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24:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

TileServer: Hosting Map Tiles And MBTiles

OpenGIS Web Map Tiling Service (WMTS) is becoming the standard used for distributing raster maps to the web and mobile applications, cell-phones, tablets as well as desktop software. Practically all popular desktop GIS products now support this standard as well, including ESRI ArcGIS for Desktop, open-source Quantum GIS (qgis) and uDig, etc. The TileServer, a new open-source software project, is going to be demonstrated. It is able to serve maps from an ordinary web-hosting and provide an efficient OGC WMTS compliant map tile service for maps pre-rendered with MapTiler, MapTiler Cluster, GDAL2Tiles, TileMill or available in MBTiles format. The presentation will demonstrate compatibility with ArcGIS client and other desktop GIS software, with popular web APIs (such as Google Maps, MapBox, OpenLayers, Leaflet) and with mobile SDKs. We will show a complete workflow from a GeoTIFF file (Ordnance Survey OpenData) with custom spatial reference coordinate system (OSGB / EPSG:27700) to the online service (OGC WMTS) provided from an ordinary web-hosting. The software has been originally developed by Klokan Technologies GmbH (Switzerland) in cooperation with NOAA (The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA) and it has been successfully used to expose detailed aerial photos during disaster relief actions, for example on the crisis response for Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Isaac in 2012. The software was able to handle large demand from an ordinary in-house web server without any issues. The geodata were displayed in a web application for general public and provided to GIS clients for professional use - thanks to compatibility with ArcIMS. It can be easily used for serving base maps, aerial photos or any other raster geodata. It very easy to apply - just copy the project files to a PHP-enabled directory along with your map data containing metadata.json file. The online service can be easily protected with password or burned-in watermarks made during the geodata rendering. Tiles are served directly by Apache web server with mod rewrite rules as static files and therefore are very fast and with correct HTTP caching headers. The web interface and XML metadata are delivered via PHP, because it allows deployment on large number of existing web servers including variety of free web hosting providers. There is no need to install any additional software on the webserver. The mapping data can be easily served in the standardized form from in-house web servers, or from practically any standard web-hosting provider (the cheap unlimited tariffs are applicable too), and from a private cloud. The same principle can be applied on an external content distribution network (Amazon S3 / CloudFront) to serve the geodata with higher speed and reliability by automatically caching it geographically closer to your online visitors, while still paying only a few cents per transferred gigabyte.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Using OSGeo Live In MSc Teaching

Big Data in the Earth sciences, the Tera- to Exabyte archives, mostly are made up from coverage data whereby the term "coverage", according to ISO and OGC, is defined as the digital representation of some space-time varying phenomenon. Common examples include 1-D sensor timeseries, 2-D remote sensing imagery, 3D x/y/t image timeseries and x/y/z geology data, and 4-D x/y/z/t atmosphere and ocean data. Analytics on such data requires on-demand processing of sometimes significant complexity, such as getting the Fourier transform of satellite images. As network bandwidth limits prohibit transfer of such Big Data it is indispensable to devise protocols allowing clients to task flexible and fast processing on the server. The EarthServer initiative, funded by EU FP7 eInfrastructures, unites 11 partners from computer and earth sciences to establish Big Earth Data Analytics. One key ingredient is flexibility for users to ask what they want, not impeded and complicated by system internals. The EarthServer answer to this is to use high-level query languages; these have proven tremendously successful on tabular and XML data, and we extend them with a central geo data structure, multi-dimensional arrays. A second key ingredient is scalability. Without any doubt, scalability ultimately can only be achieved through parallelization. In the past, parallelizing code has been done at compile time and usually with manual intervention. The EarthServer approach is to perform a semantic-based dynamic distribution of queries fragments based on networks optimization and further criteria. The EarthServer platform is comprised by rasdaman, an Array DBMS enabling efficient storage and retrieval of any-size, any-type multi-dimensional raster data. In the project, rasdaman is being extended with several functionality and scalability features, including: support for irregular grids and general meshes; in-situ retrieval (evaluation of database queries on existing archive structures, avoiding data import and, hence, duplication); the aforementioned distributed query processing. Additionally, Web clients for multi-dimensional data visualization are being established. Client/server interfaces are strictly based on OGC and W3C standards, in particular the Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS) which defines a high-level raster query language. We present the EarthServer project with its vision and approaches, relate it to the current state of standardization, and demonstrate it by way of large-scale data centers and their services using rasdaman.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Disconnected Geospatial Mobile & Open Source 5 Rules To Success?

