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54:45 re:publica English 2010

Radical Critique of Free Culture

  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
55:25 re:publica English 2010

Freedom of expression in the net

"Freedom of expression is for most participants of the re:publica a completely natural right. In many other nations freedom of expression and information outlets are restricted from cititzens. The panel will discuss this situation: What is life like in nations with a strong net censorship and government control of news flow? Which experiences do bloggers make when they point out misdoings? Inspite of the control, how can one use the internet to express their opinions freely, to network and inform oneself?"
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
31:41 re:publica English 2010

Technology for Transparency

"Transparency as a cure for the ills of modern democracy has become such a highly prized concept that the word was banned from use at Michigans Lake Superior State University due to mis-use, over-use, and general uselessness. Such lexical protests havent stopped hundreds of websites from popping up all over the world, grounded in the belief that making government information more accessible to ordinary citizens through sexy web 2.0 interfaces will lead to greater accountability of elected officials and improved governance. But is this the reality? Do we have any concrete proof that technology projects which aim to promote transparency and civic engagement have an actual political and social impact? By looking at case studies of some of the most innovative technology for transparency projects from Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa we will evaluate their effectiveness, aggregate their best ideas, and make suggestions for future improvements."
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
1:01:24 re:publica German 2010

Feministische Netzkultur 2.0

"The revolution will be blogged oder doch nicht? Seit 2005 mit dem Genderblog das erste größer angelegte deutschsprachige Gemeinschaftsblog rund um feministische und queere Themen gegründet wurde, folgten viele weitere erfolgreiche feministische Blogs. Das 2006 gegründete Mädchenblog oder die Mädchenmannschaft, welches 2007 startete, haben mittlerweile einen ähnlichen Bekanntheitsgrad erlangt, und aus Österreich berichtet dieStandard.at seit 2000 auf hohem journalistischen Niveau über nicht nur für Frauen relevante Themen. Obwohl die deutschen Blogcharts maßgeblich von von Männern betriebenen Blogs dominiert werden, hat sich so eine immer populärer werdende Nische mit feministischen Inhalten gebildet. Spätestens mit Deutschlands erstem feministischen Magazin über Popkultur, dem Missy Magazine, haben so feministische Inhalte den Sprung in etablierte Medien geschafft. Doch bedeuten die gepriesenen Weiten des Internets auch unendliche Möglichkeiten? Journalistische Arbeit im Blogformat verspricht viele Freiheiten, birgt aber auch einige Risiken: So sind feministische Interventionen sehr einfach möglich, werden aber auch regelmäßig mit Kommentarkriegen und antifeministischen Anfeindungen abgestraft. So berichtete bereits auf der re:publica09 die Mädchenmannschaft über eigene Erfahrungen und Chancen des feministischen Bloggens und rief zur On- und Offlinevernetzung von bloggenden Feminist innen auf. Nun stellt sich die neue, junge Szene die Frage: Wo soll es hingehen mit der neuen Bewegung? Ist die Sichtbarkeit feministischer Inhalte im Netz gestiegen? Geht es nur um Gegenöffentlichkeit oder wird der Schritt weiter in Richtung Kampagnenfähigkeit gewagt? Reicht das Web2.0 als Vernetzungsintrument oder sollen die Netzwerke auch offline weiter ausgebaut werden? Sollen (angehende) Feminist innen nur Empowerment erfahren oder werden die Blogs im Zuge der neuen Medienmacht gar feministische Macht- und Druckinstrumente? In diesem Panel wollen Vertreter innen von Mädchenmannschaft, Mädchenblog, Genderblog, Missy Magazine und dieStandard.at miteinander und mit allen Interessierten ebendiese Chancen, Risiken und aktuelle Entwicklungen von queer-feministischen Blogs und Online-Medien besprechen."
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: German
28:59 re:publica English 2010

Saving the planet vs. Privacy

Smart Metering, GPS-based road taxes, Personal Carbon Credits – the next wave of “green” technology aims to reduce energy consumption and emissons, and ultimately save the planet by making personal behaviour transparent and quantifiable. While reducing everyones ressource footprint is unavoidable, the currently proposed methods to achieve that goal are highly questionable. This talk gives an overview on currently planned and proposed technologies and outlines alternatives to telling Google when you do your loundry and having every purchase tracked in a central carbon credit database. These technologies are designed and build now, by the people from our community. So here is the chance to built privacy and acvoidance of the next data scandals right into the foundation of a new industry.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
26:33 re:publica English 2010

Innovators by the fire

Diskussionsrunde "Innovators by the fire - Was macht eure Ideen erfolgreich"
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
1:07:00 re:publica English 2010

Netzkulturen und Gegenöffentlichkeit

What is Web 2.0 anyway? Is it useful to run after the latest hypes of Facebook and Twitter? Are there alternatives? What forms of ‘networking’ could grass roots campaigns and social movements use in oder to broaden and strenghen their political work?
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
57:13 re:publica English 2010

