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49:07 DjangoCon US English 2017

Keynote - Testing in Django

The Django documentation section on testing starts with this: “Automated testing is an extremely useful bug-killing tool for the modern Web developer.” Nobody can argue with that. Testing is an integral part of modern software development, and Ana’s talk will offer an in-depth overview of how the Django testing framework evolved; showcase some common techniques, tools, and best practices; talk about speed improvements; and guide you through a real-world example of testing a Django app. Testing is fun, isn’t it?
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
43:10 DjangoCon US English 2017

The denormalized query engine design pattern

Most web applications need to offer search functionality. Open source tools like Solr and Elasticsearch are a powerful option for building custom search engines… but it turns out they can be used for way more than just search. By treating your search engine as a denormalization layer, you can use it to answer queries that would be too expensive to answer using your core relational database. Questions like “What are the top twenty tags used by my users from Spain?” or “What are the most common times of day for events to start?” or “Which articles contain addresses within 500 miles of Toronto?”. With the denormalized query engine design pattern, modifications to relational data are published to a denormalized schema in Elasticsearch or Solr. Data queries can then be answered using either the relational database or the search engine, depending on the nature of the specific query. The search engine returns database IDs, which are inflated from the database before being displayed to a user - ensuring that users never see stale data even if the search engine is not 100% up to date with the latest changes. This opens up all kinds of new capabilities for slicing, dicing and exploring data. In this talk, I’ll be illustrating this pattern by focusing on Elasticsearch - showing how it can be used with Django to bring new capabilities to your application. I’ll discuss the challenge of keeping data synchronized between a relational database and a search engine, and show examples of features that become much easier to build once you have this denormalization layer in place. Use-cases I explore will include: Finding interesting patterns in your data Building a recommendation engine Advanced geographical search and filtering Reacting to recent user activity on your site Analyzing a new large dataset using Elasticsearch and Kibana.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
34:43 DjangoCon US English 2017

Serverless Django

You’ve probably heard the buzzword by now - “serverless”. It’s a new type of application architecture where traditional web servers are replaced by ephemeral cloud services. But what does it mean for the average Django user? Hint: lower costs, more scalability, more capabilities and less ops tasks to worry about! First, this talk will explain what “serverless” really means for you, and provide an overview the advantages and disadvantages of event-driven server-less architectures. Next, we’ll demonstrate how easy it is to migrate your existing Django CMS application to run on AWS Lambda by using the Zappa framework, including some real-world issues you might bump into. Then, we’ll show how to implement some of the most common Django patterns as part of a server-less architecture - uploaded avatar image processing, batch and timed sending of email, and long running tasks like statistical aggregation. Finally, we’ll show how to scale up your server-less application to trillions of events per year by distributing your app to dozens of data centers all around the globe, and do an ultimate cost analysis of your new system. You’ll leave with new ideas on how to save money and stress on your existing applications and cool new ways to implement features in your next app!
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
42:40 DjangoCon US English 2017

The CoC committee is here for you

Since a community-wide Code of Conduct was adopted in 2013, the Django Software Foundation has had a Code of Conduct committee. The committee deals with CoC violations on e.g. mailing lists, aggregates reports from conferences, can check speaker lists against CoC reports and provide general advice and support. Django events tend to have their own CoC with their own CoC team. Not everyone in the wider tech community is fond of Codes of Conduct. However, a lot of this reluctance is rooted in misunderstanding about what this actually entails, and what the committee and teams actually do in both their active and reactive roles. That’s why this talk will give a peek behind the scenes of the work of the CoC committee and CoC teams, how incidents are actually handled with various real life examples, and how this leads to a better community for everyone. Including you.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
55:32 DjangoCon US English 2017

Keynote - Anxiety, Self-Advocacy, and Promoting Yourself

Over the last 10 years (and really, her entire life), Tracy’s struggled with anxiety while running her own business, navigating negotiations, and self-publishing several books. This keynote will go through recommendations for keeping your sanity in a dog eat dog world, reducing anxiety, feeling comfortable with negotiation, and above all, being the best advocate for yourself that you can be.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
39:28 DjangoCon US English 2017

