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34:25 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF - Interviews with laureates and young researchers in mathematics and computer science: John Urschel interviewing Sanjeev Arora

Young researcher John Urschel, USA, interviews laureate Sanjeev Arora, ACM Prize in Computing, 2011. At the 6th HLF they sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
47:00 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Autonomous Systems – A Rigorous Architectural Characterization

Joseph Sifakis: "Autonomous Systems – A Rigorous Architectural Characterization" The concept of autonomy is key to the IoT vision promising increasing integration of smart services and systems minimizing human intervention. This vision challenges our capability to build complex open trustworthy autonomous systems. We lack a rigorous common semantic framework for autonomous systems. There is currently a lot of confusion regarding the main characteristics of autonomous systems. In the literature, we find a profusion of poorly understood “self”-prefixed terms related to autonomy such as Self-healing, Self-optimization, Self-protection, Self-awareness, Self-organization etc. It is remarkable that the debate about autonomous vehicles focuses almost exclusively on AI and learning techniques while it ignores many other equally important autonomous system design issues. Autonomous systems involve agents and objects coordinated in some common environment so that their collective behavior meets a set of global goals. We propose a general computational model combining a system architecture model and an agent model. The architecture model allows expression of dynamic reconfigurable multi-mode coordination between components. The agent model consists of five interacting modules implementing each one a characteristic feature: perception, reflection, goal management, planning and self-adaptation. It determines a concept of autonomic complexity accounting for the specific difficulty to build autonomous systems. We emphasize that the main characteristic of autonomous systems is their ability to handle knowledge and adaptively respond to environment changes. A main conclusion is that autonomy should be associated with functionality and not with specific techniques. We conclude that autonomy is a kind of broad intelligence. Building trustworthy and optimal autonomous systems goes far beyond the AI challenge. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:02:13 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: ALGORAND - The Truly Distributed Ledger

Silvio Micali: "ALGORAND – The Truly Distributed Ledger" A distributed ledger is a tamperproof sequence of data that can be read and augmented by everyone. Distributed ledgers stand to revolutionize the way a democratic society operates. They secure all kinds of traditional transactions –such as payments, asset transfers, titling– in the exact order in which they occur; and enable totally new transactions ---such as cryptocurrencies and smart contracts. They can remove intermediaries and usher in a new paradigm for trust. As currently implemented, however, distributed ledgers cannot achieve their enormous potential. Algorand is an alternative, democratic, and efficient distributed ledger. Unlike prior ledgers based on ‘proof of work’, it dispenses with ‘miners’. Indeed, Algorand requires only a negligible amount of computation. Moreover, its transaction history does not ‘fork’ with overwhelming probability: i.e., Algorand guarantees the finality of all transactions. Finally, Algorand enjoys flexible self-governance. A successful society must be able to evolve, and a cryptocurrency cannot be an ocean liner on autopilot. By using its hallmark propose-and-agree process, Algorand can correct its course as necessary or desirable, without any ‘hard forks’. Thanks to this core process, Algorand can routinely summon the contribution of each single ‘token’ for reaching any future decision. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
49:02 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: The Riemann Hypothesis

Sir Michael Francis Atiyah: "The Riemann Hypothesis" The Riemann Hypothesis is a famous unsolved problem dating from 1859. I will present a simple proof using a radically new approach. It is based on work of von Neumann (1936), Hirzebruch (1954) and Dirac (1928). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
47:39 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: On the early history of Expanders

Gregory Margulis: "On the early history of expanders" The notion of an expander was introduced in early nineteen seventies by M.S.Pinsker in his work on the complexity of a concentrator. In recent decades the theory of expanders attracted a lot of attention and became a rather big industry. I will talk only about the development of this theory until approximately 1987-88. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
56:05 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Equilibria, Fixed Points, and Computational Complexity: from von Neumann to Generative Adversarial Networks

