory and the problem of solving equations in rational numbers or integers'. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
53:48 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Leslie Lamport

Leslie Lamport: “The PlusCal Algorithm Language” An algorithm is not a program, so why describe it with a programming language? PlusCal is a tiny toy-like language that is infinitely more expressive than any programming language because an expression can be any mathematical formula. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
45:49 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Ngô Bảo Châu

Ngô Bảo Châu: “The Riemann zeta function and its generalizations” Since the publication of Riemann’s memoir on prime numbers less than a given magnitude, the zeta function has never ceased to fascinate mathematicians. We will discuss its many appearances and generalizations in number theory. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
42:48 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2016

4th HLF - Laureate Lectures: John E. Hopcroft

John E. Hopcroft: “Exciting Computer Science Research Directions” We have entered the information age and this has changed the nature of computer science and created many exciting research problems. Two of these are extracting information from large data sources and learning theory. This talk will focus on two problems: first, how to find hidden structure in social networks and second some subareas of research in deep learning. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
33:12 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Press conference with experts on the topic of Quantum Computing: Panel with Jay Gambetta and Chris Monroe

Jay Gambetta (IBM) and Chris Monroe (University of Maryland) sit down for a Q&A with journalists at the 5th Heidelberg Laureate Forum, September 2017. Gambetta and Monroe addressed fundamental issues revolving around quantum computing and shed light on its potential. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
19:12 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Alexei Efros

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
12:54 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Frederick Brooks

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
07:10 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2015

3rd HLF Hot Topic "Brave New Data World"

Scientists and Society face the ethical challenges of computational science together. The 3rd Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF) hosted a multi-faceted discussion riveted on Big Data and resolving challenges produced by computational science. The Hot Topic, ‘Brave New Data World’, was broken down into presentations from leading authorities, moderated workshops and an open debate among the participants. The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) strives to create the opportunity for progressive discourse to flourish, which is most effectively championed by the conglomeration of diverse mindsets. The Hot Topic dove into enigmatic questions that are woven throughout computational science. How secure is our data? How is intellectual property evolving? Should we blindly accept massive data mining? How is computational science most effectively used for good? How should we regulate this ‘brave new data world’? Set to address these issues were: Alessandro Acquisti of Carnegie Mellon University, Kristin Tolle of Microsoft Research Outreach and Jeremy Gillula of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. The Hot Topic was coordinated by Michele Catanzaro, author of “Networks: A Very Short Introduction” and a highly accomplished freelance science journalist. Michele saw the 3rd HLF as an ideal environment and “fertile ground for making scientists provocative and constructive allies to the public”. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The 4th Heidelberg Laureate Forum will take place from September 18 to 23, 2016. The HLF was initiated by the German foundation Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science, and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS). The Forum is organized by the HLFF in cooperation with KTS and HITS as well as the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), the International Mathematical Union (IMU), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA). www.heidelberg-laureate-forum.org
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
14:47 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

5th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Efim Zelmanov

Laureates at the 5th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
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