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47:00 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Autonomous Systems – A Rigorous Architectural Characterization

Joseph Sifakis: "Autonomous Systems – A Rigorous Architectural Characterization" The concept of autonomy is key to the IoT vision promising increasing integration of smart services and systems minimizing human intervention. This vision challenges our capability to build complex open trustworthy autonomous systems. We lack a rigorous common semantic framework for autonomous systems. There is currently a lot of confusion regarding the main characteristics of autonomous systems. In the literature, we find a profusion of poorly understood “self”-prefixed terms related to autonomy such as Self-healing, Self-optimization, Self-protection, Self-awareness, Self-organization etc. It is remarkable that the debate about autonomous vehicles focuses almost exclusively on AI and learning techniques while it ignores many other equally important autonomous system design issues. Autonomous systems involve agents and objects coordinated in some common environment so that their collective behavior meets a set of global goals. We propose a general computational model combining a system architecture model and an agent model. The architecture model allows expression of dynamic reconfigurable multi-mode coordination between components. The agent model consists of five interacting modules implementing each one a characteristic feature: perception, reflection, goal management, planning and self-adaptation. It determines a concept of autonomic complexity accounting for the specific difficulty to build autonomous systems. We emphasize that the main characteristic of autonomous systems is their ability to handle knowledge and adaptively respond to environment changes. A main conclusion is that autonomy should be associated with functionality and not with specific techniques. We conclude that autonomy is a kind of broad intelligence. Building trustworthy and optimal autonomous systems goes far beyond the AI challenge. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:02:13 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: ALGORAND - The Truly Distributed Ledger

Silvio Micali: "ALGORAND – The Truly Distributed Ledger" A distributed ledger is a tamperproof sequence of data that can be read and augmented by everyone. Distributed ledgers stand to revolutionize the way a democratic society operates. They secure all kinds of traditional transactions –such as payments, asset transfers, titling– in the exact order in which they occur; and enable totally new transactions ---such as cryptocurrencies and smart contracts. They can remove intermediaries and usher in a new paradigm for trust. As currently implemented, however, distributed ledgers cannot achieve their enormous potential. Algorand is an alternative, democratic, and efficient distributed ledger. Unlike prior ledgers based on ‘proof of work’, it dispenses with ‘miners’. Indeed, Algorand requires only a negligible amount of computation. Moreover, its transaction history does not ‘fork’ with overwhelming probability: i.e., Algorand guarantees the finality of all transactions. Finally, Algorand enjoys flexible self-governance. A successful society must be able to evolve, and a cryptocurrency cannot be an ocean liner on autopilot. By using its hallmark propose-and-agree process, Algorand can correct its course as necessary or desirable, without any ‘hard forks’. Thanks to this core process, Algorand can routinely summon the contribution of each single ‘token’ for reaching any future decision. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
46:38 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: A New Golden Age for Computer Architecture

David A. Patterson: "A New Golden Age for Computer Architecture" In the 1980s, Mead and Conway democratized chip design and high-level language programming surpassed assembly language programming, which made instruction set advances viable. Innovations like Reduced Instruction Set Computers (RISC), superscalar, and speculation ushered in a Golden Age of computer architecture, when performance doubled every 18 months. The ending of Dennard Scaling and Moore’s Law crippled this path; microprocessor performance improved only 3% last year!  In addition to poor performance gains of modern microprocessors, Spectre recently demonstrated timing attacks that leak information at high rates. The ending of Dennard scaling and Moore’s law and the deceleration of performance gains for standard microprocessors are not problems that must be solved but facts that if accepted offer breathtaking opportunities. We believe high-level, domain-specific languages and architectures, freeing architects from the chains of proprietary instruction sets, and the demand from the public for improved security will usher in a new Golden Age. Aided by open source ecosystems, agilely developed chips will convincingly demonstrate advances and thereby accelerate commercial adoption. The instruction set philosophy of the general-purpose processors in these chips will likely be RISC, which has stood the test of time. We envision the same rapid improvement as in the last Golden Age, but this time in cost, energy, and security as well as in performance. Like the 1980s, the next decade will be exciting for computer architects in academia and in industry! This video is also available on another stream: https://hitsmediaweb.h-its.org/Mediasite/Play/8832b244b24f4030ad62aca59c4dbeff1d?autoStart=false&popout=true The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
33:48 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: From Algebra to Geometry

