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50:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

VivaCity Smart City Platform

Many big vendors are exploring the smart city concept explaining that the smart city is a city aware of the things happening in the infrastructures. Thus the vendors are pushing for a Smart Grid, Smart Metering, Smart Sensors and Smart Whatsoever. This makes the city look like a sick patient, being monitored in many ways with histograms, gauges and panels for the information to be read. In our opinion this is the most unnatural way to interact with city information. Historically the most used way to interact with citizen oriented information is the map. Even today, with the always more precise GIS tools, the map can be an important part of a city information management tool. The VivaCity Project is a platform for the data-driven smart city. The core of the platform consists of a map- based view of the city itself, with all the possible cartographic open data made available by the governance. Beyond that, various apps can contribute in a smart manner through a set of plugins and entry-points for various views of the city, enabling a deep and complex interaction with the city itself. This system is self-sustaining, considering that the city already contains its monitors, which are the citizens. They just need two sets of tools: a visualization tool enabling the citizens to understand what is being done at a given time, and a tool to express opinions, problems and proposals to the governance. Considering that an overly generic tool loses its meaning because it has no real target, the interaction with the governance is delegated to function-specific or target-specific apps sharing a common API. This way both governance and citizen gain benefits, having both sides creating new data all the time and interconnecting information from the city and its inhabitants: governance has the ability make decisions based on real-time citizen-driven data, while citizens have the opportunity to create new services using the provided data. Figure 1 - Part of the VivaCity Smart City Interface For instance, the APIs offered to external apps are aimed to the following areas of interest: Politics, political decisions Maintenance • • • • • • • • • Security City Info, Touristic, Cultural information Management, urbanistic information Urban events, Urban Acupuncture, social analysis Emergency Management, Emergency information aggregation from the many sources available Economic, Managerial information Environmental, Energy usage information The data shown in the interface is the sum and interpretation of the data provided by the local governments through open data, or applications created by third parties like OpenMunicipio in Italy, the OpenSpending platform by OKFN or even simply mash-ups with complex datasources, like the USGS earthquake map, or the various regional APIs for simple services or any other app enabling the citizen to participate actively to the activity of his government. Using the platform in different cities enables a normalization of the services offered by the cities, and the direct comparison and interconnection of cities through a distributed API supporting the governance to empower policies and improve citizens’ lifes.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Gestural Interaction With Spatiotemporal Linked Open Data

Exploring complex spatiotemporal data can be very challenging for non-experts. Recently, gestural interaction has emerged as a promising option, which has been successfully applied to various domains, including simple map control. In this paper, we investigate whether gestures can be used to enable non-experts to explore and understand complex spatiotemporal phenomena. In this case study we made use of large amounts of Linked Open Data about the deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest and related ecological, economical and social factors. The results of our study indicate that people of all ages can easily learn gestures and successfully use them to explore the visualized and aggregated spatiotemporal data about the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
49:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

FOSS4G13 Keynote QGIS 2.0

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
13:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Using NoSQL & HTML5 Libraries To Rapidly Generate Interactive Web Visualisations Of High-volume Spatio-temporal Data

Twitter has developed over the past few years into a potent source of public opinion and comment. The service passed 500 million users in June 2012, collectively posting hundreds of millions of tweets each day, and several high-profile analyses of this data (such as the Twitter Political Index, which mapped sentiment across the US towards the 2012 presidential candidates over the course of their campaigns) have demonstrated its potential for insight and near-time customer feedback. Handling such large volumes and throughputs of data is a sizeable engineering challenge, however, and several commercial ventures (TweetReach, Tweet Archivist - many others) have sprung up specifically to deal with this complexity - at a cost. In addition, many existing solutions are unable to properly utilise the location data that is present in a significant proportion of tweets, losing out on the rich geographical context. This retrospective aims to demonstrate how an informed coupling of emerging open-source component technologies can be used to resolve the complex problems of i. large stored data volumes, ii. real-time streaming input, iii. concurrency of writes and iv. geographically querying and visualising results - with a minimal development outlay. Specifically, the construction of an open-source process to read, process, write, query and visualise streaming, geolocated Twitter data using the MongoDB NoSQL database and D3.js JavaScript library will be detailed, focusing on how MongoDB handles real-time spatial data (including spatial indexes & querying) and the unique features that make D3 so well-suited to visualising and exploring spatial data in the web browser.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Application Development With OpenLayers 3

OpenLayers 3 is a complete rewrite based on the latest in browser technology. This talk will focus on best practices for application development with OpenLayers 3. Covering simple maps in a page, integration with popular MV* frameworks, and native-wrapped mobile apps, we'll look at strategies for building mapping functionality into your applications. OpenLayers 3 aims to provide a high performance library with a wide breadth of functionality. Come learn about how it differs from OpenLayers 2, what makes it stand apart from other alternatives, and how you can best leverage its functionality.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

A Toe In The Water - Using Open Source Software To Support Catchment Management Planning