We present the challenges of building a disconnected geospatial mobile solution and devise five simple rules for the success of your app. This paper will look at the following key issues: Rule 1 Data Storage. Streaming GI data requires good bandwidth, by implementing a caching mechanism the end-user will always have access to the data for a given area. Rule 2 - Use Open Source. Free and Open Source software for GIS has evolved significantly in recent years and in some cases faster than commercial alternatives. The mobile field is a bit different and few experts are using free and open source mobile GIS, despite the good tools that exist. Rule 3 - Use Open Standards. In combination with the use of Open Source products, Open Standards can help future proof the solution. Rule 4 - Simplify User Interfaces. The time of the stylus is gone and users now expect to use their finger for driving the application. Specific attention must be paid to designing simple and clear user interfaces. Rule 5 - Implement Non native Solutions. Should separate solutions be developed for IPhone and Android? Could the answer be instead to actually develop non native solutions reducing development and maintenance costs. Armed with these rules we will look at the challenges on the road ahead to implementing your GI Mobile solution.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:58 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Cartaro - The Geospatial CMS

Cartaro is a new web mapping platform that makes the power of some of the best open source geospatial components available in a content management system (CMS). Cartaro allows to set-up and run small websites or complex web applications with maps and geodata. It is also suitable for geoportals and spatial data infrastructures whenever there is the need to get everything up and running without much individual programming. The geospatial software stack used in Cartaro consists of PostGIS, GeoServer, GeoWebCache and OpenLayers. The whole stack is managed from within the CMS Drupal. The geospatial components bring professional aspects of geodata management into the CMS. This is namely the ability to persist data as true geometries, thus allowing for complex and fast queries and analyses. It does also mean supporting a whole range of data formats and the most relevant OGC standards. For the latter Cartaro can extend the handling of user roles and permissions, which already exists in Drupal, to define fully granular read and write permissions for the web services, too. In the presentation we will first explain our basic motivation behind Cartaro: that is bringing geospatial functionality to the huge community of CMS developers and users. This community, which is of course much larger than the classical FOSS4G community, has a great potential to make more and better use of geodata than it was possible with most existing tools. We will then demonstrate how far the integration with the CMS reaches and present the Drupal user interface that allows to configure most features of Cartaro. We will show how to create, edit and map geospatial content with Cartaro and we will demonstrate the publication of this content as an OGC web service. We will also go into some details concerning the architecture of Cartaro and explain how we tackled specific problems. A glimpse of the some use cases will demonstrate the real potential of Cartaro. It will also show how the focus and functionality of a Cartaro based application can be extended with the installation of any of the Drupal modules that exist for almost every task one could imagine. The presentation will close with the future perspectives for Cartaro. From a technical point of view this includes the roadmap for the next months. But it also includes a discussion of our ideas about Cartaro's role as self-supporting bridge between the geo and not-so-geo world of open source software.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Gestural Interaction With Spatiotemporal Linked Open Data

Exploring complex spatiotemporal data can be very challenging for non-experts. Recently, gestural interaction has emerged as a promising option, which has been successfully applied to various domains, including simple map control. In this paper, we investigate whether gestures can be used to enable non-experts to explore and understand complex spatiotemporal phenomena. In this case study we made use of large amounts of Linked Open Data about the deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest and related ecological, economical and social factors. The results of our study indicate that people of all ages can easily learn gestures and successfully use them to explore the visualized and aggregated spatiotemporal data about the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
49:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

FOSS4G13 Keynote QGIS 2.0

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:30 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

GraphGIS, Bringing Spatial Functionalities To NoSQL Graph Databases

Driven by the major players in of the Web like Google, Facebook, Twitter, NoSQL databases quickly gained real legitimacy in handling important data volumetry. With a first concept of key-value, NoSQL databases have quickly evolve to meet a recurring relationships between entities or documents. Graph / document paradigm provides flexibility that facilitates the representation of the real world. Beyond the representation of information of social networks, this data model fits very well to the problem of Geo Information, its variety of data models and the interconnections between them. The emergence of cloud computing and the needs driven by the Semantic Web have led publishers of geospatial solutions to consider other ways than those currently used to store and process GIS information. It is in this perspective that Geomatys has developed GraphGIS, a spatial cartridge for OrientDB, the Graph oriented NoSQL database. This solution provides support of geographic Vector, Raster and Sensor data, in multiple dimensions and their associated metadata.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

FOSS4G In Large-scale Projects

The presentation covers experiences and challenges encountered during the implementation of the Kosovo Spatial Data Infrastructure. The SDI consists of GeoPortal, Cadaster and Land Information System and the Address Register, all implemented on the FOSS stack and interconnected via OGC services.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

GIS Is Not Dead, It's Coming For You And It's Been Drinking JavaScript

This talk will discuss several super kick-ass ways that JavaScript and the web have re-shaped GIS and are changing how we visualize, analyze and share geospatial data with each other and the world. GIS is dead? No, it’s not, and it’s coming to find you and spatially kick your ass with a big bag of JavaScript. The world changes fast (hello, Internet). Yet, our industry (map making in one form or another) is stuck, and has generally shown itself to be slow to react to new ideas and paradigms that grow rapidly in other spaces. But there is still hope! GIS is coming back, and it’s being re-tooled with lots of shiny new software and geo-weapons. It’s going to make an assault on all of our previous notions of its old self. Of course this new and shiny GIS resembles its former self in many ways, it's also full many new ideas about how we experience maps and data on the web. As we witness a massive resurgence in JavaScript (hello D3 & node.js), and more emphasis placed on the web in general, we see that there are actually still large holes that should be filled the geo-spatial stack. New waves of JavaScript developers have, and will continue to fill these gaps. This talk will discuss several super kick-ass ways that JavaScript and the web have re-shaped GIS and are changing how we visualize, analyze and share geospatial data with each other and the world.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Machine Learning For Remote Sensing : Orfeo ToolBox Meets OpenCV