Caucher Birkar: "From Algebra to Geometry" Since the ancient times people have tried to understand systems of polynomial equations for practical and/or abstract reasons. It was slowly understood that geometry can be used to understand such equations by "graphing" their solutions in some appropriate space. The geometric picture provides a window for our intuition to guide us in how to investigate the qualitative nature of the solutions while algebra provides the machinery for rigorous proofs. In this talk I will try to explain some aspects of this story in simple terms. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
47:18 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Ingredients for Successful Research

Martin Hellman: "Ingredients for Successful Research" Looking back over more than 50 years of doing research, I can discern several key “ingredients” that helped me in my work. First, I was not afraid of doing things that others thought foolish, and this was also important in the work of many of my most successful colleagues. Second, I had what Buddhism calls “beginner’s mind” – I did my best work in cryptography when I knew only a small fraction of the relevant math that I now know. Third, I trusted my intuition, rather than rejecting it as “irrational.” This talk illustrates each of these points from my personal experience. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
40:52 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Hot Topic: Blockchain and distributed ledgers

Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Will the reality live up to the hype? Will distributed ledger provide a ‘reset’ button for the internet and other networks? Many of the primary privacy risks prevalent today are due to an increasing centralization of information. A decentralized network is potentially more secure but not without its vulnerabilities. During this session, a panel of experts will illuminate how distributed ledgers work, discuss their potential and explore how the world of finance and other application areas could be reshaped. Cryptocurrencies and their escalating, volatile values have successfully captivated the public. However, the rise to fame has not brought a thorough understanding of the underlying technology along with it and distributed ledgers remain largely misunderstood. A better comprehension of the technology is increasingly vital due to its potential ramifications in finance and regarding privacy. Distributed ledgers could conceivably reshape finance through cryptocurrencies and smart contracts, cure data protection issues with social media and re-decentralize the internet. In short, a chance to hit the ‘reset’ button. Simultaneously, the very aspects that make distributed ledgers so promising are the same that make it vulnerable. Though replicability, immutability and being append-only are enormous strengths, they are equally large burdens when used maliciously. The Hot Topic was coordinated and will be moderated by Eva Wolfangel, European Science Writer of the Year 2018, a science journalist with over 15 years of experience covering a range of scientific issues and technological developments and highlighting their significance for the public. In order to unravel the technology behind distributed ledgers and its potential implications, Wolfangel has enlisted the help of experts with backgrounds ranging from academia to industry. Through discussions and an open debate, the speakers aim to distinguish the implausible from the practical and distill how the distributed ledgers will further influence our lives. Experts: Mihai Alisie is the co-founder of Ethereum blockchain applications and founder of Akasha, a social network based on the Ethereum-Blockchain and the InterPlanetary File System. Demelza Hays is researching the role of cryptocurrency in asset management in the Business Economics program at the University of Liechtenstein. Dexter Hadley’s expertise is in translating big data into precision medicine and digital health at the University of California. His background is in genomics and computational biology and he has training in clinical pathology. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
45:13 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: An Introduction to AI and Deep Learning

John E. Hopcroft: "An Introduction to AI and Deep Learning" A major advance in AI occurred in 2012 when AlexNet won the ImageNat competition with a deep network. The success was sufficiently better than previous years that deep networks were applied in many applications with great success. However, there is little understanding of why deep learning works. This talk will give an introduction to machine learning and then focus on current research directions in deep learning. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
47:43 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Big Data, Technological Disruption and the 800 Pound Gorilla in the Corner

