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50:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

VivaCity Smart City Platform

Many big vendors are exploring the smart city concept explaining that the smart city is a city aware of the things happening in the infrastructures. Thus the vendors are pushing for a Smart Grid, Smart Metering, Smart Sensors and Smart Whatsoever. This makes the city look like a sick patient, being monitored in many ways with histograms, gauges and panels for the information to be read. In our opinion this is the most unnatural way to interact with city information. Historically the most used way to interact with citizen oriented information is the map. Even today, with the always more precise GIS tools, the map can be an important part of a city information management tool. The VivaCity Project is a platform for the data-driven smart city. The core of the platform consists of a map- based view of the city itself, with all the possible cartographic open data made available by the governance. Beyond that, various apps can contribute in a smart manner through a set of plugins and entry-points for various views of the city, enabling a deep and complex interaction with the city itself. This system is self-sustaining, considering that the city already contains its monitors, which are the citizens. They just need two sets of tools: a visualization tool enabling the citizens to understand what is being done at a given time, and a tool to express opinions, problems and proposals to the governance. Considering that an overly generic tool loses its meaning because it has no real target, the interaction with the governance is delegated to function-specific or target-specific apps sharing a common API. This way both governance and citizen gain benefits, having both sides creating new data all the time and interconnecting information from the city and its inhabitants: governance has the ability make decisions based on real-time citizen-driven data, while citizens have the opportunity to create new services using the provided data. Figure 1 - Part of the VivaCity Smart City Interface For instance, the APIs offered to external apps are aimed to the following areas of interest: Politics, political decisions Maintenance • • • • • • • • • Security City Info, Touristic, Cultural information Management, urbanistic information Urban events, Urban Acupuncture, social analysis Emergency Management, Emergency information aggregation from the many sources available Economic, Managerial information Environmental, Energy usage information The data shown in the interface is the sum and interpretation of the data provided by the local governments through open data, or applications created by third parties like OpenMunicipio in Italy, the OpenSpending platform by OKFN or even simply mash-ups with complex datasources, like the USGS earthquake map, or the various regional APIs for simple services or any other app enabling the citizen to participate actively to the activity of his government. Using the platform in different cities enables a normalization of the services offered by the cities, and the direct comparison and interconnection of cities through a distributed API supporting the governance to empower policies and improve citizens’ lifes.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

TileServer: Hosting Map Tiles And MBTiles

OpenGIS Web Map Tiling Service (WMTS) is becoming the standard used for distributing raster maps to the web and mobile applications, cell-phones, tablets as well as desktop software. Practically all popular desktop GIS products now support this standard as well, including ESRI ArcGIS for Desktop, open-source Quantum GIS (qgis) and uDig, etc. The TileServer, a new open-source software project, is going to be demonstrated. It is able to serve maps from an ordinary web-hosting and provide an efficient OGC WMTS compliant map tile service for maps pre-rendered with MapTiler, MapTiler Cluster, GDAL2Tiles, TileMill or available in MBTiles format. The presentation will demonstrate compatibility with ArcGIS client and other desktop GIS software, with popular web APIs (such as Google Maps, MapBox, OpenLayers, Leaflet) and with mobile SDKs. We will show a complete workflow from a GeoTIFF file (Ordnance Survey OpenData) with custom spatial reference coordinate system (OSGB / EPSG:27700) to the online service (OGC WMTS) provided from an ordinary web-hosting. The software has been originally developed by Klokan Technologies GmbH (Switzerland) in cooperation with NOAA (The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA) and it has been successfully used to expose detailed aerial photos during disaster relief actions, for example on the crisis response for Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Isaac in 2012. The software was able to handle large demand from an ordinary in-house web server without any issues. The geodata were displayed in a web application for general public and provided to GIS clients for professional use - thanks to compatibility with ArcIMS. It can be easily used for serving base maps, aerial photos or any other raster geodata. It very easy to apply - just copy the project files to a PHP-enabled directory along with your map data containing metadata.json file. The online service can be easily protected with password or burned-in watermarks made during the geodata rendering. Tiles are served directly by Apache web server with mod rewrite rules as static files and therefore are very fast and with correct HTTP caching headers. The web interface and XML metadata are delivered via PHP, because it allows deployment on large number of existing web servers including variety of free web hosting providers. There is no need to install any additional software on the webserver. The mapping data can be easily served in the standardized form from in-house web servers, or from practically any standard web-hosting provider (the cheap unlimited tariffs are applicable too), and from a private cloud. The same principle can be applied on an external content distribution network (Amazon S3 / CloudFront) to serve the geodata with higher speed and reliability by automatically caching it geographically closer to your online visitors, while still paying only a few cents per transferred gigabyte.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