Orfeo ToolBox is an open-source library developed by CNES in the frame of the Orfeo program since 2006, which aimed at preparing institutional and scientific users to the use of the Very High Resolution optical imagery delivered by the Pleiades satellites. It is written in C++ on top of ITK, a medical imagery toolkit, and relies on many other open-source libraries such as GDAL or OSSIM. The OTB aims at providing generic means of pre-processing and information extraction from optical satellites imagery. In this talk, we will focus on recent advances in the machine learning functionality allowing to use the full extent of OpenCV algorithms. Historically, supervised classification of satellite images with OTB mainly relies on libSVM. The Orfeo ToolBox provides tools to train the SVM algorithm from images and raster or vector training areas, to use a trained SVM algorithm to classify satellite images of arbitrary size in a multithreaded way, and to estimate the accuracy of the classification. The SVM algorithm has also been used for other applications such as change detection or object detection. But even if it is one of the most used function of the OTB, the supervised classification function did not offer a single alternative to the SVM algorithm. However, the open-source world offers plenty of implementations of state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms. For instance OpenCV, a computer vision C++ library distributed under the BSD licence, includes a statistical machine learning module that contains no less than height different algorithms (including SVM). We therefore created an API to represent a generic machine learning algorithm. This API can then be specialized to encapsulate a given algorithm implementation. The machine learning algorithm API assumes very few properties for such algorithms. A method has to be specialized to train the algorithm from a samples vector and a set of target labels or values, and another to predict labels or values from a samples vector. Thanks to templating, these methods handle both classification and regression. Two other methods are in charge of saving and loading back the parameters from training. File format for saving is left to the underlying implementation, and the load method is expected to return a success flag. This success flag is used in a factory pattern, designed to be able to seamlessly instantiate the appropriate machine learning algorithm specialization upon file reading. It is therefore not necessary to know which algorithms the trained parameters files refer to. This new set of classes has been embedded into a new OTB application. Its purpose is to train one of the machine learning algorithm from a set of images and GIS file describing training areas, and output the trained parameters file. Another application is in charge of reading back this file and applying the classification algorithm to a given image. With these two tools, it is very easy to train different algorithms against the same dataset, evaluate them with the help of another application which can compute confusion matrix and classification performances measurement so as to choose one or several best algorithm along with their parameters. The resulting classification maps could then be combined into a more robust one using yet another OTB application, using classes majority voting or Dempster-Shafer combination. Our perspectives for using and improving this new API are manyfold. First, we would like to investigate further the use of the regression mode. We also would like to investigate the performances of the new machine learning algorithms for other tasks achievable with OTB, such as object detection for instance. Last, we would like to evolve the API so as to export any confidence or quality indices an algorithm can output regarding its predictions. This would open the way to the implementation of new active learning tools.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Mapbender3 - Create Your Own Geoportal Web Application And Service Repository

Mapbender3 is a client framework for spatial data infrastructures. It provides web based interfaces for displaying, navigating and interacting with OGC compliant services. Mapbender3 has a modern and user-friendly administration web interface to do all the work without writing a single line of code. Mapbender3 helps you to set up a repository for your OWS Services and to create indivdual application for different user needs. The software is is based on the PHP framework Symfony2 and integrates OpenLayers, MapQuery and JQuery. The Mapbender3 framework provides authentication and authorization services, OWS Proxy functionality, management interfaces for user, group and service administration. In the presentation we will have a look at some Mapbender3 solutions and find out how powerful Mapbender3 is! You will see how easy it is to publish your own application.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A New Zealand Case Study: Open Source, Open Standards, Open Data

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Epidemiology With An Open Source WebGIS Platform

We present a statistical WebGIS platform integrating visualization tools and statistical functions for epidemiological studies, entirely based on Open Source technologies. An application for cancer mapping and environmental cancer studies is the Cancer Atlas (CA-TN), the GeoICT platform of the Cancer Registry of Trentino (Italy).
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:42 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A Cellular Automata Land-Use Model For The R Software Environment

A cellular automata model of land-use change developed in the free and open source software environment R is presented. The advantages offered by R as a development environment for a CA land-use model are evaluated, and the pros and cons of the approach employed are discussed in depth with reference to commercial alternatives.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

An Open Source Analysis Toolbox For Street Network Comparison

This paper presents a novel open source toolbox for street network comparison based on the Sextante geoprocessing framework for the open source Geographic Information System Quantum GIS (QGIS). In the spirit of open science, the tool- box enables researchers worldwide to assess the quality of street networks such as OpenStreetMap (OSM) by calculating key performance indicators commonly used in street network comparison studies. Additionally, we suggest two new perfor- mance indicators for turn restriction and one-way street comparisons specifically aimed at testing street network quality for routing. We demonstrate the use of this toolbox by comparing OSM and the official Austrian reference graph “Graph Integration Platform” (GIP) in the greater Vienna region.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
36:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

GDAL/OGR Project Status

An overview of the capabilities of the GDAL/OGR (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library) project will be covered, followed by a focus on new developments in the last two years and future directions for the project.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:25 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