Python & Spreadsheets

Spreadsheets are OFTEN terrible. They’re also everywhere! As one of the default forms of data exchange, learning to work with spreadsheets directly via Python can save time and effort. We’ll look at Openpyxl, a library that lets you do just that. We’ll look at at least two different (beginner-friendly)example cases: transforming one spreadsheet into another spreadsheet and converting a spreadsheet into JSON. I’ll also use my experience as a former accountant to highlight some of the issues around reading from and writing to a spreadsheet file and how you might deal with them. You MAY even learn to make new friends and grow the Python community! True Story!
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
44:29 DjangoCon US English 2017

Don't Use My Grid System (or any others)

I built Susy, a Sass grid system that can generate any grid technique you like — but I haven’t used it in years. I’ll show you how various grid systems work, and how to avoid using them. For those few cases where a grid really is required, we’ll talk about the best ways to roll your own, so you’re not relying on a bloated library to make decisions for you. We’ll also look at the new layout toys, from flexbox to CSS Grid, and how to get started with only a few lines of code. When to use floats, CSS Grid, flexbox, custom properties, and other techniques. How to make grid-math simple, and lose the grid-system. How to make existing grid-systems work for you, when you’re stuck with them.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
26:06 DjangoCon US English 2017

Type UWSGI; Press Enter; What Happens?

This talk is aiming right at professional or experienced amateur Django developers who want to learn about one of the core technologies used in modern web apps. We’ll do our best to make it accessible for all, but it’s going to be best to come in with working knowledge of web applications and a rough understanding of web servers. We’ll be covering how uWSGI serves Python web applications, how it manages workers and processes, and how it works with the operating system to handle networking. Our goal is to show how this works both in code and through abstractions, recognizing that different audience members are going to grasp things in different ways. The hope is that attendees will walk away with a working of knowledge of how their apps interact with the network and the operating system through uWSGI, and that a commonly-used but less-understood piece of software will become demystified.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
37:14 DjangoCon US English 2017

Accessibility Matters: Creating a Better Web

Overview This talk will go through accessibility concerns on the web through example sites and code with both good and bad accessibility to experience what some users have to struggle with daily. We will cover well-known concerns such as low vision/color blindness and deafness, as well as attention issues and autism, and discuss the limitations and abilities of various alternative input devices that people with motor control issues rely on. Short and long-term fixes will be demonstrated and taught, with the overall goal being that the participants leave knowing how to find and solve accessibility problems. Why Bother With Accessibility Not only should you want everyone to be able to easily use your site, but having an accessible website comes with a variety of benefits. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, around 19% of Americans have a disability, which is a large potential audience for any site. Many companies also fall under accessibility laws they might not even be aware cover their products, with lawsuits becoming more prevalent in recent years, and showing a good faith effort to improve your products’ accessibility can help keep your company out of hot water. Accessible web development also tends to lead to better UX and a happier user base. And, another plus: It will save devs time and frustration when they’re working with the code, since good HTML is enforced. Who This Talk Is For Anyone who wishes to learn more about accessibility. While we won’t be going over the absolute basics of accessibility in detail, the examples and resources will be easy to understand for people with very basic knowledge of web development.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
38:03 DjangoCon US English 2017

Butter smooth, interactive applications with Django and Websockets

Web applications have changed significantly over the years – from simple static pages, to sprinkling interactiveness with JQuery/AJAX, to full dynamic single page apps. Through each evolution, we’re adding more complexity, more data and more asynchronous behavior to our applications. In this new world, where does the synchronous nature of Django’s request-response cycle fit in? My talk will focus on the topics around asynchronous Django applications. I’ll be sharing some lessons we learnt while building and scaling an interactive web application within the confines of Django and django-channels. This topic is interesting because there’s been a lot of interest with meteor-like frameworks that have synchronized state between the frontend and backend. My intention is to show the audience that you can accomplish the same end-result with Django, without the need to learn and deploy a brand new framework. An outline I have in mind: What does asynchrony mean, and why you need it. Traditional methods of achieving asynchrony (delayed jobs using worker queues like celery, long-polling for messaging, etc.) Why django-channels changes the game. How to architect your state. What are the available options for deployment. Gotchas, and what to do when things go wrong. Just a basic knowledge of Django is required, as the topics are transferable to other frameworks. We did not have to monkey-patch any of the drivers to achieve asynchrony, so what you’ll learn at my talk will apply cleanly to a stock Django.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
34:09 DjangoCon US English 2017

Why can't everyone just do what I want them to? Leadership, management, and working with people who don't think like you