LIDAR In PostgreSQL With Pointcloud

How do you store massive point cloud data sets in a database for easy access, filtering and analysis? The new PointCloud extension for PostgreSQL allows LIDAR data to be loaded, filtered by spatial and attribute values, and analyzed via integration with PostGIS. We'll discuss the extension implementation, basics of loading data with PDAL, and how to use PointCloud with PostGIS to do on­the­fly LIDAR analysis inside the database.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
49:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

FOSS4G13 Keynote QGIS 2.0

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

GIS Is Not Dead, It's Coming For You And It's Been Drinking JavaScript

This talk will discuss several super kick-ass ways that JavaScript and the web have re-shaped GIS and are changing how we visualize, analyze and share geospatial data with each other and the world. GIS is dead? No, it’s not, and it’s coming to find you and spatially kick your ass with a big bag of JavaScript. The world changes fast (hello, Internet). Yet, our industry (map making in one form or another) is stuck, and has generally shown itself to be slow to react to new ideas and paradigms that grow rapidly in other spaces. But there is still hope! GIS is coming back, and it’s being re-tooled with lots of shiny new software and geo-weapons. It’s going to make an assault on all of our previous notions of its old self. Of course this new and shiny GIS resembles its former self in many ways, it's also full many new ideas about how we experience maps and data on the web. As we witness a massive resurgence in JavaScript (hello D3 & node.js), and more emphasis placed on the web in general, we see that there are actually still large holes that should be filled the geo-spatial stack. New waves of JavaScript developers have, and will continue to fill these gaps. This talk will discuss several super kick-ass ways that JavaScript and the web have re-shaped GIS and are changing how we visualize, analyze and share geospatial data with each other and the world.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

MapServer Project Status Report - Meet The Developers!

This session starts with a status report of the MapServer project, followed by an open question/answer session to provide a opportunity for users to interact with members of the MapServer project team. We will go over the main features and enhancements introduced in MapServer 6.2 and 6.4, including the addition of the new TinyOWS and MapCache components, the current and future direction of the project, and finally discuss contribution opportunities for interested developers and users. Don’t miss this chance to meet and chat face-to-face with the members of the MapServer project team!
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:04 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A New Dimension To PostGIS : 3D

Talking about 3D used to sound cool. Used to. But for real GIS use, we really need more than just playing with a globe. 3D in GIS becomes cool as soon as we have the ability to deal with full 3D spatial analysis. Just as we already have in 2D, we need functions like intersection, buffer, triangulation and more ... The GEOS library provides us 2D topological processing for years. The CGAL library could now also provide us some interesting additional 3D topological functions. As CGAL is not fully designed for GIS data models, we provide a library inbetween called SFCGAL, in charge of providing a Simple Feature API on top of CGAL. PostGIS 2.1 now allows to link PostGIS and (SF)CGAL, and already provides several exciting 3D functions (and more and more to come). This thrilling talk about PostGIS 3D will therefore focus on : - What kind of project / application needs 3D GIS analysis ? - What can we do right now with PostGIS 2.1 and (SF)CGAL ? - What we will be able to do soon with PostGIS 3D ? - Some tools used to view and manipulate 3D data (QGIS / WebGL based)
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A New Zealand Case Study: Open Source, Open Standards, Open Data

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Epidemiology With An Open Source WebGIS Platform