ESA User Services Powered By Open Source

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

PyModis: The Python Library For MODIS Data

pyModis library is a Python library to work with MODIS sensor satellite data. It was originally developed as an interface to download MODIS data from the NASA FTP server but it has grown into a powerful library which also offers further operations on the data. pyModis has several features: - it supports downloading of large numbers of original MODIS HDF/XML files. This is ideal for the automated continuous updating of a local archive through a cron job; - it can parse the XML file to obtain metadata information about the related HDF files; - it can convert a HDF MODIS file to GEOTIFF format; - it can create a mosaic of several MODIS tiles to obtain large coverages including the creation of the merged XML metadata file with information of all tiles used in this mosaic. For format conversion and mosaicing the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) is required, because at time MRT is the best free and open source software to manage original MODIS data and convert them into a different projection system or format while taking care of the special features of the original Sinusoidal projection. pyModis is composed of three modules: - downmodis.py contains a class downModis used to download MODIS data, it requires a “password” for the FTP transfer (usually your email address) and a path where to store the downloaded data. Other parameters are optional, such as the date range or the MODIS product to be downloaded; - parsemodis.py contains two classes, parseModis that parses metadata of a HDF file returning all useful information. It has also the capability to create a configuration file for MRT; the other class is parseModisMulti, it reads metadata of several HDF files, hence it is used to create the XML file for a mosaic. This class is also able to return the bounding box of all the tiles; - convertmodis.py is the module to do some simple operations on the original HDF files such as reprojection. It contains three classes and all of them require the MRT software to be installed. convertModis converts HDF files to GeoTIFF format; createMosaic creates a mosaic from several MODIS HDF files into a single HDF file; and processMosaic converts the raw data of MODIS using swath2grid from MRT-Swath. In pyModis the user can also find five command line tools to easily work with pyModis library: - modis download.py is the tool to download data, - modis parse.py reads metadata of a HDF file, prints information or writes them to a file, - modis multiparse.py reads metadata of several HDF files and prints bounding box or writes the MODIS XML metadata for a mosaic, - modis mosaic.py creates a HDF mosaic from several HDF files, - modis convert.py converts MODIS data to GeoTIFF or other formats and as well as different projection reference systems. During the presentation all these topics will be discussed and illustrated along with more information about the future of pyModis and the tools for the community (how to contribute or how to report a bug or an enhancement).
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

The Geodata Agency's Data Distribution Platform

Digital distribution of geodata makes it possible to improve the efficiency and accuracy of our professional users' data collections on an ongoing basis. The Agency's Digital Map Supply is a national infrastructure to distribute geospatial data to all kind of users. Subscribers to the Digital Map Supply receive their geodata via web services, eliminating shipping time and resources. All services are based on OGC standards e.g. WFS, WMTS, WMS and WCS. Furthermore the Digital Map Supply exposes a range of REST and SOAP services for geocoding, address searches etc. As part of the common public-sector eGOVERNMENT strategy 2011-2015, the government and Local Government Denmark have agreed on a basic data programme. The programme contains a number of specific improvements and initiatives in public-sector basic data, which will underpin greater efficiency and growth. The Digital Map Supply is the infrastructure that is used to supply the geospatial data to public agencies, end users, private companies etc. Furthermore the Digital Map Supply also supports a number of INSPIRE compliant services that The Geodata Agency is responsible of - such as a cadastral WFS. The presentation will show the architecture behind the Digital Map Supply including the number of open source components such as PostGIS, MapServer, GeoWebCache and GeoServer. The Digital Map Supply has been in service for more than ten years and the architecture has evolved during that time moving from commercial software to open source software. Moreover the presentation will outline the future of the Digital Map Supply including the migration to a new, common National distribution platform for all common public-sector data.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:38 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

The Importance Of Open Source Geospatial Labs In Widening Geospatial Education Worldwide