Constantinos Daskalakis: "Equilibria, Fixed Points, and Computational Complexity: from von Neumann to Generative Adversarial Networks" The concept of equilibrium, in its various forms, has played a central role in the development of Game Theory and Economics. The mathematical properties and computational complexity of equilibria are also intimately related to mathematical programming, online learning, and fixed point theory. More recently, equilibrium computation has been proposed as a means to learn generative models of high-dimensional distributions. In this talk, we review fundamental results on minimax equilibrium and its relationship to mathematical programming and online learning. We then turn to Nash equilibrium, reviewing some of our work on its computational intractability. We conclude with modern applications of equilibrium computation, presenting recent progress and open problems in the training of Generative Adversarial Networks. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
33:48 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: From Algebra to Geometry

Caucher Birkar: "From Algebra to Geometry" Since the ancient times people have tried to understand systems of polynomial equations for practical and/or abstract reasons. It was slowly understood that geometry can be used to understand such equations by "graphing" their solutions in some appropriate space. The geometric picture provides a window for our intuition to guide us in how to investigate the qualitative nature of the solutions while algebra provides the machinery for rigorous proofs. In this talk I will try to explain some aspects of this story in simple terms. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
47:18 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Ingredients for Successful Research

Martin Hellman: "Ingredients for Successful Research" Looking back over more than 50 years of doing research, I can discern several key “ingredients” that helped me in my work. First, I was not afraid of doing things that others thought foolish, and this was also important in the work of many of my most successful colleagues. Second, I had what Buddhism calls “beginner’s mind” – I did my best work in cryptography when I knew only a small fraction of the relevant math that I now know. Third, I trusted my intuition, rather than rejecting it as “irrational.” This talk illustrates each of these points from my personal experience. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
45:55 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: If You're Not Writing a Program, Don't Use a Programming Language

Leslie Lamport: "If You're Not Writing a Program, Don't Use a Programming Language" Algorithms are not programs. They can and should be written with math rather than programming languages or pseudo-languages. This applies to many more algorithms than the ones taught in algorithm courses. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
50:23 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Hot Topic: Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Panel Discussion "Technology"

Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Will the reality live up to the hype? Will distributed ledger provide a ‘reset’ button for the internet and other networks? Many of the primary privacy risks prevalent today are due to an increasing centralization of information. A decentralized network is potentially more secure but not without its vulnerabilities. During this session, a panel of experts will illuminate how distributed ledgers work, discuss their potential and explore how the world of finance and other application areas could be reshaped. Cryptocurrencies and their escalating, volatile values have successfully captivated the public. However, the rise to fame has not brought a thorough understanding of the underlying technology along with it and distributed ledgers remain largely misunderstood. A better comprehension of the technology is increasingly vital due to its potential ramifications in finance and regarding privacy. Distributed ledgers could conceivably reshape finance through cryptocurrencies and smart contracts, cure data protection issues with social media and re-decentralize the internet. In short, a chance to hit the ‘reset’ button. Simultaneously, the very aspects that make distributed ledgers so promising are the same that make it vulnerable. Though replicability, immutability and being append-only are enormous strengths, they are equally large burdens when used maliciously. The Hot Topic was coordinated and will be moderated by Eva Wolfangel, European Science Writer of the Year 2018, a science journalist with over 15 years of experience covering a range of scientific issues and technological developments and highlighting their significance for the public. In order to unravel the technology behind distributed ledgers and its potential implications, Wolfangel has enlisted the help of experts with backgrounds ranging from academia to industry. Through discussions and an open debate, the speakers aim to distinguish the implausible from the practical and distill how the distributed ledgers will further influence our lives. Experts: Donald Kossmann is the director of the Microsoft Research Lab in Redmond. The Redmond Lab does research in all core areas of computer science. In his research, he works on data management in the cloud. His goal is to make data in the cloud cheaper, more valuable, and more secure. Roman Matzutt and Martin Henze are working as researchers in the field of security and privacy of communication and distributed systems at RWTH Aachen University. Their recent research focuses on the technical foundations and optimizations of blockchains and distributed ledger technology as well as their implications for users. C. Mohan has been an IBM researcher for 36 years in the database and related areas. The IBM Fellow and former IBM India Chief Scientist is currently focused on Blockchain, Big Data and HTAP technologies. Silvio Micali is an ACM A.M. Turing Award laureate who has been on the MIT faculty since 1983, in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, where he is Ford Professor of Engineering. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
52:37 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: Random perturbations of Euclidean Geometry