We present a statistical WebGIS platform integrating visualization tools and statistical functions for epidemiological studies, entirely based on Open Source technologies. An application for cancer mapping and environmental cancer studies is the Cancer Atlas (CA-TN), the GeoICT platform of the Cancer Registry of Trentino (Italy).
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

An Open Source Analysis Toolbox For Street Network Comparison

This paper presents a novel open source toolbox for street network comparison based on the Sextante geoprocessing framework for the open source Geographic Information System Quantum GIS (QGIS). In the spirit of open science, the tool- box enables researchers worldwide to assess the quality of street networks such as OpenStreetMap (OSM) by calculating key performance indicators commonly used in street network comparison studies. Additionally, we suggest two new perfor- mance indicators for turn restriction and one-way street comparisons specifically aimed at testing street network quality for routing. We demonstrate the use of this toolbox by comparing OSM and the official Austrian reference graph “Graph Integration Platform” (GIP) in the greater Vienna region.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Taming Rich GML With stETL, A Lightweight Python Framework For Geospatial ETL

Data conversion combined with model and coordinate transformation from a source to a target datastore (files, databases) is a recurring task in almost every geospatial project. This proces is often refered to as ETL (Extract Transform Load). Source and/or target geo-data formats are increasingly encoded as GML (Geography Markup Language), either as flat records, so called Simple Features, but more and more using domain-specific, object oriented OGC/ISO GML Application Schema's. GML Application Schema's are for example heavily used within the INSPIRE Data Harmonization effort in Europe. Many National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies (NMCAs) use GML-encoded datasets as their bulk format for download and exchange and via Web Feature Services (WFSs).
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:06 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

The Met Office Open Data Journey

In November 2011, the UK Met Office launched DataPoint: an Application Programming Interface (API) for the release of its Open Data, in support of the Government’s desire for increased transparency and economic growth. Starting with just a handful of users, the service has grown in data, functionality and usage. This year the we are making further developments, responding to user feedback and ensuring INSPIRE compliance. This presentation will describe the journey so far and a forecast for the future.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

The RAGLD (Rapid Assembly Of Geo-centred Linked Data) Framework

As more linked data and open data emerges a need was identified to meet a rising demand for a suite of application developers’ tools to make it easier to bring together, use and exploit these diverse data sets. RAGLD aims to create a set of tools, components and services to make it easier to develop linked Data applications. This talk will describe the RAGLD framework and examples will be given on how it can be used.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Application Development With OpenLayers 3

OpenLayers 3 is a complete rewrite based on the latest in browser technology. This talk will focus on best practices for application development with OpenLayers 3. Covering simple maps in a page, integration with popular MV* frameworks, and native-wrapped mobile apps, we'll look at strategies for building mapping functionality into your applications. OpenLayers 3 aims to provide a high performance library with a wide breadth of functionality. Come learn about how it differs from OpenLayers 2, what makes it stand apart from other alternatives, and how you can best leverage its functionality.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Building Catastrophe Models With Open Data And Open Software

A catastrophe model is a tool/technique which estimates the potential loss of property and life following a major catastrophic event. Different types of events or perils are modelled including; windstorm, earthquake, flood, and storm surge. ELEMENTS is the in-house catastrophe modelling software which is developed by Impact Forecasting, part of Aon Benfield Analytics. Behind the software are models for a wide range of different event and peril types across many countries and regions of the world. To develop the different components of the catastrophe model, Impact Forecasting use a variety of proprietary and open solutions. Open Data sources such as OpenStreetMap, SRTM, CORINE land cover datasets are used, amongst others. The open-source programming language, Python, is also used extensively to create hazard footprints and files needed for the catastrophe model. The use of Open Source software and Open Data supplemented with other available proprietary data sources allow Impact Forecasting to build more flexible and transparent catastrophe models.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A Toe In The Water - Using Open Source Software To Support Catchment Management Planning