The importance of Open Source Geospatial Labs in widening Geospatial education worldwide Suchith Anand, University of Nottingham, UK Charlie Schweik, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA Helena Mitasova, North Carolina State University Maria Antonia Brovelli, Politecnico di Milano, Italy Serena Cotezee, University of Pretoria, South Africa Phil Davis, GeoTech Center, Delmar College, USA Patrick Hogan, NASA, USA Raphael Moreno, University of Colorado, Denver, USA Jeremy Morley, University of Nottingham, UK Although there has been tremendous growth in geospatial science over the last decade, the number of universities offering teaching in geospatial science in developing countries is very low. There are number of factors for this including high cost of software, lack of trained staff etc. But with the advent and maturity of free and open source geospatial software many universities in developing countries across the world will be establishing courses in geospatial science in the next few years. It was with this bigger mission in mind that in Sep 2011, the Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) and the International Cartographic Association (ICA) signed an MoU with the aim of developing on a global basis collaboration opportunities for academia, industry and government organizations in open source GIS software and data. Within a span of one year, we now have established labs across the planet in 6 continents . We have now grown to 20 research labs across the world (6 in Europe, 3 in North America, 3 in South America, 4 in Asia, 3 in Africa and 1 in Australia). The three main aims of the ICA-OSGeo Lab Network are to provide expertise and support for the establishment of Open Source Geospatial Laboratories and Research Centers across the world for supporting development of open-source geospatial software technologies, training and expertise ; to provide support for building-up and supporting development of open source GIS training materials; to enable development of collaboration opportunities for academia, industry and government organizations in open source GIS for the purpose of creating a sustainable ecosystem for open source GIS globally. The availability of free and open source GIS will make possible for large number of universities especially in developing countries to also start courses in geospatial science. This will in true sense bring down the entry barrier for many students especially in developing countries to learn GIS. The OSGeo.org’s education and curriculum committee has a significant history of collaboration and established significant social capital among the network of participants. but up until now, we have only been able to achieve collaboration in the form of individual posts of metadata and links to educational material [2]. With the emergence of this lab network model, coupled with the right incentives, we are confident that this network can do more collectively on the education front, and we have not yet formed closer collaborative ties in the area of open geospatial application and research. Recently the authors listed above have been collaborating on a grant proposal to establish a new effort for this open geospatial lab network that mimics open source software collaboration and that includes three key components: (1) a coordinated teaching program; (2) a repository and a system for the management of new derivatives; and (3) a organized cross-node research program focusing on applications of open geospatial technologies to support local governance and management in several key environmental management areas. In this presentation, we will describe elements of this proposal, partly in an effort to encourage others at FOSS4G to consider joining in the effort, and to solicit other collaborative ideas from the audience.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

The Right Approach: How Toscana Is Migrating To GFOSS

The Tuscany Regional Administration had a rather usual proprietary GIS infrastructure (ArcIMS, Oracle, ArcGIS). They started migrating to Open Source GIS with an integrated approach, both on the sever side (PostGIS, MapServer, Geonetworks) and on the client side (Quantum GIS, GRASS), providing also training to hundreds of their technicians. What makes this experience particularly interesting is the fact that they worked form the onset in very close contact with the community, requiring that the code developed for them was generalized, and pushed to main source code. This seemed more cumbersome at first, having to coordinate with several other developers, and not having functions closely fit to their specific needs, but the superiority of this approach become quickly evident, as several functions were further improved and maintained by third parties. Among the most notable achievements were much improved topology support in PostGIS, SLD support in QGIS, and much more. We advise other administrations and enterprises to avoid the temptation of working in isolation, and simply using FOSS4G, maybe tailoring it locally, without contributing back, as this approach is short-lived, and less successful in the long term.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Tiles And More - Deegree Freshly Implements WMTS

In 2013, a new service type joined the deegree family - the deegree Web Map Tile Service. This deegree service implements the OGC WMTS 1.0.0 specification and is going to be the OGC reference implementation for this specification. Both, the OGC WMTS test suite and deegree's candidate reference implementation have been developed within the OGC OWS-9 initiative. The intention for implementing WMTS was that deegree had no clear strategy to handle big raster data. As a result, one of the advantages of deegree WMTS is the performant handling of big raster data - such as aerial images - and providing it through a standard-compliant interface. Additionally there is advanced support for using other web services based on OGC WMS and WMTS such as GeoServer, GeoWebCache and Mapserver as datasource for deegree's tiling API, which is the underlying data access layer of the WMTS. As a key feature deegree is capable of proxying FeatureInfo output from those remote services. The presentation will give an overview about deegree WMTS and all its capabilities, especially regarding the interfaces with other OSGeo components.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

An Introduction To Open Source Geospatial

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Building Catastrophe Models With Open Data And Open Software

A catastrophe model is a tool/technique which estimates the potential loss of property and life following a major catastrophic event. Different types of events or perils are modelled including; windstorm, earthquake, flood, and storm surge. ELEMENTS is the in-house catastrophe modelling software which is developed by Impact Forecasting, part of Aon Benfield Analytics. Behind the software are models for a wide range of different event and peril types across many countries and regions of the world. To develop the different components of the catastrophe model, Impact Forecasting use a variety of proprietary and open solutions. Open Data sources such as OpenStreetMap, SRTM, CORINE land cover datasets are used, amongst others. The open-source programming language, Python, is also used extensively to create hazard footprints and files needed for the catastrophe model. The use of Open Source software and Open Data supplemented with other available proprietary data sources allow Impact Forecasting to build more flexible and transparent catastrophe models.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

