Show filters Hide filters

Refine your search

Publication Year
Author & Contributors
1-36 out of 117 results
Change view
  • Sort by:
26:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Trying to visualize GIS & BIM information on the web: a solution using Leaflet and Cesium

While GIS is a term whose use has now been consolidated for years now, BIM is a term whose use is increasingly widespread over the past few years. The both deal with geo-localized "objects", so the ongoing studies for a common point of the GIS and BIM different views of the same object is somewhat unavoidable. A first attempt at integration information belonging from these two worlds is presently under way in the framework of EU funded DIMMER project. This project integrates BIM, district level 3D models with near-real time data from sensors and user feedback in order to analyze and correlate buildings utilization, and to provide information about energy-related behaviors to users and other stakeholders. From the point of view of technology, the project uses open source technologies such as Java, Leaflet and Cesium, as far as GIS is concerned: here you're an architectural schema. The web application integrated GIS data read directly from a POSTGIS data base, with data flows from BIM services, near-real time data from sensors distributed over the territory under examination, and on line processed indexes/calculations. The present version of the project makes it possible to consult sensor information in near-real time, as well as the other processed calculations/indexes, through a web dashboard that includes as primary elements both a 2D map (based on Leaflet), as well as a 3D map (based on CesiumJS).
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:15 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Create Vector Tiles from OpenStreetMap

The OSM2VectorTiles project offers free downloadable vector tiles ready to use by people interested in hosting custom base maps on their own infrastructure. The whole world fits on a USB stick and can be served from an ordinary web hosting and styled and enriched to make beautiful and fast maps for web and mobile applications. The advantages of vector tiles over traditional raster tiles are well known. There are already a handful of vector tile provider present, but they may not always serve your use case optimally. After this talk you will know how to create your own custom vector tiles based on OpenStreetMap and will know the tools and processes you need to use. The talk will cover how to import OpenStreetMap data into PostGIS and then shows how to generate vector tiles using Tilelive and Mapnik. We will present the open source workflow we use at OSM2VectorTiles to prerender global vector tiles and instruct you how to adapt the workflow to create custom vector tiles. Thanks to Docker and tools such as Mapnik, PostGIS, Tilelive and Mapbox Studio Classic the process is straightforward and repeatable. Manuel Roth (HSR University of Applied Science Rapperswil Switzerland) Lukas Martinelli (HSR University of Applied Sciences Rapperswil Switzerland) Petr Pridal (Klokan Technologies GmbH)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Leveraging Big Geo Data through Metadata

The increase in the scale of traditional data sources, along with an explosion in the availability of sensor data, have originated massive volumes of data, a great deal of which is actually geolocated. This is partly due to the wide adoption of cheaper position technologies, and to the exponential growing of Volunteered Geographic Geographic Information (VGI) movements, which rely on crowdsourcing approaches. Big Data has generated a lot of interest amongst industry, the developer community and the public in general, and it has been at the core of many technology innovations which took place recently (e.g.: NoSQL, MapReduce); these new approaches already started to involve the geo community with projects such as the ESRI Spatial Framework for Hadoop or GeoTrellis, just to mention a few. However, the focus has been mostly on storing data (at the infrastructure level) and using data (at the analysis level), leaving aside challenges such as discoverability, integration or security. In this talk, we will address some of these outstanding challenges through the use of metadata and the semantic web, and show how the use of a decentralized and standardized catalog can help to unlock the five V's of Big Data: Volume, Velocity, Variety, Veracity, and most importantly, Value.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Interoperability with OpenLayers 3

This talk will focus on the many ways that OpenLayers 3 can integrate with different systems out there. Some of the abilities are integrated into the library itself, think of open standards such as WMS, WMTS, KML, GeoJSON. Other ways to provide integration is through external libraries such as ole, which integrates with Esri ArcGIS REST services (Map Services and Feature Services), or JSONIX to provide parsing (and serialisation) of a huge amount of OGC standards.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