Integrated river catchment management planning seeks to balance many demands on the water and land, to protect water resources and ecology for the benefit of the economy, society and the natural world. Third sector organisations have a key role in this process - providing both the practical delivery of river restoration work, and an 'honest broker' role between government, private sector interests and local communities, to try and balance these often conflicting interests in a sustainable catchment plan. However, access to the complex evidence, software models and datasets, which are required for strategic environmental management planning, can be difficult for the third sector and community groups, due to reasons such as cost, licensing restrictions or technical capability. As the umbrella organisation of the rivers trusts movement in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, The Rivers Trust has been exploring the potential for open source software and datasets to improve the sharing of information and evidence with a range of stakeholders in the catchment management planning process. A web GIS application for identifying and prioritising barriers to migratory fish (based on Geoserver) and an application to identify sources of diffuse sediment pollution (built on SAGA GIS) will be demonstrated, and plans for future development of open source tools and data sharing is discussed.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Analysis Of Realtime Stream Data With Anvil

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:55 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Big Data In Standardization: Can This Fly?

In geo data, a main footprint coming from Big Data stems from remote sensing, atmospheric and ocean models, and statistics data. In the strive for interoperability, standardizaiton bodies establish interface specifications for large-scale geo services. Are these standards really helpful, or do they inhibit performance? We investigate this and show both positive and negative examples, based on OGC, INSPIRE, and ISO standards relevant for scalable geo services.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Online GIS - Meet The Cloud Publication Platforms That Will Revolutionize Our Industry

Web mapping has become very exciting in the last year or two. Many new products have come onto the market that make the creation and publication of web maps easier by an order of magnitude. The demand for quick and easy web maps isn’t a new one, so why is it only now that we’re seeing products that address this need enter the market? The answer is twofold: first, cloud computing has has hugely reduced the cost of running resource hungry map servers; and, second, the open source building blocks that most of the products featured in this presentation utilise have reached the level of maturity required to build reliable, scalable products on top of them. Most of this new generation of cloud based web map publication products are indeed “standing on the shoulders of giants” and wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the tremendous work done by the open source GIS community over the last decade. This presentation will be a follow up to my free ebook released in March entitled “Online GIS - Meet the Cloud Publication Platforms that Will Revolutionize our Industry” (www.onlinegis.com), the presentation will take a closer look at the products covered in the book and particular the open source building blocks that make them possible. You no doubt are wondering is why the CEO of a web map software company would want to give a presentation that not only looks at his product but also those of his “rivals”. The short answer is that I get asked all the time what the difference is between these products and also see the same question asked many times in online forums and social media channels, so it’s obviously something that needs answering. I also don’t view most of these products as our rivals, although all of the products featured in this presentation are capable of similar end results; the steps required to achieve those results differ hugely, with each aiming to make that process as smooth as possible for a certain type of user, be it programmer, casual GIS user or GIS analyst. After this presentation you’ll have a good idea of the differences between ArcGIS Online, CartoDB, GeoCommons, GISCloud, MangoMap and Mapbox, you will also have a clearer idea of which of the products is best suited to your unique needs and requirements as well as the open source building blocks that power them. This presentation isn’t going to show you how to use these products, but it will show you what is possible with each of them and what it takes in order to achieve the best results.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Scribe: MapServer Mapfile Development Made Easy

Anyone who has tried to create great looking maps for a large dataset such as OpenStreetMap knows how daunting of a task that can be. Scribe is the solution to this painstaking task. This presentation will introduce this new way to not only edit, but mostly to manage, mapfiles. No matter how much data you have, how many mapfiles or the complexity of your symbology, it will help you sort out the essential by removing the iterative part of the process. Getting rid of all of this error prone copy-paste as well! Scribe is a python script that allows you to write a configuration file instead of a mapfile. The configuration is similar to Basemaps, but simpler to use and less verbose.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

OpenLayers 3 Showcase

OpenLayers 3 enables a huge range of new web mapping functionality. In this talk, we'll show off many of the cool features of OpenLayers 3, including: Rich interaction and animation Virtual globe integration Raster layer effects Wide-ranging data source support The talk will be light on technical details and heavy with cool demos to show you how OpenLayers 3 opens up new and exciting ways of presenting your geospatial data.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