Do you pride yourself on your post-it and Sharpie collection? Do you set appointments for yourself in your own calendar - that you actually show up for? Do you write to-do lists on your hand, since you’ll forget if the to-do isn’t right in front of your face? Do you own - and use - a label maker? Do you hate New Year’s resolutions because the whole idea of starting new habits on January 1 is an artificial construct? People are weird. We all have some pretty particular ways we think, work, and get motivated. It’s hard enough when we’re just trying to focus on ourselves, but it gets even more complicated when we add other people to the mix. What happens when a whiteboard person has to work with a spreadsheet person - or even harder, lead a whole team of spreadsheet people? This talk will focus on practical tips for working better with others - especially when you’re in a leadership or management position, although we all lead in different ways. We’ll start off with an overview of productivity and motivational styles, identifying how they influence the way we all think and work. Then, we’ll pinpoint how our own personal productivity and motivational styles impact us and those around us. After that, we’ll figure out how to look for clues about our colleagues’ working styles. Finally, we’ll talk about strategies for bridging our working styles with those of the people around us. You’ll leave with insights about what makes you tick, plus actionable tools to improve your leadership skills and enhance your working relationships.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
40:49 DjangoCon US English 2017

DjangoCon US 2017: Lightning Talks Day 2

  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
43:25 DjangoCon US English 2017

Functional Programming in an Imperative World. Maybe

The pillars of FP Let’s start by looking at the core concepts that differentiate FP from the OO / imperative style most programmers are familiar with. Along the way I’ll introduce you to: Immutable data structures. Having data structures that don’t change makes your code safer, especially when dealing with concurrency and parallelism, but they require you to approach solutions in a different way than you would with mutable data. “Pure” functions. Pure, or idempotent, functions do not mutate state or cause other kinds of side effects. As a result, you are guaranteed that every time you call a function with the same parameters, you will always get the same value. Recursion: While recursion is something most of us know about, it’s not something we tend to use often in imperative programming, and with good reason. Nonetheless, it’s a worth knowing about it’s various forms. Function composition. When you have pure functions that handle only one task, you can build larger, more complex and more beneficial programs by composing functions together to form new functions. First class functions: passing around functions as parameters and return values, just like any other object. The holy trinity: map, reduce, filter. These three functions are the work horses of FP, helping us manipulate and transform data quickly and elegantly. FP in python Now, let’s take a look at how we can or cannot apply these concepts in python. While most data structures in python are mutable, tuples are a built in immutable data structure that we have at our disposal. We’ll see that tuples have a solid place in python, but they’re not as easy to work with as we might like. Recursion isn’t really well developed in python (on purpose) so let’s take a look at it’s pitfalls and how to avoid them. Function composition is something you probably already do some in python and perhaps don’t even know it. The trinity: Filter is easy, we just call it “list comprehension” Reduce. Let’s try to get beyond flattening nested lists and doing tricks with math. Map. You probably don’t use this enough in python so let’s see if we can change that. FP is great! Maybe. Now that we’ve seen how FP can be used, we really need to decide if it should be used. Python is not a functional programming language, despite the tools it has. We’ve talked about some of the technical drawbacks to these tools, but we also need to decide if working in an FP paradigm is right for our work environment. We’ll look at some examples of where running into FP can be jarring and talk about the additional cognitive load on co-workers who aren’t used to seeing these tools in place.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
42:19 DjangoCon US English 2017

Alexa...

As the universe of IoT continues to grow at a rapid pace, our abilities to interact with these devices can be useful. As an added bonus, developing these skills can be fun too! I’ll take you through my journey of developing my first Alexa skill in Python for Amazon Echo devices aptly named Happy Days. It is a random quote generator that delivers positive quotes. I’ll go over the skills of how to get Python to talk to Alexa and how to dump that code into Lambda for a seamless delivery between Amazon Web Services and the Alexa Skills Kit in just a little over 200 lines! Never developed an Alexa skill before? Don’t worry, I hadn’t either. I’ll provide plenty of resources to help get you started on a path you’ll never want to leave as an Alexa developer. Building an Alexa skill helps: Further develop your own skills in Python. Gain familiarity with Amazon Web Services’ Lambda service which allows you to run code without provisioning or managing servers. BYOC - Bring your own code! (Python, Node.js, Java, and C#). Gain familiarity with Amazon Web Services CloudWatch service which helps monitor and log activities with your Amazon Web Services resources which is helpful for troubleshooting. Gain familiarity with the Alexa Skills Kit which is the platform behind Alexa development. Learn about tools and resources you can take advantage of to ensure you have a meaningful development experience. Learn how to “talk” to the Alexa Skills Kit through your Python code. Helpful reminder that user experience is key!
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
34:16 DjangoCon US English 2017

DjangoCon US 2017: Lightning Talks Day 1

  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
27:44 DjangoCon US English 2017

Saved you a click (or three): Supercharging the Django admin with actions and views

  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
40:53 DjangoCon US English 2017

Opening Keynote - Is it too late to learn how to program?