QWCII: A new QGIS Web Client

QGIS Web Client (QWC) is a Web-GIS client based on OpenLayers 2 and ExtJS and tailored to use special extensions of QGIS Server, such as extracting information from QGIS Project settings, extended GetFeatureInfo Requests, GetPrint and DXF export. It uses standard WMS/WFS commands, but extends them where needed. QWC is used by several cities and provinces in Europe. There are four main reasons why QWC needs to be overhauled: The code structure is not very modular and should be better structured. QWC only works well on Desktops. Despite a separate mobile web client based on OpenLayers 3 and jQuery Mobile, for maintenance reasons it would be much better to have a single web client that uses responsive design and works for all devices from a single viewer. The base libraries ExtJS 3.4 and Openlayers 2 have been phased out and there are newer versions available. However, the upgrade to the newer versions is not trivial. Having a more modern foundation based on newer web technologies This presentation discusses the requirements, the progress of this project, technical decisions taken and challenges solved during the project. While the first goal of the project is to establish a modern foundation for the coming years and reach feature parity with the old QWC project, it is already planned to implement a QWCII python plugin that offers a GUI and assists with the global configuration of the client. This tool should also facilitate the management of topics and projects.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

GeoServer in Production: we do it, here is how!

The presentation will describe how to setup a production system based on GeoServer from the points of view of performance, availability and security. The suggestions will start covering how a single node GeoServer should be prepared for internet usage, tuning logging, connection pools, security, data and JVM preparation, keeping disk, memory and CPU usage in check within the limits of the available resources. We’ll then move to tools used to monitor the production instances, ranging from probes to request auditing and watch-dogs. Finally the presentation will cover setting up a cluster of server and the strategies for keeping them in synch, from the traditional multi-tier setup (testing vs production) to the systems that need to keep an ever evolving catalog of layers constantly on-line and in synch.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:19 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Processing Copernicus Sentinel data with GRASS GIS

Markus Neteler (mundialis GmbH & Co KG) Carmen Tawalika (mundialis)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Integration testing of Web Mapping applications (including web mapping server) using Python

When you are developing applications, you need to write tests. A unit test is a test written by the programmer to verify that small piece of code is doing what it is intended to do. The tests are intended for the use of the programmer. An integration test on the other hand is done to demonstrate that different pieces of the system work together. Integration tests cover whole applications, and they require much more effort to put together. The integration tests do a more convincing job of demonstrating the system works than a set of unit tests can. Unit tests can be great but they tightly couple your tests to your code, making it really fragile and anti Agile. We will show integration testing of web mapping applications using Python bindings to Selenium browser automation tool. We can test JavaScript application from Python environment, using standard unittest module. Since Python is very easy to be used and it's very universal language, it's easy to be learned by non-programming co-workers, who can automate application tests and help the developers with testing. Using integration tests in continuous integration development, enables us to be more agile, making sure that both parts - frontend and backend remain integrated even bigger refactoring occures. Part of testing is also background data services, with new project called WMSChecker. This is used in our Jenkins environment, so that system administrators can have overview about current status of running custom nad 3rd party services.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

How the Land Administration community profits from Open Source

The Social Tenure Domain Model (STDM) is a concept, model and information tool to map people-to-land relationships. STDM is developed and maintained by the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) under the lead of the UN Habitat. The data model was closely aligned with LADM, an ISO standard on Land Management followed by most implementers. When it came to implementing the software tool the GLTN group decided against reinventing the wheel but to check out existing Open Source components (as maintained by the OSGeo Foundation) and Open Standards (as maintained by the OGC). So basically everything from the data model, technology standards and up to all the tools required to do proper Land Administration is already there. But it is too complex for non-technical people to grapple with. Therefore the GLTN group started to implement a software package which shipped with the right data model for the Postgres and PostGIS database, the desktop software QGIS, reporting tools and comprehensive documentation. This presentation will give an overview of the software tool and underlying components to give participants with limited technological background a better understanding of how it works and how they can also profit from the abundance of great Open Source software that is out there.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Development of a new framework for Distributed Processing of Big Geospatial Data