CDM & TDS Data Server: Earth & Ocean Sciences Meet GIS

Different geoscience disciplines have developed sophisticated domain-specific cyber infrastructures for data storage, manipulation, and visualization. NetCDF, HDF, and GRIB are multi-dimensional array-based data formats widely used in meteorology and oceanography. However, these formats are not fully compatible with the visualization and manipulation tools supported by Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which caters to the discrete vector features and 2D raster formats commonly used in the geography, hydrology, and cartography. By providing a higher level of abstraction and enabling spatial, rather than indexed, data access, the Unidata Common Data Model (CDM) facilitates integration of NetCDF, HDF, and GRIB data into GIS tools, fostering interdisciplinary communication. The THREDDS Data Server (TDS) utilizes the CDM to work efficiently with large, dynamic collections of observational and model data. The TDS organizes these collections into unified, logical datasets, simplifying their access and dissemination. TDS datasets are exposed via the WMS and WCS Open Geospatial Consortium specifications, with support for time and elevation standard dimensions. Alternatively, TDS datasets are accessible through specialized web services that provide subsetting capabilities. The NetCDF Subset Service allows for spatial subsetting, while OpenDAP subsets by index. Finally, metadata discovery systems such as Geoportal and GI-CAT harvest TDS catalog metadata. The TDS ncISO service also serves catalog metadata directly as ISO documents, enabling text searches and exposing a CSW interface on TDS instances through these discovery systems. The CDM & TDS are OpenSource projects (https://github.com/Unidata/thredds) with strong community support. Members have contributed key features, including the ncISO and WMS implementations. Moreover, many interdisciplinary Web-GIS applications have already been successfully developed combining TDS web services with resources from other spatial data infrastructures. Coupled with Unidata's governing committees, the projects provide a unique framework that establishes quality standards and ensures that development meets community needs
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A Toe In The Water - Using Open Source Software To Support Catchment Management Planning

Integrated river catchment management planning seeks to balance many demands on the water and land, to protect water resources and ecology for the benefit of the economy, society and the natural world. Third sector organisations have a key role in this process - providing both the practical delivery of river restoration work, and an 'honest broker' role between government, private sector interests and local communities, to try and balance these often conflicting interests in a sustainable catchment plan. However, access to the complex evidence, software models and datasets, which are required for strategic environmental management planning, can be difficult for the third sector and community groups, due to reasons such as cost, licensing restrictions or technical capability. As the umbrella organisation of the rivers trusts movement in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, The Rivers Trust has been exploring the potential for open source software and datasets to improve the sharing of information and evidence with a range of stakeholders in the catchment management planning process. A web GIS application for identifying and prioritising barriers to migratory fish (based on Geoserver) and an application to identify sources of diffuse sediment pollution (built on SAGA GIS) will be demonstrated, and plans for future development of open source tools and data sharing is discussed.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A New GIS Toolbox For Integrating Massive Heterogeneous GIS Data For Land Use Change Analysis

Agricultural land use in Germany and related impacts on the environment and the use of natural resources are key research topics at the Thünen-Institute of Rural Studies. As spatial context is essential for the analysis of causal connections, GIS data regarding all necessary information was gathered during different research projects and prepared for processing in a database. In particular, the Integrated Administration and Control System, which was available for certain project purposes for several Federal Laender and years, serves as a very detailed data source for agricultural land use. We use different Open Source GIS software like PostgreSQL/PostGIS, GRASS and QuantumGIS for geoprocessing, supplemented with the proprietary ESRI product ArcGIS. After introducing the used input data and the general processing approach, this paper presents a selection of geoprocessing routines for which Open Source GIS software was used. As an exemplary 'use case' for the conclusions from the consecutive statistical analysis, we summarize impacts of increased biogas production on agricultural land use change highlighting the trend in biogas maize cultivation and the conversion of permanent grassland to agricultural cropland.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Open Geospatial Data And Services Publication On The Cloud: The INGEOCLOUDS Open Source Approach

The cloud can be used as an infrastructure, as a platform or as a (desktop) software replacement according to the three different paradigms that it supports (IaaS, PaaS and SaaS). On the other hand at the moment more and more applications are using the cloud as their backend since it promises (unlimited) scalability and elasticity in terms of storage and computing power. In the open source geospatial world a lot of effort has been invested in developing excellent software that can be used to store, manage, visualize and publish on the web geospatial data and services. But when it comes to the cloud those offerings are not always readily available since the software, we all build, does not scale in a way that can take advantage of the cloud. In that respect we worked towards providing scalability and elasticity capabilities for the storage, querying and visualization of geospatial data based on existing open source solutions like the Mapserver, PostGIS, Apache and so on. We also worked on the lower part of the software stack so that we can build an elastic file system for storing geospatial data. So we are in the process of offering a fully open source solution that can take advantage of the cloud and its properties. Moreover we have coupled this solution with support for publishing anyone’s geospatial data as Linked Open Data so that they can be readily combined with other data on the web. In that respect we are using an open source SPARQL endpoint (Virtuoso) that allows us to store geospatially enabled information given that a suitable conceptual model will be provided described in RDF. Thus we allow for seamless integration of published data on the semantic web and we provide the necessary services for integrating this kind of offering in other applications in the future. Additionally we identified an emerging need to allow end users to publish their own data and create dynamically their own customized services on the cloud. Thus we exploit cloud’s “unlimited” storage capabilities to allow end users to publish their own data (as long as it is cost effective, too), combine them with existing data and create their own WMS/WFS customized services and publish them on the web. This has a great value-added for the users since they can actually publish their own maps. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of our technical solution by building and offering a set of advanced geophysical services through the platform. These services include a service for creating shakemaps (maps the visualize the effects caused by an earthquake to the environment), predicting landslides (providing maps assessing the possibility of landslides) and handling pollution information in ground waters. In conclusion, we offer an open source software stack that is based on existing open source software and extends it as needed in order to take to the most possible advantage of the properties of the cloud. We have tried to keep the software agnostic for the specific cloud and its capabilities. The work is carried out within the INGEOCLOUDS FP7 Project, co-funded by the EU, and with the participation of companies (AKKA technologies, France), research centers (CNR, Italy and FORTH, Greece) and data providers like geological surveys (GEUS, Denmark; GEO-ZS, Slovenia; BRGM, France and EKBAA, Greece) and earthquake research institutes (EPPO, Greece).
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