OpenLayers 3 - How To Successfully Run A Crowdfunding Campaign For An OSS Project

The impressive list of OSGeo Projects [1] show the necessity to develop OpenSource software. Behind all lines of code, there is the work of one developer. And, in our capitalist world, work means money. This presentation will underline the challenges of the crowdfunding effort organized for the development of the next major release of OpenLayers 3. OpenLayers is one of the most famous OSGeo library and is widely used for the development of web mapping applications. Its development started in 2007. In 2012, it was clear for the developers that the current release was at the end of its life. The emergence of new technologies implied to create a complete new libraries based on these new technologies. As usual in the OpenSource world, some developers started this work in the middle of 2012. Since a complete rewrite was required, it appeared clearly that the work needed to obtain a library that would allow the migration to the new release was huge. It was estimated to 2’500 hours of work. At this time, swisstopo planned a migration of its web mapping applications. swisstopo decided to use the future release of OpenLayers, which was only a very first prototype. In order to benefit of the advantages of OpenSource developments made by a community, it was not possible for swisstopo to simply mandate a company for the development of this library. The commitment of the OpenLayers community and its committers/developers was needed. So, in order to speed up the development process, swisstopo decided to invest a substantial amount of money and to organize a crowdfunding effort together with companies active in the OpenLayers development scene. Several financement channels were used: micro fundings from individuals and more important fundings from companies and administrations. This presentation will describe the main problems and challenges faced during this crowdfunding effort and how they have been solved. Here is a list of these problems and challenges: - Some key actors had to be convinced to donate in order to convince others to follow the movement. It is important that one or two big players make the first donations. And, since the money is managed by the higher manager, a lot of energy has been put in explaining how an OpenSource community works. The OpenSource development model is still not very well known and the higher management often think that a normal contract with one company is the best way to develop softwares. - The general objective was to be clear and strong enough in order to convince individuals, companies or administrations to invest on something that didn’t exist. - The financial capacities of individuals, companies or administrations are not the same. But all are part of the OpenLayers community. It was important to be able to handle donations of some dollars to some thousand of dollars. - OpenLayers is an OpenSource community, but is not a legal entity. It’s therefore not possible to make a contract with OpenLayers. In order to solve that, the main companies of the OpenLayers development scene decided to create an association in order to simplify the administrative aspects. - The commitments and the resources of the OpenLayers committers was needed in order to ensure that the library could be developed in a short time frame and with the necessary level of quality. - A worldwide communication concept has to be put in place in order to reach all potential crowdfunders. And this only with a few persons working partially on this project. - An organization had to be put in place in order to coordinate the work of persons located all around the world. But at the end, the result is here: more than 350’000 USD have been found and the development of OpenLayers 3 is a reality. And everyone can now benefit of a modern, performant and 2D/3D web mapping library, thanks to all crowdfunders and developers !!!
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Mappy-ng Open Source

Mappy is an online mapping company based in France and fully-owned by Solocal Group (PagesJaunes). Mappy was the pioneer in online mapping in France, and holds a significant market share in France and Belgium (about 10 millions monthly users). The company has developed an home-made LBS platform since 1998. The mapping service delivers 100 millions tiles a day. At the beginning of 2012, Mappy decided to redesign its core mapping service to meet new business challenges. The company needed a more standard and open source solution. Developers and product managers have fallen in love with Mapnik (some for code and performance, others for the map display quality). The team made the decision to build the new mapping service around Mapnik and others open source tools like PostGIS. The project was challenging : we switched from a MSSqlServer database/home made mapping engine/Windows architecture to a postgis database/mapnik engine/Linux one. During the development, we've seen and appreciated the energy around Mapnik and we started to gradually dive into code and contribute to some features. This talk will present a feedback on the overhaul : the functional and technical challenges, the decision to contribute to Mapnik project, the release of this service, its performance and the future roadmap.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Migration To Open Source Database Systems