The Geospatial world is still facing the lack of well-established distributed processing solutions tailored to the amount and heterogeneity of geodata, especially when fast data processing is a must. However, most current distributed computing frameworks have important limitations regarding both data distribution and data partitioning methods. Hence, this paper presents a prototype for tiling, stitching and processing of big geospatial data. The system is based on the IQLib concept developed in the frame of the IQmulus EU FP7 research and development project. The data distribution framework has no limitations on programming language environment and can execute scripts (and workflows) written in different development frameworks (e.g. Python, R or C#). It is capable of processing raster, vector and point cloud data. Our intention is to provide a solution to perform a wide range of geospatial processing capabilities in a distributed environment with no restrictions on data storage concepts. Our research covers methods controlling data partitioning, distributed processing and data assimilation as well. Partitioning (also referred to as “Tiling”) is a very delicate yet crucial step having impact on the whole processing. After algorithms have processed these “chunks” or “tiles” of data, partial results are collected to carry out data assimilation or “Stitching”. The paper presents the above-mentioned prototype through a case study dealing with country-wide processing of raster imagery. Assessment is carried out by comparing the results (computing time, accuracy, etc.) to concurrent solutions. Further investigations on algorithmic and implementation details are in focus for the near future.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Enterprise Single Sign-On in GeoServer: where do we stand?

Security is a major concern in the enterprise and treats all aspects of identity and access management. Moreover the proliferation of devices and digital assets connected to the Internet of Things is a massive source of growing geographic information. GeoServer has buit-in a lot of features to manage authentication and authorization but often this kind of problem can be better dealt with a dedicated tool (i.e. Forgerock IAM suite) which allows to provide identities and access policies likewise to several clients. What are the best practices to integrate GeoServer into an existent single sign-on and identity lifecycle? Althought tools like CAS and GeoFence allow to enable such features it's more likely that GeoServer needs a leaner and cleaner path towards the externalization of authentication and authorization for the OGC services and its REST API.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
41:11 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

FOSS4G Bonn 2016: Lightning Talks I

  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

The Evolution of the GeoNode Community

The GeoNode project has grown from an idea and a handful of early partners 5 years ago to a large and thriving open source project and downstream ecosystem. This talk will discuss the cast of characters and organizations that currently contribute to GeoNode, how this community has grown and evolved over time and the growing pains encountered and lessons learned in the process. Particular focus will be paid to the technical and collaborative aspects of growing and managing a diverse community, looking at how new community members are brought into the fold and how the resources that organizations with different needs and requirements bring to the table are marshaled most effectively to achieve economies of scale when developing new features. The GeoNode community has begun a quantitative analysis of organizational return on investment from open source and initial results of this study will also be presented.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

From global observations to local information: The Earth Observation Monitor

Earth Observation (EO) data are available around the globe and can be used for a range of applications. To support scientists and local stakeholders in the usage of information from space, barriers, especially in data processing, need to be reduced. To meet this need, the software framework "Earth Observation Monitor" provides access and analysis tools for global EO vegetation time-series data based on standard-compliant geoprocessing services. Data are automatically downloaded from several data providers, processed, and time-series analysis tools for vegetation analyses extract further information. A web portal and a mobile application have been developed to show the usage of interoperable geospatial web services and to simplify the access and analysis of global EO time-series data. All steps from data download to analysis are automated and provided as operational geoprocessing services. Open-source software has been used to develop the services and client applications.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Building applications with FOSS4G bricks: two examples of the use of GRASS GIS modules as a high-level "language"' for the analyses of continuous space data in economic geography

In a world where researchers are more and more confronted to large sets of micro-data, new algorithms are constantly developed that have to be translated into usable programs. Modular GIS toolkits such as GRASS GIS offer a middle way between low-level programming approaches and GUI-based desktop GIS. The modules can be seen as elements of a programming language which makes the implementation of algorithms for spatial analysis very easy for researchers. Using two examples of algorithms in economic geography, for estimating regional exports and for determining raster-object neighborhood matrices, this paper shows how just a few module calls can replace more complicated low-level programs, as long as the researcher can change perspective from a pixel-by-pixel view to a map view of the problem at hand. Combining GRASS GIS with Python as general glue between modules also offers options for easy multi-processing, as well as supporting the increasingly loud call for open research, including open source computing tools in research.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:52 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Using SQLite to take maps offline on mobile devices

Nowadays, the internet allows us to access maps on mobile and tablet devices in real-time when we need them. Very often we might be without an internet connection. How to get access to maps in such situations? The answer is to take maps offline. What are technical challenges to get maps offline? Why is SQLite ideal database for offline map storage? How to store all vectors and rasters into a single SQLite database on a mobile device? How to render such maps using hardware with limited capabilities? What are storage and bandwidth requirements? How to solve offline map editing and synchronization? These are only some of the questions this talk will focus on.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