OpenWIS Opensource Software

OpenWIS OpenSource Software The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has been working for several years towards upgrading its global infrastructure to support all of its international programmes of work, both operational and research-based, to collect, share and disseminate information. The new infrastructure is called the WIS ( WMO Information System). It identifies three top level functions, namely: • GISC: Global Information System Centre; • DCPC: Data Collection and Production Centre; • NC: National Centre. Météo-France, the UK Met Office, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, the Korean Meteorological Administration and Meteo France International have developed the OpenWIS software, coupled with their existing systems, to perform the three functions required by the WMO Information System; that is, GISC, DCPC and NC. Based on opensource bricks, with GeoNetwork, OpenAM, JBoss, Apache, Solr and PostGreSQL, OpenWIS is going to become opensource. Beyond the WIS requirements, the OpenWIS consortium is building new functionalities for OpenWIS that will fit the OGC (OpenGeospatial Consortium) and INSPIRE (European directive) aspects, with standards OGC interfaces, a portal providing the viewer function with the discovery, search and request possibilities, and in a short future the billing and the transformation services. The current functional components of OpenWIS are: • Data Service and its cache of essential data • Metadata Service (ISO19115 catalogue synchronised with OAI-PMH protocol) • Security Service • Monitoring and Control • Portal (Discovery, Search, Browse, Request, Subscription) Météo France operates various dissemination tools. OpenWIS provide a generic interface that Météo France has adapted, covering requests for dissemination and their monitoring. OpenWIS interacts with data sources to respond to ad hoc or periodic subscription requests either directly via harness connections or relying on SOA OGC infrastructure. The new challenge of the consortium is to share the opensource model and expand membership beyond the founding members. The reflexion within the consortium enables to give some trends: • A steering committee for the integration of new functionalities (spontaneous or not) • One or two licences (the portal and the metadata component inheriting of the GeoNetwork licence) • A strong but reduced team for the initial developpement (MetOffice and Meteo France) • Git for the management of versioning and integration • The will to put the soft on the shelves of the World Meteorological Organisation • Entrance in the opensource area by the end of 2013
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

The Business Case For Open Standards

The use of open standards has brought considerable business value to Ordnance Survey, Great Britain’s national mapping authority. Ordnance Survey participates in the development process for open standards in international standards bodies and is an early adopter of many open standards. The use of open standards has enabled Ordnance Survey to future proof internal information systems, foster innovation within new product development and better serve data to its customers. The use of open standards has brought considerable business value to Ordnance Survey, Great Britain’s national mapping authority. Ordnance Survey participates in the development process for open standards in international standards bodies and is an early adopter of many open standards. The use of open standards has enabled Ordnance Survey to future proof internal information systems, foster innovation within new product development and better serve data to its customers.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Open Source Software For Land Cover Mapping From Remote Sensing Data

Open source software is well established for basic raster and vector data processing, with the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) as one of the most well known tools. Its utilities and application programming interface (API) have become a common standard for data format conversion, reprojection, spatial and spectral subsetting. With its command line interface utilities, GDAL is better suited for the automatic processing of very large amounts of data and for repetitive processing tasks than most of its commercial counterparts. Though GDAL provides an excellent API on which more advanced image processing tasks can be built, not all users have the time or programming skills to get involved such development. In particular within the remote sensing user community, there is a large interest in machine learning techniques applied to remote sensing data.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

OpenLayers 3 - How To Successfully Run A Crowdfunding Campaign For An OSS Project