Re:campaign - Online Strategies for NGOs

Should I build a Facebook page? How do I raise money online? What is the best way to build an engage a community of supporters? What is the best investment of my online budget and staff time? Since 1998, Care2 has worked with over 500 nonprofit organisations to help them recruit millions of advocates and donors online from around the world. Join Justin Perkins of Care2 as he shares best practices learned from working with some of the top campaigning organisations in the world, and from Care2.com’s management of its own global online social network of 13 million conscious consumers.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
18:33 re:publica English 2010

Mobile augmented reality

We are right at the dawn of this new experience medium called augmented reality. It`s so great beause of three things: It combines the real and the virtual, it`s interactive and realtime, and it`s 3D. These days augmented reality is finally going mobile. We can see augmented reality applications for handheld devices being created all over the planet. Mobile technology allows us to put information into it’s original context: location. We want to shed some light on mobile augmented reality technology and learn about best practices that have been created on top of the Layar mobile augmented reality platform.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
33:19 re:publica English 2010

Maptivism: Maps for activism transparency and engagement

It is estimated that as much as 80% of data contains geo-referenced information. Maps have a long history and since its early days maps have been used for many types of activism. Digital maps allow easy ways to present large amounts of data and reduce complexity. Activists around the world have found creative ways to use maps for advocacy. The session will showcase examples from around the world and highlight different approaches to maptivism.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
50:00 re:publica English 2010

The politics of Deep-Packet-Inspections

An overview of different Use-Cases for DPI, the various methods of regulation and several associated political campaigns for the future of the internet.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
53:01 re:publica English 2010

Free Culture in Brasil

"April 8th, 2010 was an important date for Brazil. That is when a draft bill named Marco Civil was launched, aiming to protect fundamental rights online, such as privacy, freedom of expression, net neutrality, open standards, and open governmental data. Looking from the outside, that might seem natural for a country like Brazil, which is internationally known for being supprtive to the idea of free culture. However, that is not the full story. My talk is going to describe the fierce debates and struggles inside Brazil that led to the proposal of the Marco Civil. It will show how the Marco Civil became a response to years of national and international pressures for the radicalization and criminalization of the internet. For many years, other draft bills had been proposed (and almost approved), creating crimal conducts such as unlocking a cell phone, punishable with up to 4 years in jail. Or yet, simply prohibiting the use of the internet in political campaigns. I will describe how these radical proposals ended-up mobilizing the Brazilian civil society to claim for more balanced laws. The Marco Civil establishes probably one of the first collaborative legislations sponsored by a government. It was through a process of open public participation (available at www.culturadigital.org/marcocivil), divided into 90 days. For the first 45, an online discussion took place about the principles that should govern the new law. More than 800 substantial comments were received, from private and public interest groups. Based on those comments, the text of the law was then drafted, and opened again (on April 8th, 2010) for public participation. The final text will then be consolidated, and officially introduced to Congress. In short, the Marco Civil might be an important inspiration for other countries facing the trends of radicalization and criminalization of internet-related laws. In my talk, I will describe how we got there."
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
30:48 re:publica English 2010

Do censorship and repression kill content on the Web?

What happen to websites and blogs after they get blocked? Do arrested and threatened bloggers and digital activists stop their online activities once they face a governmental threat?
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
1:34:21 re:publica German 2010

Lotus Jam Lab

Online Jams sind von IBM schon häufig durchgeführte Online-Diskussionen, um Ideen, Gedanken und Vorschläge vieler Teilnehmer zu sammeln, zu besprechen und zu analysieren. In verschiedenen Themensträngen – Idea Spaces genannt – werden Ideen gesammelt und diskutiert. Das Thema Smarter Work (Wie sieht der Arbeitsplatz der Zukunft aus?) wird im Fokus des Lotus JamCamps stehen. Kompetente Referenten geben Impulse. Und Sie sollen mitmachen. Im Jam, bei der Bustour und vor Ort. Auf dem JamCamp wird es nicht um Werbung für Produkte gehen. Wir wollen Inhalte entwickeln und diskutieren.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: German
37:26 re:publica English 2010

Net neutrality and threats to fundamental rights in europe

Yet, entertainment industries see the Net as a threat to their existing business models, mostly based on controlling distribution channels of information. Worse, telecom operators see new opportunities in monetizing restrictions to Internet access. The interests of both groups are now converging with the help of a portion of the political class wary of the way the Net upsets their objective of controlling the public sphere so as to retain power. Several legislative projects are contemplating different ways of restricting access to the Net: from the provisions on operators’ contracts in the “Telecoms Package” directives to website blocking in the name of child protection, from the ongoing war against file sharing lead by the entertainment industries in Europe to the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement currently being negotiated at the global level… Restrictions to our access to the Net, from the most obvious (cutoff in the “HADOPI” law in France, censorship in China), to the most subtle (blocking of selected aplications or services, bandwidth prioritization or reduction, etc.) are as many restrictions to our fundamental freedoms, including the most essential freedom of expression. Are these different regulatory projects turning into a global war on the Internet, therefore a war on our freedoms? What is the state of the play? What can we do as citizens?
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
55:56 re:publica German 2010

