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26:01 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

QWCII: A new QGIS Web Client

QGIS Web Client (QWC) is a Web-GIS client based on OpenLayers 2 and ExtJS and tailored to use special extensions of QGIS Server, such as extracting information from QGIS Project settings, extended GetFeatureInfo Requests, GetPrint and DXF export. It uses standard WMS/WFS commands, but extends them where needed. QWC is used by several cities and provinces in Europe. There are four main reasons why QWC needs to be overhauled: The code structure is not very modular and should be better structured. QWC only works well on Desktops. Despite a separate mobile web client based on OpenLayers 3 and jQuery Mobile, for maintenance reasons it would be much better to have a single web client that uses responsive design and works for all devices from a single viewer. The base libraries ExtJS 3.4 and Openlayers 2 have been phased out and there are newer versions available. However, the upgrade to the newer versions is not trivial. Having a more modern foundation based on newer web technologies This presentation discusses the requirements, the progress of this project, technical decisions taken and challenges solved during the project. While the first goal of the project is to establish a modern foundation for the coming years and reach feature parity with the old QWC project, it is already planned to implement a QWCII python plugin that offers a GUI and assists with the global configuration of the client. This tool should also facilitate the management of topics and projects.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Paleomaps: SDI for paleoenvironment GIS data

Paleoenvironmental studies and according information (data) are abundantly pub-lished and available in the scientific record. However, GIS-based paleoenviron-mental information and datasets are comparably rare. Here, we present an OpenScience approach for collecting and creating GIS-based data and maps of paleoenvironments, and publishing them in a web based Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI),for access by the archaeology and paleoenvironment communities. The Open Science approach to the publication of data, allows to properly cite the publisheddatasets as bibliographic sources in research that builds upon these data sets.This paper has its focus on the implementation and setup of the Free and OpenSource Software for Geospatial (FOSS4G) based SDI, and on the workflow forcompiling and publishing the GIS data.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Analysing the practical feasibility of FOSSGIS in military operations – A Cholera outbreak use case

Remaining ahead of the enemy in all circumstances is crucial to any military power. Geographic information systems (GIS) can provide the military commander with geospatial information about the theatre of war to assist with the planning and execution of a mission. Unfortunately, technology usually comes at a price. GIS is no exception. The cost of acquiring and maintaining GIS software licenses, as well as training staff in the use of the software, needs to be considered. The question arises whether open source software, which can be used without any software license expenses, is a feasible alternative in military operations. The problem is that the perception exists that open source GIS software is neither user-friendly nor mature enough to be used in military operations. This study evaluates the functionality of an open source desktop GIS product in a military operations use case. A list of specific GIS functionalities was compiled based on the literature study and by developing a use case. The functionalities were executed in QGIS. Results were compared against results of the same functionalities in ArcGIS, which is widely used in military operations. Results show that all GIS functions tested by this study could be performed by both software products. These results are interesting because it means that FOSSGIS can be successfully deployed by units or directorates that has limited funds available to expand the existing GIS capabilities for military operations.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:11 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Towards open, interoperable, and transdisciplinary point clouds for high performance computing

Large point clouds have emerged across a wide range of disciplines, however users and managers face a bewildering range of storage formats, large datasets and convoluted workflows for analysing point clouds alongside other data. Services like OpenTopography and the PDAL toolkit enable point cloud discovery and use, but integration with other earth systems data is not transparently supported. The Australian National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) hosts 10+PB of research data, predominantly in the realm of Earth Systems. These include extensive point cloud data which need to be discoverable alongside, and interoperable with, substantial collections of geospatial observations and model data using common tools in a High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Performance Data (HPD) environment. NCI has created a National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP) to help manage and analyse the data, both locally and remotely using web services which makes use of advanced features in HDF/NetCDF. We have demonstrated that deploying other geospatial data using a HDF5 model has the potential to directly improve large-scale usage and increase data interoperability between diverse geospatial collections. Models such as the Sensor Independent Point Cloud (SIPC) and SPDLib are based on HDF5. NCI are currently evaluating the use of these formats to aid discovery, extraction and processing using readily available tools, as well as interrogation via web services. The end goal for NCI is making point data discoverable and accessible to end-users in ways which allow seamless interoperability with other datasets and processing techniques.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Collect & Manage Geospatial Data Edits with GeoSHAPE

Syrus Mesdaghi (Prominent Edge LLC)
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Kickstart your web map app!