The impressive list of OSGeo Projects [1] show the necessity to develop OpenSource software. Behind all lines of code, there is the work of one developer. And, in our capitalist world, work means money. This presentation will underline the challenges of the crowdfunding effort organized for the development of the next major release of OpenLayers 3. OpenLayers is one of the most famous OSGeo library and is widely used for the development of web mapping applications. Its development started in 2007. In 2012, it was clear for the developers that the current release was at the end of its life. The emergence of new technologies implied to create a complete new libraries based on these new technologies. As usual in the OpenSource world, some developers started this work in the middle of 2012. Since a complete rewrite was required, it appeared clearly that the work needed to obtain a library that would allow the migration to the new release was huge. It was estimated to 2’500 hours of work. At this time, swisstopo planned a migration of its web mapping applications. swisstopo decided to use the future release of OpenLayers, which was only a very first prototype. In order to benefit of the advantages of OpenSource developments made by a community, it was not possible for swisstopo to simply mandate a company for the development of this library. The commitment of the OpenLayers community and its committers/developers was needed. So, in order to speed up the development process, swisstopo decided to invest a substantial amount of money and to organize a crowdfunding effort together with companies active in the OpenLayers development scene. Several financement channels were used: micro fundings from individuals and more important fundings from companies and administrations. This presentation will describe the main problems and challenges faced during this crowdfunding effort and how they have been solved. Here is a list of these problems and challenges: - Some key actors had to be convinced to donate in order to convince others to follow the movement. It is important that one or two big players make the first donations. And, since the money is managed by the higher manager, a lot of energy has been put in explaining how an OpenSource community works. The OpenSource development model is still not very well known and the higher management often think that a normal contract with one company is the best way to develop softwares. - The general objective was to be clear and strong enough in order to convince individuals, companies or administrations to invest on something that didn’t exist. - The financial capacities of individuals, companies or administrations are not the same. But all are part of the OpenLayers community. It was important to be able to handle donations of some dollars to some thousand of dollars. - OpenLayers is an OpenSource community, but is not a legal entity. It’s therefore not possible to make a contract with OpenLayers. In order to solve that, the main companies of the OpenLayers development scene decided to create an association in order to simplify the administrative aspects. - The commitments and the resources of the OpenLayers committers was needed in order to ensure that the library could be developed in a short time frame and with the necessary level of quality. - A worldwide communication concept has to be put in place in order to reach all potential crowdfunders. And this only with a few persons working partially on this project. - An organization had to be put in place in order to coordinate the work of persons located all around the world. But at the end, the result is here: more than 350’000 USD have been found and the development of OpenLayers 3 is a reality. And everyone can now benefit of a modern, performant and 2D/3D web mapping library, thanks to all crowdfunders and developers !!!
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:58 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Mobile Development With OpenLayers, Sencha Touch And PhoneGap

We will discuss some of the experiences we (Camptocamp and OpenGeo) had whilst developing several mobile applications with OpenLayers 2 in combination with Sencha Touch. Some applications also used PhoneGap to create real apps. Among the topics that will be discussed: -approaches for feature selection -the OpenLayers tile manager -offline tiles (async layer) with PhoneGap
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Mappy-ng Open Source

Mappy is an online mapping company based in France and fully-owned by Solocal Group (PagesJaunes). Mappy was the pioneer in online mapping in France, and holds a significant market share in France and Belgium (about 10 millions monthly users). The company has developed an home-made LBS platform since 1998. The mapping service delivers 100 millions tiles a day. At the beginning of 2012, Mappy decided to redesign its core mapping service to meet new business challenges. The company needed a more standard and open source solution. Developers and product managers have fallen in love with Mapnik (some for code and performance, others for the map display quality). The team made the decision to build the new mapping service around Mapnik and others open source tools like PostGIS. The project was challenging : we switched from a MSSqlServer database/home made mapping engine/Windows architecture to a postgis database/mapnik engine/Linux one. During the development, we've seen and appreciated the energy around Mapnik and we started to gradually dive into code and contribute to some features. This talk will present a feedback on the overhaul : the functional and technical challenges, the decision to contribute to Mapnik project, the release of this service, its performance and the future roadmap.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
17:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Old Maps Online And Georeferencer

Hundreds of thousands of historical maps have now been scanned and made available on-line by libraries around the world, and this has been a great boon to anyone interested in the history of cartography. Despite this fact it is hard to find scanned maps covering area of interest in the large number of online catalogs, library systems and web presentations on the web. The traditional fulltext search engines, such as Google, is failing to index the scanned maps properly. Old Maps Online is a search system tailored just for historical maps. Pick a location on a world map, or type in a place-name, narrow the search by selecting a date range. A listing of all possible maps covering that location appears, ordered by best geographical match. Select a map, click on the link and you go directly to view the map on the original library’s website. You don’t need to know who holds the map, just where in the world you want to look at. This system is designed to complement rather than compete with libraries' own search interfaces. The system is powered by the enhanced version of the MapRank Search technology and indexes over 130.000 scanned high-resolution maps already. Many major collections in the US, UK and elsewhere have agreed to contribute: The British Library, Harvard Library, National Library of Scotland, David Rumsey Map Collection, Dutch National Archives, Moravian Library, New York Public Library, Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library, National Library of Australia, etc. Our aim is to include as many collections as possible, so map libraries and collectors are encouraged to participate. To be able to index the scanned maps geographically, we must be supplied with minimal metadata (title, creator/publisher, date, identifier, and a stable url), plus geographic coordinates for the area covered, for each map. We can suggest/provide tools you can use to create the coordinates. One of the tools is the Georeferencer online service, which allows rapid collaborative georeferencing, 3D visualization, annotation and accuracy analysis of scanned online maps directly in a web browser environment, without the need to install any software on a local computer. The online visitors can help with the metadata enrichment and georeferencing of the scanned maps - and they are motivated with competitions, rewarding, community participation and recognition during this crowdsourcing effort. The Georeferencer service is applied in several institutions such as the British Library (London), the Moravian Library (Brno), the Nationaal Archief (The Hague), the National Library of Scotland (Edinburgh), and the Institut Cartografic de Catalunya (Barcelona).
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

MapServer REST API

MapServer doesn't have any build-in administration tool. MapServer REST API has been designed to manipulate the mapfile from HTTP requests (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE) based on RESTFul URL patterns. The presentation will show the basic concepts of the API, based on GeoServer REST API, and will make a live demo of managing a mapfile content with HTTP requests.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)