Leistungsschutzrecht

Diskussion auf der re:publica 2010 mit Matthias Spielkamp, Meike Richter, Robin Meyer-Lucht und Till Kreutzer zum Leistungsschutzrecht mit dem Titel "Let's screw up the entire internet to save newspapers.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: German
55:02 re:publica English 2010

Free Press & Save the Internet

  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
1:28:04 re:publica English 2010

The BOBs - The truth about the international blogosphere

Discover global blogs and the winners of the Deutsche Welle Blog Awards
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
58:32 re:publica English 2010

The German Paradox

"When we worry too much about protecting privacy, we risk losing the benefits of publicness that the internet brings us. Ill argue that we, the public, must protect whats public."
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
49:27 re:publica English 2010

Digital Natives with a cause?

As a growing population in emerging Information Societies, particularly in Asia, experience a lifestyle mediated by digital technologies, there is also a correlated concern about the young digital natives constructing their identities and expressions through a world of incessant consumption, while remaining apathetic to the immediate political and social needs of their times. Governments, educators, civil society theorists and practitioners, have all expressed alarm at how the digital natives across the globe are so entrenched in practices of incessant consumption that they have a disconnect with the larger external reality and contained within digital deliriums. They discard the emergent communication and expression trends, mobilisation and participation platforms, and processes of cultural production as trivial or unimportant. Such a perspective is embedded in a non-changing view of the political landscape and do not take into account that the Digital Natives are engaging in practices which might not necessarily subscribe to the earlier notions of political revolution, but offer possibilities for great social transformation and participation. The oldest Digital Native in the world – if popular definitions of Digital Natives are accepted – turned 30 this year, whereas the youngest is not yet born. In the last three decades, a population has been growing up born in technologies, and mediated their sense of self and their interactions with external reality through digital and internet technologies. These interactions lead to significant transitions in the landscape of the social and political movements as the Digital Natives engage and innovate with new technologies to respond to crises in their local and immediate environments. However, more often than not, these experiments remain invisible to the mainstream discourses. The mechanics, aesthetics and manifestation of these localised and contextual practices hold the potentials for social transformation and political participation for the future. This presentation looks at three different case studies to look at how, through processes and productions which have largely been neglected as self indulgent or frivolous, Digital Natives around the world are actively participating in the politics of their times, and also changing the way in which we understand the political processes of mobilisation, participation and transformation.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
59:43 re:publica English 2010

Sex and the Internet

"Exposure. Connection. Pleasure. Its axiomatic that sex has driven mass adoption of the internet as a communications and publishing platform. But how does the internet in turn shape personal, social, and political expressions of sexuality? Looking back on the last ten years of the web — from the birth of blogging and the dot-com bust to the rise of social networking and moral panics around internet prostitution and amateur pornography — writer and activist Melissa Gira Grant will tease out key questions and propose a model for engaging with sex on the internet not as an online red light district to police to the margins, but as something central to our collective condition."
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
56:53 re:publica English 2010

Mobile Activism in Africa

The spread of mobile technologies has opened new opportunities for social and political activism in Africa. During the past years, the world has witnessed the spread of innovative tools around the world, developed in Africa. Crowdsourcing tools such as Frontline SMS and Ushahidi have attracted international media attention and are being used by organizations around the world today. This is a true shift in paradigm away from the classical model of technologies from the west being brought to Africa to foster development. Who are the people developing and using such solutions in Africa? What impact does the spread and use of such tools have – for instance on making information available, mobilizing for campaigns and political actions? Two experts will share their experiences and thoughts on these questions: Sokari Ekine does not only write one of the most read blogs written by a woman in Africa, but is also editor of the book “SMS Uprising – Mobile Activism in Africa”. She will present the case studies and contents of this work and share insights from her own blogging experience in Nigeria. Victor Miclovich is one of the developers in the Ushahidi team and currently developing a new innovation: Swift River – a crowdsourcing tool to verify news and information which he will present at the re:publica.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
1:02:15 re:publica English 2010

Obama Agonistes

In 2008, Barack Obama rode a wave of mass political participation to become the first African-American President in the United States. His campaign was widely described as a model for integrating bottom-up grassroots support–online and offline–with traditional top-down marketing. And his administration promised to transform government by making it more open, participatory and collaborative. How much has Obama delivered on these promises? And how much did he really change American politics? In this talk, Micah Sifry, co-founder of the Personal Democracy Forum and editor of techPresident.com will look at the myths, and realities, of Obama the candidate and president.
  • Published: 2010
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
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