Michael Stonebraker: "Big Data, Technological Disruption and the 800 Pound Gorilla in the Corner" This talk will focus on the current market for “Big Data” products, specifically those that deal with one or more of “the 3 V’s”. I will suggest that the volume problem for business intelligence applications is pretty well solved by the data warehouse vendors; however upcoming “data science” tasks are poorly supported at present. On the other hand, there is rapid technological progress, so “stay tuned”. In the velocity arena recent “new SQL” and stream processing products are doing a good job, but there are a few storm clouds on the horizon. The variety space has a collection of mature products, along with considerable innovation from startups. I will discuss opportunities in this space, especially those enabled by possible disruption from new technology. Also discussed will be the pain levels I observe in current enterprises, culminating in my presentation of “the 800 pound gorilla in the corner.” The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
45:55 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: If You're Not Writing a Program, Don't Use a Programming Language

Leslie Lamport: "If You're Not Writing a Program, Don't Use a Programming Language" Algorithms are not programs. They can and should be written with math rather than programming languages or pseudo-languages. This applies to many more algorithms than the ones taught in algorithm courses. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
50:23 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Hot Topic: Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Panel Discussion "Technology"

Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Will the reality live up to the hype? Will distributed ledger provide a ‘reset’ button for the internet and other networks? Many of the primary privacy risks prevalent today are due to an increasing centralization of information. A decentralized network is potentially more secure but not without its vulnerabilities. During this session, a panel of experts will illuminate how distributed ledgers work, discuss their potential and explore how the world of finance and other application areas could be reshaped. Cryptocurrencies and their escalating, volatile values have successfully captivated the public. However, the rise to fame has not brought a thorough understanding of the underlying technology along with it and distributed ledgers remain largely misunderstood. A better comprehension of the technology is increasingly vital due to its potential ramifications in finance and regarding privacy. Distributed ledgers could conceivably reshape finance through cryptocurrencies and smart contracts, cure data protection issues with social media and re-decentralize the internet. In short, a chance to hit the ‘reset’ button. Simultaneously, the very aspects that make distributed ledgers so promising are the same that make it vulnerable. Though replicability, immutability and being append-only are enormous strengths, they are equally large burdens when used maliciously. The Hot Topic was coordinated and will be moderated by Eva Wolfangel, European Science Writer of the Year 2018, a science journalist with over 15 years of experience covering a range of scientific issues and technological developments and highlighting their significance for the public. In order to unravel the technology behind distributed ledgers and its potential implications, Wolfangel has enlisted the help of experts with backgrounds ranging from academia to industry. Through discussions and an open debate, the speakers aim to distinguish the implausible from the practical and distill how the distributed ledgers will further influence our lives. Experts: Donald Kossmann is the director of the Microsoft Research Lab in Redmond. The Redmond Lab does research in all core areas of computer science. In his research, he works on data management in the cloud. His goal is to make data in the cloud cheaper, more valuable, and more secure. Roman Matzutt and Martin Henze are working as researchers in the field of security and privacy of communication and distributed systems at RWTH Aachen University. Their recent research focuses on the technical foundations and optimizations of blockchains and distributed ledger technology as well as their implications for users. C. Mohan has been an IBM researcher for 36 years in the database and related areas. The IBM Fellow and former IBM India Chief Scientist is currently focused on Blockchain, Big Data and HTAP technologies. Silvio Micali is an ACM A.M. Turing Award laureate who has been on the MIT faculty since 1983, in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, where he is Ford Professor of Engineering. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:06:53 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Scientific Interaction: Gender Roles & Career Routes for Mathematicians and Computer Scientists

Gender Roles & Career Routes for Mathematicians and Computer Scientists Prof. Dr. Ragni Piene – University of Oslo, Departments of Mathematics Prof. Dr. Anna Wienhard – University of Heidelberg, Department of Mathematics Christine Regitz – Vice President of the Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI) Moderated by: Prof. Dr. Peter Mirski – Management Center Innsbruck (MCI) In this session, participants gained insight into the gender roles of mathematicians and computer scientists, and what career prospects they have in both the academic and business environment. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
52:37 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Random perturbations of Euclidean Geometry