OSGeo conference videos as a resource for scientific research: The TIB|AV Portal

This paper reports on new opportunities for research and education in Free and Open Source Geoinformatics as a translational part of Open Science, enabled the growing collection of OSGeo conference video recordings at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB). Since 2015, OSGeo conference recordings have been included to the collection sphere of TIB in information sciences. Currently, video content from selected national (FOSSGIS), regional (FOSS4G-NA) and global (FOSS4G) conferences is being actively collected. The annual growth exceeds 100 hours of new content relating to the OSGeo software projects and the OSGeo scientific-technical communities. This is seconded by retrospective acquisition of video material dating from past conferences, going back until 2002 to preserve this content, ensuring both long term availability and access. The audiovisual OSGeo-related content is provided through the TIB|AV Portal, a web-based platform for scientific audiovisual media providing state-of-the art multimedia analysis and retrieval. It implements the requirements by research libraries for reliable long term preservation. Metadata enhancement analysis provides extended search and retrieval options. Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) enable scientific citation of full videos, excerpts and still frames, use in education and also referral in social networks. This library-operated service infrastructure turns the audiovisual OSGeo-related content in a reliable source for science and education.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Keynote I - Maximising the socio-economic potential of EO data.

  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

PROBA-V mission exploitation platform

In januari, the European Space Agency launched the first version of the PROBA-V mission exploitation platform. proba-v-mep.esa.int. This platform, which is fully operated by VITO Remote Sensing, has the goal to simplify the use of open remote sensing data which should eventually result in operational applications that benefit society. Exploitation platforms are the way of the future to handle the ever increasing volumes of remote sensing data, and at VITO we believe that the use of Open Source software is the only way to collaborate on this shared vision. In this talk, first I want to give a general overview on what users can do with the PROBA-V MEP. This involves using an Openstack VM loaded with FOSS software and direct access to the dataset, to access an Hadoop cluster where a user can distribute his processing using Spark. Secondly, I want to show how we are using Geotrellis to support interactive queries on the full timeseries of remote sensing data that is available in the platform. Also showing how this can be done from within an interactive Scala notebook in the browser.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:55 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

OGC's Land Administration Working Group – Building Bridges between communities

Land administration is an ongoing concern in many countries of the world and less than 30% of the landcover is properly titled or surveyed. This lack leads to insecurity of tenure, economic barriers, land grabbing and is a major problem to resolving land conflicts. Land administration frameworks have to support a wide variety of regulatory and policy environments and interoperability is key in providing the necessary flexibility. In order to avoid the creation of yet another set of data silos OGC members set out to form a Domain Working Group (DWG) on Land Administration as a forum to explore existing interoperability standards and best practices in this domain. The presentation will focus on this newly established working group and introduce to some of the key points of interest. While there are some standards describing elements of an administrative system (for example ISO LADM), there is no consistent use of geospatial description of land records or adequate rules for defining and describing the quality of the records. The group will work to provide a common vocabulary for the locational aspects of land administration databases and will also be a forum for connecting suitable technology for data linkage and quality assessment. Some of the key players in the Land Administration domain have created Open Source tools like FLOSS SOLA (FAO) and STDM (GLTN and UN Habitat) which are based on core OSGeo technology and already make extensive use OGC standards.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Humanitarian Capacity Building and Preparedness with QGIS

MapAction has been using QGIS for the past five years or so as its principal training tool when working with humanitarian agencies in a number of countries affected by humanitarian disaster and conflict. This talk will focus on the training and preparedness work that MapAction has carried out with QGIS, reflecting on the experience of using QGIS, describing the methods it has employed to work with both GIS professionals and staff new to GIS, and what has been learned in the process. This will include some discussion of what has been successful and less successful, and how the use of mapping and GIS in humanitarian response can be encouraged and supported in the long term. There will also be examples of QGIS products and implementation by other organisations, with a view to identifying best practice and the means of disseminating this in the humanitarian information management community.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:11 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Towards open, interoperable, and transdisciplinary point clouds for high performance computing