Do you want to avoid writing boilerplate code for map applications? Would you rather take a ready-made template for your apps and start hacking away the cool stuff? Oskari and RPC may be just what you're looking for! Oskari is an extensible and versatile map application platform which provides an easy user-interface for creating embeddable maps to websites. Embedded maps can be controlled from the website with an API to create innovative and user-friendly applications. The API includes features that allow you to 'visualize data' on the map and/or 'react to user interaction' with the map, allow users to give feedback by 'drawing on the map' or create a custom trip planner with routing features. The API can be easily extended by adding features to Oskari platform. Oskari has been originally developed by the National Land Survey of Finland, but now being developed and used by multiple organizations, also internationally. There are numerous websites already making use of embedded maps, including Finnish national e-services.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Mapchete - parallelized batch geoprocessing using Python

Processing geodata can be fairly simple until the input data reaches a certain size. Creating a hillshade or extracting contour lines from a DEM can be done quickly, but if you want to do this with e.g. the global SRTM dataset (1296001 x 417601 pixel), the process will crash (unless you are visiting from the future). Besides, if there are additional steps required like clipping the data to the 400MB landpolygon behemoths from OSM or applying custom filters, you probably find yourself starting to write your own tool chunking the data. mapchete tries to solve this issue by helping you to focus on developing your geoprocess written in Python and applying this process to the data. It does so by automatically reprojecting and chunking the input datasets into tiles (based on the “WMTS simple profile”) and running your Python process for each tile individually and in parallel on all available CPU cores. mapchete offers two command line tools. mapchete execute runs the process on the full dataset, similar to tile pyramid seeding for map caches. mapchete serve hosts an OpenLayers interface and processes only the data in areas and zoom levels you are currently inspecting. This allows you to test and assess your process on the full dataset on the server, instead of clipping and downloading subsets on your laptop. mapchete is used as the data preprocessing backbone of EOX Maps, a service which provides background maps for example to the European Space Agency.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

How to make a 3D web geoportal

Did you ever fly around a country in 3D? In your standard web browser? Without plugins? 3D for the web is an emerging technology. WebGL enables web browsers to exploit the GPU of a computer to create beautiful and fast 3D worlds. It is time for web geoportals to go 3D. swisstopo was able to create a 3D viewer for the geoportal of the swiss confederation map.geo.admin.ch. We'll show you how it was done - and how Open Source enabled it.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Magnacarto – Create map designs for MapServer and Mapnik

Magnacarto is a new open-ource tool that makes it easier to create map styles for MapServer and Mapnik. It uses CartoCSS - a styling language similar to CSS - to create both Mapfiles for Mapserver and XML-files for Mapnik. CartoCSS provides powerful functions: You can create base-styles and extend them for specific map scales or attributes. This avoids unnecessary repetition for similar map objects. CartoCSS styles are typically just 1/5th to 1/10th of the length of comparable mapfiles. With variables, expressions and color functions (darken, lighten, mix, etc) it's possible to create new design variations by changing only a few lines of the style. Magnacarto comes with a modern web interface that shows the final map design with MapServer and Mapnik. Live-refresh and multiple map windows makes it easy to directly verify any changes made to the map style. Additionally, there is a command line tools to automate the conversion of CartoCSS to Mapfiles and XML. The presentation briefly talks about the history of CartoCSS and Magnacarto. It shows important functions, how they are used in practice and it discusses the power and limitations of CartoCSS. It will also show new and upcoming features and possible extensions (SLD).
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:47 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

OpenSource tools for water network management

This presentation details some OpenSource tools dedicated to water network management, be it for water distribution or wastewater networks. The qWAT project is a specific tool based on QGIS and PostGIS. it aims at managing water distribution networks. The data model is part of the project and covers most use cases for this kind of assets. The qWAT project is strongly linked to QGIS, and tries to contribute to the core of QGIS so as to mutualize developments and features among other QGIS-based applications. Similarly, the QGEP project is dedicated to wastewater networks. We also present a use case for an implementation of a wastewater information system in France, based on QGIS and PostGIS. Furthermore, we show how PostGIS-based projects allow to do network and graph analysis, so as to extract meaningful information for decision-taking and planning. QGIS-Epanet and QGIS-SWMM are two QGIS Processing extensions integrating simulation features on water distribution and wastewater networks. They let the user run simulations to analyze the network, dimensioning, and identify specific issues. These set of tools show that OpenSource GIS now tend to fulfill use cases for specific fields of application, and water management is among them.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Global Forest Watch: Using Open Data to Save the World’s Forests