Wendelin Werner: "Random perturbations of Euclidean Geometry" I will survey (in a non-technical way) some recent mathematical developments dealing with the following questions originating from theoretical physics: What are the natural random fluctuations away from Euclidean geometry, and what properties do they have? This video is also available on another stream: https://hitsmediaweb.h-its.org/Mediasite/Play/e055b61979b541cc8b3debc6466db1a51d?autoStart=false&popout=true The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
45:51 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Algebra, Logic, Geometry: at the Foundation of the Computer Science

Sir C. Antony R. Hoare: "Algebra, Logic, Geometry at the Foundation of Computer Science" I show by examples how the Theory of Programming can be taught to first year CS undergraduates. The only prerequisite is their High School acquaintance with algebra, geometry and propositional calculus. The students’ motive is to learn how to construct and debugs their programs. I start with the familiar laws for disjunction in Boolean Algebra, illustrated by disjunction. A deductive rule for proof by cases is derived from the algebra. The algebra is extended by the operators of spatial and temporal logic: William of Occam’s ‘while’ (|) and ‘then’ (;). They satisfy the same familiar algebraic laws, including distribution through disjunction. A weak interchange law describes how they distribute through one another by ‘shuffling’. Proof rules are then derived for a modal logic of time and space. If this logic is applied to propositions about the behaviour of programs, the ‘while’ and ‘then’ operations can be reinterpreted as sequential and concurrent compositions of programs. The proof rules of the modal logic are then definitionally equivalent to two historic logics due to Hoare and Milner. They are now used widely for mechanical reasoning about correctness of programs and about implementations of programming languages. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
14:53 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2019

6th HLF – Interviews with young researchers: Vasilios Mavroudis

Young researchers at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2019
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
08:27 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2019

6th HLF – Interviews with young researchers: Jonas Bayer

Young researchers at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2019
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
08:54 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2019

6th HLF – Interviews with young researchers: Tamás Görbe

Young researchers at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2019
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
27:50 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Butler W. Lampson

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
36:15 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates : Richard Manning Karp

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
22:52 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Alessio Figalli

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:34:04 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Hot Topic: Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Presentations "Applications"

Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Will the reality live up to the hype? Will distributed ledger provide a ‘reset’ button for the internet and other networks? Many of the primary privacy risks prevalent today are due to an increasing centralization of information. A decentralized network is potentially more secure but not without its vulnerabilities. During this session, a panel of experts will illuminate how distributed ledgers work, discuss their potential and explore how the world of finance and other application areas could be reshaped. Cryptocurrencies and their escalating, volatile values have successfully captivated the public. However, the rise to fame has not brought a thorough understanding of the underlying technology along with it and distributed ledgers remain largely misunderstood. A better comprehension of the technology is increasingly vital due to its potential ramifications in finance and regarding privacy. Distributed ledgers could conceivably reshape finance through cryptocurrencies and smart contracts, cure data protection issues with social media and re-decentralize the internet. In short, a chance to hit the ‘reset’ button. Simultaneously, the very aspects that make distributed ledgers so promising are the same that make it vulnerable. Though replicability, immutability and being append-only are enormous strengths, they are equally large burdens when used maliciously. The Hot Topic was coordinated and will be moderated by Eva Wolfangel, European Science Writer of the Year 2018, a science journalist with over 15 years of experience covering a range of scientific issues and technological developments and highlighting their significance for the public. In order to unravel the technology behind distributed ledgers and its potential implications, Wolfangel has enlisted the help of experts with backgrounds ranging from academia to industry. Through discussions and an open debate, the speakers aim to distinguish the implausible from the practical and distill how the distributed ledgers will further influence our lives. Experts: Mihai Alisie is the co-founder of Ethereum blockchain applications and founder of Akasha, a social network based on the Ethereum-Blockchain and the InterPlanetary File System. Demelza Hays is researching the role of cryptocurrency in asset management in the Business Economics program at the University of Liechtenstein. Dexter Hadley’s expertise is in translating big data into precision medicine and digital health at the University of California. His background is in genomics and computational biology and he has training in clinical pathology. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
13:43 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Constantinos Daskalakis