Changing data distribution from one relational database system to another should be an easy task. SQL is a standardized database language and concepts concerning spatial data is much the same through OGC standards. Still, some tasks has to be done in a slightly different manner. The Danish Geodata Agency decided to explore changing a major part of its data distribution from a commercial Oracle Spatial database to an open source PostGres/PostGIS database. A pilot project was set up to evaluate PostGIS as a productive distribution database accessed by a lot of users through open source services. Experiences were positive and the pilot system was upsized to a full scale production system. The database setup is designed to facilitate sufficient performance and ensure constantly running service. Databases and services are replicated and a master-slave relation is established between the databases to ensure immediate copying when new data are transferred from the authoritative database. A special challenge was the change-over from the old system to the new one while services were still running. New data are copied on a daily basis. Old and new system were run in parallel for a short while to be sure that the new system was stable. The change-over has mainly been done by inhouse employees, which were non-specialists in open source products. Documentation and expert service companies are available if help is needed. Experiences are positive. The Danish Geodata Agency decided to explore changing a major part of its data distribution from a commercial Oracle Spatial database to an open source PostGres/PostGIS database. A pilot project was set up to evaluate PostGIS as a productive distribution database accessed by a lot of users through open source services. Experiences were positive and the pilot system was upsized to a full scale production system.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Introduction To Location And Linked Data

A lot of data references some kind of location whether it is a place name, street name, address, postcode or some kind of coordinate. Because of this it is becoming clear that location provides an important data integration hub on the linked data web. This talk gives an introduction to linked data, and will focus on challenges around constructing linked data for geographic and spatial information. Examples will focus on work being done at Ordnance Survey and the wider UK Government. A lot of data references some kind of location whether it is a place name, street name, address, postcode or some kind of coordinate. Because of this it is becoming clear that location provides an important data integration hub on the linked data web. This talk gives an introduction to linked data, and will focus on challenges around constructing linked data for geographic and spatial information. Examples will focus on work being done at Ordnance Survey and the wider UK Government.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

FOSS4G In AWS: Choosing, Deploying And Tuning Open Source Components In AWS

This presentation will show methods of working with AWS to design, deploy and tune Open source software with an end goal to bring up various geo-oriented full stacks. This includes databases, tile renderers, geocoders, routers with all dependencies. It will cover choosing the components, the deployment posture, prototyping, designing for cloud scalability, performance benchmarking and ongoing maintenance. Most of the concepts will lend themselves well to other public or private cloud situations.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Bulk Interpolation Using the R Environment

The paper explains the development and application of a script for bulk assessment and interpolation of data in the R scripting language. In practice it is often required to analyze a large amount of spatial data from multiple periods of time. First, for familiarization with the data before their processing and second, in the process of space-time analysis in the course of the research. For majority of analyzed quantities it is required to find out, if the analyzed data are changing in space, how the data change in time, whether there are errors in the processed data etc.. An optimal solution of this problem is using the R scripting language. R comes with many interpolation methods (kriging, IDW, …), possibility to use virtually any format of input data from text, csv, xls or other file formats and provides a large abundance of optional picture, plot and graphical outputs. It is also possible to generate picture and text plots for every in-situ observation location of the examined quantity, do different statistical comparison and other applications. In short time it is possible to create a simple application that after minor modification can be employed for dealing with another bulk interpolation task. Thanks to this, after one exemplary application script has been created, it is possible to efficiently create and run additional modifications of the task, wheras other solution approaches (such as using desktop GIS programs) usually require a repetition of the same steps – setting of color ramp and color interval breaks, creating output map layouts, adding lists of extra data layers, transformations of shapefiles to identical coordinate systems and additional processing – for example statistical testing, creation of tables or creation of more plots that show a complete picture of the quantities' behavior. In our contribution, it is clearly demonstrated how the work with GIS data can be easily automated by using the R scripting language.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:58 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

FOSS4G 2013 Keynote

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Farm Maps Online: An Open Source Success In Norway

We present GPI, the primary application used to view and maintain information and geo-data of farms, farm geometries and farm properties throughout Norway - enabling farmers to create and update some farm data records themselves directly.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Data-driven Report Writing With R And QGIS