Wendelin Werner: "Random perturbations of Euclidean Geometry" I will survey (in a non-technical way) some recent mathematical developments dealing with the following questions originating from theoretical physics: What are the natural random fluctuations away from Euclidean geometry, and what properties do they have? This video is also available on another stream: https://hitsmediaweb.h-its.org/Mediasite/Play/e055b61979b541cc8b3debc6466db1a51d?autoStart=false&popout=true The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
08:27 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2019

6th HLF – Interviews with young researchers: Jonas Bayer

Young researchers at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2019
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
27:50 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Butler W. Lampson

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
18:22 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Ngô Bảo Châu

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
13:51 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Silvio Micali

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
13:14 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Interviews with mathematics and computer science laureates: Gerd Faltings

Laureates at the 6th HLF sit down with Tom Geller, Tom Geller Productions, to discuss their career, mentoring and their experience at the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF). These renowned scientists have been honored with most prestigious awards in mathematics and computer science: Abel Prize, ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing, Fields Medal and Nevanlinna Prize. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video. Background: The Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation (HLFF) annually organizes the Heidelberg Laureate Forum (HLF), which is a networking event for mathematicians and computer scientists from all over the world. The HLFF was established and is funded by the German foundation the Klaus Tschira Stiftung (KTS), which promotes natural sciences, mathematics and computer science. The HLF is strongly supported by the award-granting institutions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM: ACM A.M. Turing Award, ACM Prize in Computing), the International Mathematical Union (IMU: Fields Medal, Nevanlinna Prize), and the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (DNVA: Abel Prize). The Scientific Partners of the HLFF are the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) and Heidelberg University.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
1:23:59 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Hot Topic: Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Presentations "Technology"

Blockchain and distributed ledgers: Will the reality live up to the hype? Will distributed ledger provide a ‘reset’ button for the internet and other networks? Many of the primary privacy risks prevalent today are due to an increasing centralization of information. A decentralized network is potentially more secure but not without its vulnerabilities. During this session, a panel of experts will illuminate how distributed ledgers work, discuss their potential and explore how the world of finance and other application areas could be reshaped. Cryptocurrencies and their escalating, volatile values have successfully captivated the public. However, the rise to fame has not brought a thorough understanding of the underlying technology along with it and distributed ledgers remain largely misunderstood. A better comprehension of the technology is increasingly vital due to its potential ramifications in finance and regarding privacy. Distributed ledgers could conceivably reshape finance through cryptocurrencies and smart contracts, cure data protection issues with social media and re-decentralize the internet. In short, a chance to hit the ‘reset’ button. Simultaneously, the very aspects that make distributed ledgers so promising are the same that make it vulnerable. Though replicability, immutability and being append-only are enormous strengths, they are equally large burdens when used maliciously. The Hot Topic was coordinated and will be moderated by Eva Wolfangel, European Science Writer of the Year 2018, a science journalist with over 15 years of experience covering a range of scientific issues and technological developments and highlighting their significance for the public. In order to unravel the technology behind distributed ledgers and its potential implications, Wolfangel has enlisted the help of experts with backgrounds ranging from academia to industry. Through discussions and an open debate, the speakers aim to distinguish the implausible from the practical and distill how the distributed ledgers will further influence our lives. Experts: Donald Kossmann is the director of the Microsoft Research Lab in Redmond. The Redmond Lab does research in all core areas of computer science. In his research, he works on data management in the cloud. His goal is to make data in the cloud cheaper, more valuable, and more secure. Roman Matzutt and Martin Henze are working as researchers in the field of security and privacy of communication and distributed systems at RWTH Aachen University. Their recent research focuses on the technical foundations and optimizations of blockchains and distributed ledger technology as well as their implications for users. C. Mohan has been an IBM researcher for 36 years in the database and related areas. The IBM Fellow and former IBM India Chief Scientist is currently focused on Blockchain, Big Data and HTAP technologies. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
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