Alicia will discuss the challenges she faced as an African American woman in becoming an iOS developer at the age of 51. As a self-taught developer, she created a mobile app dedicated to helping victims escape domestic violence and abuse. She has seen the best and worst of the tech community. As demonstrated by her app, she believes that the tech industry can improve and change lives if we open our arms, embrace change, and think about how women can change the way we see and create apps.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
42:54 DjangoCon US English 2017

The 10 Commandments of Community Organizing

Welcome to the advanced class on community organizing. You’ve got a decent amount of members in your Meetup.com group, you hold events fairly routinely, maybe you’ve pulled in some legit speakers at your last conference or event … and you want to do more. This talk will focus on community organizing for growth and longevity by building out teams, improving communications, implementing processes, and most importantly will discuss how to maintain sanity in your work-life-volunteer balance. If you’ve ever had to answer the question “Oh, this ISN’T your full time job???” - this talk is definitely for you. If you’re just starting out organizing and don’t want to fall flat on your face, this talk will be very pragmatic for you.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
24:15 DjangoCon US English 2017

Django vs Flask

When it comes to web development in Python, Django isn’t the only game in town. Flask is a scrappy young framework that takes a very different approach – whereas Django ships with tons of features ready and eager to be used, Flask provides a bare minimum feature-set with rock-solid extensibility and incredible flexibility. This talk, given by a web developer who has experience with both frameworks, takes a good look at the pros and cons for both Flask and Django. If you’ve ever felt that Django is too hard to learn, or too inflexible, this is the talk for you! Outline What is Flask? Historical background Django vs Flask Ideological differences Example “hello, world” websites Database support Django ORM vs SQLAlchemy, Peewee, etc… Non-relational databases User model django.contrib.auth vs Flask-Login, Flask-Principle Django Admin vs Flask-Admin Django apps vs Flask Blueprints Django REST Framework & comparisons to Flask Which is better? Depends on your use-case.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
29:32 DjangoCon US English 2017

Flourishing FLOSS: Making Your Project Successful

You maintain an Open Source project with great code? Yet your project isn’t succeeding in the ways you want? Maybe you’re struggling with funding or documentation? Or you just can’t find new contributors and you’re drowning in issues and pull requests? Open Source is made up of many components and we are often better-trained in methods for writing good code, than in methods for succeeding in the other dimensions we want our project to grow. In this talk we’ll explore the different components of an Open Source project and how they work together. After this talk you’ll be well-equipped with a ideas and strategies for growing, cultivating, and nourishing your Open Source project. For your project to succeed, all of its non-code components must be well-maintained. What are these different components and what methods can we learn to maintain them? Build real relationships with your sponsors and determine ways how both sides can benefit from this relationship, don’t just ask people for money. Establish a good communication system with your contributors: Keep them informed, listen to their feedback and input, make them feel heard. Thank the people who worked on ticket triage or marketing, not just those who wrote code, in your release notes. Make it easy for new contributors to get started: Write and maintain good documentation, answer questions in a friendly and timely manner. Market and evangelize in the right places and at the right time: Give conference talks, organize sprints, keep your project’s Twitter account active, always curate new and interesting content on your blog or website. Implement a Code of Conduct and enforce it if needed: Make your project a safe space to contribute for everyone. With these methods and a half-dozen others, you’ll handle beautifully all the components your project needs to succeed. Outline Introduction - Who am I? What is this talk about? What is Open Source? Overview of the different components that make up an Open Source project Growing, cultivating, and nourishing your Open Source project - Or how to make your project more successful Operations Funding Marketing Branding Evangelism Documentation Community Diversity Contributors Cultivating new contributors Keeping current contributors happy Communication Efficient and sustainable processes Ticket triage Managing the pull request queue Main takeaways Q&A.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
22:48 DjangoCon US English 2017