Integrated river catchment management planning seeks to balance many demands on the water and land, to protect water resources and ecology for the benefit of the economy, society and the natural world. Third sector organisations have a key role in this process - providing both the practical delivery of river restoration work, and an 'honest broker' role between government, private sector interests and local communities, to try and balance these often conflicting interests in a sustainable catchment plan. However, access to the complex evidence, software models and datasets, which are required for strategic environmental management planning, can be difficult for the third sector and community groups, due to reasons such as cost, licensing restrictions or technical capability. As the umbrella organisation of the rivers trusts movement in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, The Rivers Trust has been exploring the potential for open source software and datasets to improve the sharing of information and evidence with a range of stakeholders in the catchment management planning process. A web GIS application for identifying and prioritising barriers to migratory fish (based on Geoserver) and an application to identify sources of diffuse sediment pollution (built on SAGA GIS) will be demonstrated, and plans for future development of open source tools and data sharing is discussed.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Analysis Of Realtime Stream Data With Anvil

  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:34 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

Mappy-ng Open Source

Mappy is an online mapping company based in France and fully-owned by Solocal Group (PagesJaunes). Mappy was the pioneer in online mapping in France, and holds a significant market share in France and Belgium (about 10 millions monthly users). The company has developed an home-made LBS platform since 1998. The mapping service delivers 100 millions tiles a day. At the beginning of 2012, Mappy decided to redesign its core mapping service to meet new business challenges. The company needed a more standard and open source solution. Developers and product managers have fallen in love with Mapnik (some for code and performance, others for the map display quality). The team made the decision to build the new mapping service around Mapnik and others open source tools like PostGIS. The project was challenging : we switched from a MSSqlServer database/home made mapping engine/Windows architecture to a postgis database/mapnik engine/Linux one. During the development, we've seen and appreciated the energy around Mapnik and we started to gradually dive into code and contribute to some features. This talk will present a feedback on the overhaul : the functional and technical challenges, the decision to contribute to Mapnik project, the release of this service, its performance and the future roadmap.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

GeoNetwork Opensource - The Geospatial Metadata Catalogue

The presentation will provide an insight of the new functionality available in the latest release of the software. Publishing and managing spatial metadata using GeoNetwork opensource has become main stream in many Spatial Data Infrastructures. The project developers have made big progress on INSPIRE support, performance, scalability, usability, workflow, metadata profile plugins and catalogue services compliance. Examples of implementations of the software will be given, highlighting several national European SDI portals developed in the context of the INSPIRE directive as well as work for Environment Canada.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2013

iGUESS – The Good, The Bad And The Ugly Of Developing A Distributed Modeling System For European Cities

The integrated Geospatial Urban Energy decision Support System (iGUESS) was conceived as a way to help urban planners explore renewable energy and energy savings potentials to make cities more sustainable and self sufficient. Models that calculate solar, wind, and geothermal energy potential can be complex to build and run, so we felt we could simplify the process by creating a web-based tool that a planner could run from their browser. To maximize interoperability with existing models and data sources, we decided to build the system using existing OGC standards and protocols. iGUESS is a web-based system for connecting data, modeling, and visualisation services distributed across the Internet. Users can leverage data and processing services offered via standard OGC protocols such as WMS, WFS, WCS, CSW, and WPS. iGUESS helps users match data with models, launch model runs, monitor progress of execution, and visualize computed results. iGUESS does not store data or host computation services, but instead relies on data and modeling web services provided elsewhere in the project, by our partners, and by third parties. Developing iGUESS has given us a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of a distributed modeling system based on OGC services, and some of the inherent limits of these protocols. The interface allows users to interact with services in real-time, using minimal caching, so it always presents an accurate reflection of what data and modeling services are available. This design has presented us with interesting challenges related to intermittent and unpredictable availability of distributed data and process services that live beyond the bounds of the system. The primary advantages of this distributed modeling system is its modularity and flexibility. Users can run models using input datasets they (or others) may have published for different purposes. Models can be upgraded and improved by their publishers without requiring users to install new software. Finally, running models via WPS can be easier than configuring a local desktop model, and the processing is offloaded onto a computer presumably more suited to handling large, complex calculations. Many of the specific challenges we faced have been related to the limitations of the WPS protocol. It is difficult to precisely specify inputs or describe outputs, and there is no mechanism for prioritzing or terminating a running process. The lack of process control is particularly relevant to the sorts of large, processor intensive models that iGUESS was designed to run. Also, very little of the data our partners need to use is actually available online, and they have encountered a wide range of logistical and institutional barriers to providing it themselves. Lastly, we are still trying to cope with issues related to exposing computationally expensive processes to the Internet. This talk will present a technical overview of the iGUESS system, how it works, alternate approaches we considered (distributed architecture vs. traditional “desktop” approach), and the lessons we learned building it (managing complexity and the risks of oversimplification). It will also explore some of the “real world” hurdles mentioned above, and will offer some ideas and insights into the type of applications that are best suited for the WPS protocol.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)