Global Forest Watch (GFW) is an interactive online forest monitoring platform designed to empower people everywhere with the information they need to better manage and conserve forest landscapes. Thanks to open data, GFW is able to do the following: Monitor when and where forests are changing. NASA’s freely available Landsat and MODIS data has allowed hundreds of scientists and researchers to develop innovative solutions to monitor landscape changes. Algorithms are now used to process and analyze this remotely-sensed data to show when and where forests are changing with surprising precision and speed. Understand why forests are changing. Open data showing boundaries of land allocated for specific purposes, such as commodity production and conservation, as well as land management, allows us to understand why forests are changing. Are trees being cleared for palm oil? Are certain swaths of forests still standing because they are managed by indigenous groups? Gauge the significance of deforestation. Additional open data provided by research institutions, governments, and others is used to understand the implications of deforestation on biodiversity, climate change, and provision of ecosystem services. For example, was a recently clear-cut area of forest home to endangered species? Was it a carbon rich primary forest? Spark further innovation. GFW’s open-source code and APIs allow others to leverage GFW’s analysis tools and open data to create additional forest monitoring and management tools.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:24 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Open Source strategies in a federal office - migrating from closed software to OS development

On of the task areas of the German Federal Office for radiation protection (BfS) in an case of a radiological emergency is to collect available and capture own relevant data, process and evaluate these and create documents including the necessary information to enable the crisis unit to make the right decisions for emergency preparedness and response. Some time ago, the BfS started to migrate from a proprietary monolithic system to an approach combining several OSGeo projects into a whole emergency system, including PostGIS, GeoExt, OpenLayers3, Geoserver, GeoNetwork and MapfishPrint and other software even from non-Geo but Open Source projects. To fill missing links between software components and to meet all demands of radiological disaster management, the BfS does not only use Open Source GIS software, but started several own software projects using free licenses as well. To seriously follow the Open Source strategy the BfS started to publish some of its projects using GitHub as a commonly used platform for Open Source projects, but not a common way for a federal office. The talk presents GitHub-driven Open Source projects of the BfS embedded in an OS driven software stack using several well known OSGeo projects.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Using Mapillary data for editing maps

This talk is going to give an overview of the different data endpoints of Mapillary, for example images, object detections (e.g. street signs), objects and vector tiles. We will look at different integrations like OpenStreetMap iD editor, JOSM, Wiki Loves Monuments and others using portions of this data to improve or document physical spaces. Also, the talk will cover different Open Source integration libs like OpenSfM, MapillaryJS and the iD editor.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Command Line Geography

The keyboard is the new compass ! In this entertaining session, we will see how our beloved shell can fit into the workflow of the modern cartographer in the most surprising ways, and we will generate maps in the least expected places (your terminal, your desktop, your IDE...) analyse and visualise geo data with expressive SQL one-liners ; manipulate file formats with shell I/O and useful libraries ; geocode with the blink of an eye (or with your voice) ; make ASCII and emoji maps ; transform Atom into a supercharged geo IDE ; set up the perfect web mapping project environment in seconds ; and many more ! The CartoDB SQL APIs, along with the CartoDB Node client, SQL and PostGIS, plus a host of other open source libraries (GDAL, CSVKit, Yeoman...), will be showcased as the "survival kit" for the hurried but demanding mapper.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:14 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2016

Leaflet.annotate - Semantic markup for geographic web maps in HTML

I investigated the public Schema.org vocabulary, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, the HTML living standard and SVG 1.1 to make it easy for map makers and publishers to advance the markup they publish. With an understanding of geographic web maps as documents of composite structure i want to share and discuss a LeafletJS implementation representing this investigation. Building on the descriptive markup and this model of a geographic web map i also want to share the idea of developing a user dialog which could support readers of maps in analyzing WHO contributed WHERE, WHEN - and WHAT is the map about. The Leaflet.annotate API can be seen as an interface proposal for other authoring tools or geographic content management systems and with that I hope to contribute to a discussion around accessible and responsible publishing of geographic maps on the WWW.
  • Published: 2016
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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AV-Portal 3.8.0 (dec2fe8b0ce2e718d55d6f23ab68f0b2424a1f3f)