Files in Django

One of the most confusing parts of Django for newcomers (and some old hands alike!) is the handling of files. Among the 10+ settings, static vs user uploaded distinction, and plethora of deployment options it’s no wonder that many people end up cargo-culting their production settings. The API overview Short introduction Go over the difference between static & media files Run through the File abstraction and the various settings Django Storage API, collectstatic etc Production & Development configuration Whitenoise/dj-static/Nginx for static files Cloud storage providers for media & static files (S3 etc, mention some popular libraries such as django-storages) CDNs Implement a storage engine together & the future Implementation - practicing what we just learned to solidify understanding Closing remarks and mention possible future Django developments.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
31:05 DjangoCon US English 2017

Hunter2: A Symphony of Password Horror

The year is 2017. We have hoverboards, jetpacks, solar-powered cars, and also so many awful passwords that it’s become trivial for pretty much anyone to have their accounts compromised. We’ve got passwords for our passwords. Eight-year-olds with a dictionary and a set of dice can generate mathematically stronger passwords than most corporations that have your credit card details. We spend our days wandering through endless forests of requirements to come up with something that contains no more than twelve letters, a special character, the eye of a newt, and at least one uppercase letter, only to be emailed it back in plaintext if you forget it. And then it goes on a Post-It note on a monitor. Do not despair - this talk is here to help! From beginners to experts, all technical folk have the power to build a post-password future. Lilly, an engineer and historian, will guide you through the history of how we got ourselves into this state, and explain why major companies still think that the best way to keep your stuff secure is to poke their heads out of the tree-house and ask you for the secret word. She will then hand you strong technical tools to help your clients and colleagues understand why there are better things out there than “Welcome1!”, and help you work together to bring a small ray of sunshine into our password-saturated world.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
23:43 DjangoCon US English 2017

Getting the most out of Django’s User Model

Django’s User model is nice, but the fields it provides out of the box are minimal. We frequently need to associate our own custom data with a user, and luckily Django provides ways for us to add to its built-in User model. This talk will help novice Django developers understand which options are best when it comes to getting the most out of the Django User model. I’ll start by talking about the built-in Django User model and what it has to offer. Then I will identify scenarios when the User model might not be enough for a project, and why someone might want something with more flexibility. Then we’ll look at the different ways to get the most out of the Django User model. There are two main methods I’ll cover: Extending the User model Creating a custom User model Extending the User model: Extending the User model is handy when you only need to add a few extra fields. There are two main ways to do this: using a proxy model, and using a OneToOneField. I will cover the pros and cons of each, and give examples for implementing each. Creating a custom User model: With this method, you can substitute Django’s default User model with your own. Though more complex, a custom User model is particularly useful when you need to uniquely identify users by email address instead of by username. I’ll go into a couple more scenarios where a custom User model would be helpful, and show examples of implementation. Lastly, I will show how each method works with the default Django admin, and how they can be managed there.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
21:25 DjangoCon US English 2017

Tasks: you gotta know how to run 'em, you gotta know how to safe' em

Web developers often find themselves in situations where server processing takes longer than a user would accept. One very common situation is when sending emails. Although simple and relatively quick task, it requires the communication with an external service. In this situation, it’s not possible to foresee how long that service will take to answer. Not to mention the many unexpected situations that can arise, such as errors and bugs. The solution to this problem is to delegate long lasting tasks while responding quickly to the user. This is the point where we need async tasks. There are some tools available that can assist in this job. In this talk, you will learn about the concepts, caveats and best practices for when developing async tasks. For this, I will use Python’s most popular tool for the task: Celery. Rundown: Setting the context (~3 min) The architecture (~3 min) Brokers Workers Use cases (~2 min) External calls Long computations Data caching Tools available (~1 min) Celery (~16 min) Callbacks Canvas Logging Retrying Monitoring Tests and debugging.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
24:19 DjangoCon US English 2017