Large point clouds have emerged across a wide range of disciplines, however users and managers face a bewildering range of storage formats, large datasets and convoluted workflows for analysing point clouds alongside other data. Services like OpenTopography and the PDAL toolkit enable point cloud discovery and use, but integration with other earth systems data is not transparently supported. The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) hosts 10+PB of research data, predominantly in the realm of Earth Systems. These include extensive point cloud data which need to be discoverable alongside, and interoperable with, substantial collections of geospatial observations and model data using common tools in a High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) environment. NCI has created a National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP) to help manage and analyse the data, both locally and remotely using web services which makes use of advanced features in HDF/NetCDF. We have demonstrated that deploying other geospatial data using a HDF5 model has the potential to directly improve large-scale usage and increase data interoperability between diverse geospatial collections. Models such as the Sensor Independent Point Cloud (SIPC) and SPDLib are based on HDF5. NCI are currently evaluating the use of these formats to aid discovery, extraction and processing using readily available tools, as well as interrogation via web services. The end goal for NCI is making point data discoverable and accessible to end-users in ways which allow seamless interoperability with other datasets and processing techniques.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
51:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

OSGeo AGM

After 5 years in production the open source based Pavement Management System for Ireland has amassed over 15 years of road-related data. The back-end mapping engine is powered by MapServer and we are looking to improve performance when dealing with more and more data. The talk will focus on how to set up Locust, an open source Python load testing tool, to automatically get average load times for each WMS and WFS layer from MapServer, and how many users MapServer can handle concurrently. A small open source project is currently being written to help this process. Whilst MapServer is the focus of the talk, any OGC-compliant server can be tested in the same way. The talk will then briefly run through a series of experiments to see how changing various components affects performance. These are: Running MapServer on Linux as compared to Windows Using the MapServer native SQL Server driver, and using the OGR driver Map file size Venkatesh Raghavan (Osaka City University)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Identification of SAR Detected Targets on Sea in Near Real Time Applications for Maritime Surveillance

Remote sensing technologies are widely used in maritime surveillance applications. Nowadays, spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems provide outstanding capabilities for target detection on sea for large areas independently from the weather conditions. Complementary information from the Automatic Identification System (AIS) makes it possible to generate a value-added target-detection product. Resulting layers on the maritime situation – once provided to decision makers - would be highly beneficial in order to understand what is going on at sea and how it would impact on Maritime Safety and Security. This paper describes the approach of SAR-AIS data fusion and its visualization means developed for Near Real Time (NRT) Applications for Maritime Situational Awareness.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:53 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Bringing benthic data to the surface - moving Marine Recorder into an open source spatial database.

The Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) is one of a number of organisations that run inshore and offshore surveys to collect data on seabed biodiversity (e.g. species records and habitat types). The main storage and collation system for these data is Marine Recorder, a Microsoft Access-based database application developed by JNCC in 2002. Despite several updates since then, the system is now significantly out of date, and the lack of internet connectivity or the ability to store spatial data is a major problem. As a result of these issues, organisations in the UK that collect benthic data are investigating more up-to-date systems and there is a significant risk of data fragmentation. JNCC are currently in the process of moving all of our spatial data from a file based system into PostGIS. This talk will describe JNCC’s open-source geospatial information strategy and how we are integrating Marine Recorder into this, discussing the efficiency savings that this provides, as well as our plans for developing a full open-source, online replacement for Marine Recorder in the future.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

MapServer Status Report

2015 was a big year for the MapServer project with the release of the 7.0 major version. This presentation highlights the new features included in this version, like WFS 2.0 for Inspire, UTFGrids, or heatmaps, as well as a recap of the main features added in recent releases. It further shows the current and future directions of the project and discusses contribution opportunities for interested developers and users. After the status report of the MapServer project there will be the opportunity for users to interact with members of the MapServer project team in an open question/answer session. Don’t miss this chance to meet and chat face-to-face with members of the MapServer project team!
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Kickstart your web map app!