Creating a workflow from data to report with a GUI-driven package produces something that is hard to repeat. If the data is updated, the pattern of clicks needs to be reproduced. Some software products adapt to this by introducing a custom macro system, or embedding a programming language. The user records a macro, or writes a short script, and replays that script when the data changes. A further step in automating the process from data to report is to have a report document that drives the analysis process itself. Such dynamic documents update to reflect the current data by running chunks of code within the report text. This presentation will show how the "knitr" package for the R statistical system can be used in a GIS context to produce a dynamic document with maps and spatial analysis, and also demonstrate a (hopefully) novel technique to integrate with QGIS so that reports can contain analysis results and maps produced there.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Concurrent Online Webgis: A New Way To Map Together

Imagine a map on which many people collaborate at the same time. Imagine you see the edits happening in real time and you can also see the position of your collaborators and their current view on the map. A Google Docs for maps so you will. Imagine this map in a web-browser that runs on a mobile phone. Imagine not a single bit of data has to be stored on a central server but people are all acting as nodes storing the data in their browser.... and it still works offline..... With the rise of HTML5, including websockets and indexeddb, this is now possible. We created a concurrent online webgis where an unlimited amount of people can do collaborative work on a map in real time. A combination of Openlayers, Websocket and Indexeddb makes it possible to see and update each others edits and location. When people go offline their edits are stored for later synchronisation with their peers. This makes it very useful in unreliable network conditions. The tool has already been deployed in a few test cases. In low level educational projects where students share data with their smart-phone and create a common map. Also during wildfires where officers in the field regularly update the situation for the commanders in the control room. This is just the beginning, new HTML5 capabilities like WebRTC will open up new roads in map-making. Maps will become more dynamic and social, where (map)data will be directly shared between peers. Also if you get bored you get to make a map together with everybody else in the room.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Advanced Cartographic Map Rendering In GeoServer

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. Topics that will be covered are as follows: - Mastering multi-scale styling, choosing the appropriate style and content for the various map scales - Using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns - Line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat - Leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, line and fill patterns - Use the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates to your map - Leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology - Blending charts into a map - Dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views, such as on the fly contours extraction, heat maps, and wind maps from raster data - Leverage the analitic power of spatial databases to build dynamic thematic maps based on SQL views - Perform cross layer filtering and parametrize it to perform informative cross layer containment and neighborhood searches. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD documents allowing him to produce amazingly looking maps on his own. At the end of the presentation the SLD will no longer be cartographer's enemy.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Boost.Geometry, Introduction And Examples

The first part of the presentation gives an accessible introduction to Boost Geometry. The second part focuses on some algorithms in detail. Boost.Geometry is a generic library written in C++ providing concepts, geometry types and algorithms developed for solving problems in computational geometry. Boost.Geometry is using modern and portable C++ generic programming techniques and is built upon the foundation of the C++ Standard Library and Boost C++ Libraries. Boost.Geometry follows the OGC Simple Features standard. The Boost Geometry library kernel is designed as agnostic with respect to dimensions, coordinate systems, and types, which makes it generally applicable. A set of geometry models is delivered already by Boost Geometry. This set can be complemented through adaptation of user-defined geometry types, following the concepts defined by Boost Geometry. Boost.Geometry is developed since 2008 by Barend Gehrels and Bruno Lalande, and Mateusz Loskot. The library is peer reviewed by the Boost Community, and accepted into the well-known Boost collection in November 2009. Since 2011 it is released as a standard part of Boost, and immediately available for the majority of C++ programmers. The library is licensed under the (non restrictive) Boost Software License. A Spatial Index, developed by Adam Wulkiewicz, will be released as a standard part of the library in the next release of Boost. The Boost.Geometry library can, because it is a concept based library, following OGC Simple Features, easily be fit into for example Spatial Databases or existing projects using (probably legacy) Object Models. The presentation is dedicated to developers who are interested in receiving practical overview to the Boost Geometry library.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)