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
12:19 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Michael Stonebraker

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University. More information to the Heidelberg Laureate Forum: Website: http://www.heidelberg-laureate-forum.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HeidelbergLaureateForum Twitter: https://twitter.com/hlforum Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/hlforum More videos from the HLF: https://www.youtube.com/user/LaureateForum Blog: https://scilogs.spektrum.de/hlf/
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
13:51 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Silvio Micali

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:23:59 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Hot Topic: Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Presentations "Technology"

Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Will the reality live up to the hype? Will distributed ledger provide a ‘reset’ button for the internet and other networks? Many of the primary privacy risks prevalent today are due to an increasing centralization of information. A decentralized network is potentially more secure but not without its vulnerabilities. During this session, a panel of experts will illuminate how distributed ledgers work, discuss their potential and explore how the world of finance and other application areas could be reshaped. Cryptocurrencies and their escalating, volatile values have successfully captivated the public. However, the rise to fame has not brought a thorough understanding of the underlying technology along with it and distributed ledgers remain largely misunderstood. A better comprehension of the technology is increasingly vital due to its potential ramifications in finance and regarding privacy. Distributed ledgers could conceivably reshape finance through cryptocurrencies and smart contracts, cure data protection issues with social media and re-decentralize the internet. In short, a chance to hit the ‘reset’ button. Simultaneously, the very aspects that make distributed ledgers so promising are the same that make it vulnerable. Though replicability, immutability and being append-only are enormous strengths, they are equally large burdens when used maliciously. The Hot Topic was coordinated and will be moderated by Eva Wolfangel, European Science Writer of the Year 2018, a science journalist with over 15 years of experience covering a range of scientific issues and technological developments and highlighting their significance for the public. In order to unravel the technology behind distributed ledgers and its potential implications, Wolfangel has enlisted the help of experts with backgrounds ranging from academia to industry. Through discussions and an open debate, the speakers aim to distinguish the implausible from the practical and distill how the distributed ledgers will further influence our lives. Experts: Donald Kossmann is the director of the Microsoft Research Lab in Redmond. The Redmond Lab does research in all core areas of computer science. In his research, he works on data management in the cloud. His goal is to make data in the cloud cheaper, more valuable, and more secure. Roman Matzutt and Martin Henze are working as researchers in the field of security and privacy of communication and distributed systems at RWTH Aachen University. Their recent research focuses on the technical foundations and optimizations of blockchains and distributed ledger technology as well as their implications for users. C. Mohan has been an IBM researcher for 36 years in the database and related areas. The IBM Fellow and former IBM India Chief Scientist is currently focused on Blockchain, Big Data and HTAP technologies. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:15:05 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Time, Einstein and the Coolest Stuff in the Universe

William D. Phillips: "Time, Einstein and the coolest stuff in the universe" At the beginning of the 20th century Einstein changed the way we think about Time. Now, early in the 21st century, the measurement of Time is being revolutionized by the ability to cool a gas of atoms to temperatures millions of times lower than any naturally occurring temperature in the universe. Atomic clocks, the best timekeepers ever made, are one of the scientific and technological wonders of modern life. Such super-accurate clocks are essential to industry, commerce, and science; they are the heart of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which guides cars, airplanes, and hikers to their destinations. Today, the best primary atomic clocks use ultra-cold atoms, achieve accuracies of about one second in 300 million years, and are getting better all the time, while a new generation of atomic clocks is leading us to re-define what we mean by time. Super-cold atoms, with temperatures that can be below a billionth of a degree above absolute zero, use, and allow tests of, some of Einstein's strangest predictions. This will be a lively, multimedia presentation, including exciting experimental demonstrations and down-to-earth explanations about some of today's hottest (and coolest) science.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
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