Do you want to avoid writing boilerplate code for map applications? Would you rather take a ready-made template for your apps and start hacking away the cool stuff? Oskari and RPC may be just what you're looking for! Oskari is an extensible and versatile map application platform which provides an easy user-interface for creating embeddable maps to websites. Embedded maps can be controlled from the website with an API to create innovative and user-friendly applications. The API includes features that allow you to 'visualize data' on the map and/or 'react to user interaction' with the map, allow users to give feedback by 'drawing on the map' or create a custom trip planner with routing features. The API can be easily extended by adding features to Oskari platform. Oskari has been originally developed by the National Land Survey of Finland, but now being developed and used by multiple organizations, also internationally. There are numerous websites already making use of embedded maps, including Finnish national e-services.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Unleashing the potential of your sensor data with istSOS

istSOS is a complete and easy to use sensor data management system for acquiring, storing and dispatching time-series observations. istSOS is compliant with the Sensor Observation Service standard (SOS) version 1.0 and 2.0 from the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and offers unique extended capabilities to support scientific data analyses (integrated quality assurance, RESTful API, on the fly processing with virtual procedures, remote data aggregation, time-space re-projection etc.). istSOS core libraries are written in Python while it easy to use interface is Web based. This presentation will illustrates the projects and its latest enhancements, including: The OGC SOS 2.0 standard implementation Authentication and Authorization System Alert and Notification system Finally the presentation will discuss the challenges that istSOS need to face for entering in Big Data showing results of scalability tests and ongoing new IoT driven development features. The robustness of the implemented solution has been validated in a real-case application: the Verbano Lake Early Warning System. In this application, near real-time data have to be exchanged by inter-regional partners and used in a hydrological model for lake level forecasting and flooding hazard assessment. This system is linked with a dedicated geoportal used by the civil protection for the management, alert and protection of the population and the assets of the Locarno area.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

A complete toolchain for object-based image analysis with GRASS GIS

Object-based image analysis (OBIA) is the current state of the art feature extraction technique for very high resolution (VHR) satellite imagery. While one proprietary tool dominated the market for years, more and more alternative solutions now appear, including free software based, and research continues to produce new approaches. However, many of the techniques implemented in free software are not easily accessible to the inexperienced user. This presentation presents efforts to develop a complete tool chain of easy-to-use modules for OBIA in GRASS GIS, ever since the development of an image segmentation module i.segment during GSoC 2012. Amongst the other modules presented are i.segment.uspo for unsupervised segmentation parameter optimization, i.segment.hierarchical for hierarchical segmentation, v.stats and i.segment.stats for the collection of statistics characterizing the objects, v.class.ml and v.class.mlR for supervised image classification. Combining these modules enables semi-automatic treatment of VHR imagery in a completely free software environment, as shown through examples of the two research projects SmartPop (funded by ISSeP) and MAUPP (funded by BELSPO). The talk will end with some reflections about possible further enhancements of this process, including through the combination of GRASS GIS with other FOSS4G tools.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:35 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

MapServer MapCache: Project Status Report

This talk will present the recent developments that happened in MapCache, the tiling server from the MapServer project. Main features include enhanced support for dimensions allowing easy creation of imagery mosaics, and further integration with cloud based infrastructure.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

geOrchestra SDI - Project Status Report

geOrchestra is the free, modular and secure Spatial Data Infrastructure software born in 2009 to meet the requirements of the INSPIRE directive in Europe. It is built on top of the latest stable versions of GeoServer and GeoNetwork. In this talk we will briefly present the geOrchestra SDI, before going through the major contributions during the previous year, to answer the following questions: * how the project moved from tainted to generic artifacts (war files, debian packages, docker images) * how to deploy a geOrchestra SDI instance in 10 minutes * how to build your robust, high performance and high availability SDI in the clouds
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

GeoExt3 — Universal WebGIS applications with OpenLayers 3 und ExtJS 6

  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Mapchete - parallelized batch geoprocessing using Python

Processing geodata can be fairly simple until the input data reaches a certain size. Creating a hillshade or extracting contour lines from a DEM can be done quickly, but if you want to do this with e.g. the global SRTM dataset (1296001 x 417601 pixel), the process will crash (unless you are visiting from the future). Besides, if there are additional steps required like clipping the data to the 400MB landpolygon behemoths from OSM or applying custom filters, you probably find yourself starting to write your own tool chunking the data. mapchete tries to solve this issue by helping you to focus on developing your geoprocess written in Python and applying this process to the data. It does so by automatically reprojecting and chunking the input datasets into tiles (based on the “WMTS simple profile”) and running your Python process for each tile individually and in parallel on all available CPU cores. mapchete offers two command line tools. mapchete execute runs the process on the full dataset, similar to tile pyramid seeding for map caches. mapchete serve hosts an OpenLayers interface and processes only the data in areas and zoom levels you are currently inspecting. This allows you to test and assess your process on the full dataset on the server, instead of clipping and downloading subsets on your laptop. mapchete is used as the data preprocessing backbone of EOX Maps, a service which provides background maps for example to the European Space Agency.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Train the users! No GIS is easy...