Maybe Not the Programmers They Deserved, but the Programmers They Needed

We read to know we are not alone Is there something you would change in the world if you were a wizard? Make vulnerability your cloak Make determination your hat Make code your wand What do you care about? We care about girls and women being enabled to choose their future We care about increasing diversity in the trade we love We care about arming children with the confidence that they can do anything Why are we here? We’re trying to use our programming skills to make that a reality. It’s a journey, one we invite you to join for whatever you feel strongly about. We were not the first, we were definitely not the best, and we won’t be the last. But sometimes, inspiring people to help is just as hard (or harder) than helping. We wanted to give this talk to show others that it CAN be done and YOU can make a difference - regardless of your skill level or experience. Our Story 1. The Use Case Listening: “I’ve been wanting to teach Python for a while but we don’t have anyone.” - Girl Scout Leader Acting: “I can do that!” - [Presenter 1] (even though she was pretty sure the ideal person was way more experienced than her) Deliverable: The Hackathon - A Python challenge for both beginner and advanced coders. Two classes, 25 girls each, ages 10-18 years old. 2. A Master Plan Check out our options: We reviewed existing resources, but didn’t find anything to meet our needs (list some of the good resources we found and were inspired by) Make a decision: “Let’s write our own!” - [Presenters] (because nothing that’s out there fits in two hours…) Have a Cool Learning Experience: Coding the game and taking our first stabs at writing the tutorial were great learning opportunities for us! 3. The Dream Team (AKA: Help!) The Pair Programmers: Gaining perspective and tripling productivity, Megan and Jessica start figuring out what to teach and begin making the tutorial come to life The Project Manager: Added for some very necessary skills - making things looking professional, doing a code freeze, checking our spelling, and making sure the presentation is consistent The Coaching Team: With a common goal and united front, an all female team of software developers, engineers and IT managers unite to form a coaching group! 4. Go Live Hot Fixes: The girls begin the tutorial and questions come rolling in. Confusion abounds. They don’t know what a Start button is! Nothing shows them their opinion matters like change, so we began live editing the tutorial! Being vulnerable, admitting imperfection, and not taking it personally evolved the tutorial in real time to fit our audience. It also gave the girls a sense of inclusion that was priceless; even though they weren’t writing the code to make the edits, their voice was heard and their suggestions were implemented in real time - a powerful way to build confidence! Unexpected Popularity: The girls were engaged! Among raised and waving hands and the din of voices, we kept our cool and took each issue one step at a time. Frankly, we were all a little in shock. Better than we imagined: We might have expected too little of ourselves, but when all was said and done - the girls felt successful, they were all engaged, and their parents were inspired to learn for themselves or keep their girls involved with code going forward! 5. Refactoring Simplification: It was late and everyone was tired - make things simpler, have more milestones, include more affirmations Organization: Planning pre- and post- tutorial huddles to get to know each other and set expectations, figuring out how to guide/redirect parents who were doing the tutorial for their child, investigate letting the girls try pair programming Keep Building: We are still working to evolve our tutorial, make it more accessible, make it friendlier for our target age group, make it packaged to shared, and shopping it around to other tutorials as an expansion (we’re looking at you DjangoGirls ;) ) 6. An Ever Expanding Universe Sharing is caring: We did it and so can you! Expanding the number of contributors as well as the project scope will only make things better! So, we will share our code, share out tutorial, share our experiences, and share our enthusiasm with anyone who wants to make a change! The Takeaways You have a lot of power, in the you code help create, in the people you mentor Don’t wait for someone else, endowed with imaginary super coding/people skills, to help create the change you want -do what needs to be done Don’t try to be a panacea, focus on a single thing and do it well Contact us! Let us know if you’re interested in building something or want to do something similar to what we did Act.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
24:04 DjangoCon US English 2017

Stumbling Through Django and How Not To

If you’re a beginner about to embark on a new Django project adventure, this talk is for you. When I started my first Django project, I took the “Sure, I think I can figure that out” approach, which is fun! And also dangerous. But exciting! And also horrible because I caused myself a lot of trouble and barfed on my keyboard. (Metaphorically.) Oops. My hope for this talk is to pass along lessons I learned the hard way, and save the world. Or at least prevent some frustration. :) We’ll talk about version control, structuring your project, and how to handle top secret stuff. We’ll also talk about throwing house parties without causing anaphylaxis, pregnant daddy seahorses, velociraptors, and friends. I promise all of that is related to Django.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
14:42 DjangoCon US English 2017

Orientation Event

  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
20:38 DjangoCon US English 2017

The shy person's guide to tech conferences

  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: DjangoCon US
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.8.0 (dec2fe8b0ce2e718d55d6f23ab68f0b2424a1f3f)