Every software platform needs three things in order to be successful: Good and solid software, reliable support and maintenance services in order to make it run smoothly, and training possibilities for the endusers to make sure they use it in a most effective way. Open geospatial software is the basis. And, with the progress that has been made in the last few years, it is among the best around. Support and other services are more and more common. In the Netherlands, you can identify several commercial organizations specializing in FOSS4G, and others adding it to their existing portfolio of services. But what about training possibilities? Few specialized training services for geospatial software are existing, and service providers might do some on-the-job training, but it is by no means comparable to the well oiled training machine that distributers of closed source software usually run. So, how to set up training courses for open source geo? At the Dutch Geo Academie we have some experience with this kind of training, and we’d like to share some ideas.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Dealing with change - OSRM Version 5

The Open Source Routing Machine (OSRM) is a routing engine, providing blazing fast route-finding on global data sets like OpenStreetMap. With Version 5 of OSRM we tackled two challenges: providing a world-class navigation experience for car drivers and making OSRM easier to work with for developers. To deliver great navigation, we made route duration estimates more realistic, by allowing developers to provide custom speed and turn duration data. We also dramatically shortened pre-processing times and improved turn-by-turn guidance. To deliver a great experience to developers we modernized the code base and improved the build and test systems. We also refactored the HTTP API to support the new features and removed historical short-comings. In this talk we will introduce the subject of routing in general and then explain the new features of OSRM Version 5 in detail. We will highlight the trade-offs we faced and the reasoning behind our decisions.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:39 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

QGis as a platform: transforming the desktop QGis for tablet use in Flanders fields

In this talk we'll take the off-the-shelf QGis you've come to know and love on your desktop and search the limits of customization. We'll transform the standard desktop application to a version tailored for tablet use including a finger-friendly interface, camera integration and full offline editing support with data synchronisation. Taking QGis where no QGis has gone before, we take the theory into Flanders fields. We demonstrate the possibilities of the technology with a use case where QGis is used in the field to assess soil erosion in the hills of Flanders. Thanks to a strong foundation and simple yet powerful customization options, we learn that Qgis can really outperform your expectations, even outside of its (or your?) comfort zone. Bring your boots!
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
out of 4 pages
Loading...
Feedback

Timings

  188 ms - page object
  114 ms - search
   13 ms - highlighting
    0 ms - highlighting/20456
    0 ms - highlighting/20457
    0 ms - highlighting/20391
    0 ms - highlighting/20436
    0 ms - highlighting/20414
    1 ms - highlighting/20401
    0 ms - highlighting/20400
    0 ms - highlighting/20389
    0 ms - highlighting/20428
    0 ms - highlighting/20440
    1 ms - highlighting/20396
    1 ms - highlighting/20443
    1 ms - highlighting/20463
    1 ms - highlighting/20445
    1 ms - highlighting/20398
    1 ms - highlighting/20423
    1 ms - highlighting/20425
    1 ms - highlighting/20434
    0 ms - highlighting/20325
    0 ms - highlighting/20407
    1 ms - highlighting/20404
    1 ms - highlighting/20449
    1 ms - highlighting/20458
    1 ms - highlighting/20453
    1 ms - highlighting/20452
    1 ms - highlighting/20403
    1 ms - highlighting/20331
    1 ms - highlighting/20326
    1 ms - highlighting/20328
    1 ms - highlighting/20327
    1 ms - highlighting/20433
    0 ms - highlighting/20435
    1 ms - highlighting/20412
    1 ms - highlighting/20393
    1 ms - highlighting/20409
    1 ms - highlighting/20411

Version

AV-Portal 3.8.0 (dec2fe8b0ce2e718d55d6f23ab68f0b2424a1f3f)