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25:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

istSOS: latest developments and first steps into the OSGeo incubation process

istSOS (http://istsos.org) is an OGC SOS server implementation entirely written in Python. istSOS allows for managing and dispatching observations from monitoring sensors according to the Sensor Observation Service standard. istSOS is released under the GPL License, and should run on all major platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac OS X). The presentation will go through the details of all the new features that will be packed in the next release. In particular the presenters will introduce enhancements that include the Advanced Procedures Status Page and the istSOS Alerts & Web Notification Service. The istSOS Advanced Procedures Status Page is a new section of the Web graphical user Interface, offering at a glance a graphically representation of the Sensor Network health. Administrators can easily figure out common issues related with sensor data acquisition and transmission errors. The istSOS Alert & Web Notification Service are the result of the Google Summer of Code 2014 outputs. This service is a REST implementation that take inspiration from the OGC Web Notification Service (OGC, 2003; OGC, 2006a) and the Sensor Alert Service (OGC, 2006b) which currently are OpenGIS Best Practices. Alerts are triggered by customized conditions on sensor observations and can be dispatched through emails or social networks. This year istSOS is entering into the OSGeo incubation process, this new challenge will permit to enhance the software quality and consolidate the project management procedures. The presenters will present the incubation status and discuss about the next steps.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Image Geocoding as a Service

Driven by the ambition of a global geocoding solution, in this paper we present the architecture of an image geocoding service. It takes advantage of the ubiquity of cameras, that are present in almost all smartphones. It is an inexpensive sensor yet powerful, that can be used to provide precise location and orientation. This geocoding service provides an API similar to existing ones for place names and addresses, like Google Geocoding API. Instead of a text based query, images can be submitted to estimate the location and orientation of the user. Developers can use this new API, keeping almost all the existing code already used for other geocoding APIs. Behind the scenes, image features are extracted from the submitted photograph, and compared against a huge database of georeferenced models. These models were constructed using structure from motion (SFM) techniques, and heavily reduced to a representative set of all information using Synthetic Views. Our preliminary results shows that the pose estimation of the majority of the images submitted to our geocoding was successfully computed (more than 60%) with the mean positional error around 2 meters. With this service, an inexpensive outdoor/indoor location service can be provided, for example, for urban environments, where GPS fails.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Magical PostGIS in three brief movements

Everyone knows you can query a bounding box or even spatially join tables in PostGIS, but what about more advanced magic? This short symphony of PostGIS examples will look at using advanced features of PostGIS and PostgreSQL to accomplish surprising results: * Using full text search to build a spatially interactive web form. * Using raster functionality to look into the future. * Using standard PostgreSQL features to track and visualize versioning in data. PostGIS is a powerful tool on it's own, but combined with the features of PostgreSQL, it is almost magical.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Building and integrating a Continuous-Integration system within your open source project

So you have an open source project or you want to create a new one. Maybe you have worked on a development project in the past that didn’t have quite the amount of rigor you would have liked. You know you want a build system for your project that is easy to administer, cheap, and powerful, but where do you start? Here is how we implemented our own process using free open source tools. We learned from experience that developers are more focused on solving problems than perceived “housekeeping” tasks. We needed tools that would automate the mundane, repeatable, mechanical, or human-difficult tasks so that developers could focus on what they are good at. We needed a single-sign on through Github to lower any barriers to tool usage that might exist. We needed a dead-simple way to determine if our commits broke functionality anywhere else in code. We needed to track how much of our code was covered by unit tests. Finally, we needed to be able to quickly and easily review each-other’s code and provide feedback. We decided on TravisCI to handle build duties in Maven with a nested project structure and also for its integration with Coveralls. For bug tracking, release scheduling, and task management, we chose WaffleIO for its tight integration with Github issues. One additional feature we desired was static analysis so that simple errors that lie outside of a linter could be caught and reported. This was handled by a combination of Coverity scans and a static analysis tool for Eclipse called Findbugs. Due to our platform support and third-party library (GDAL) requirement, the Github Wiki was the perfect place to keep all setup documents and other helpful articles for end-users and project new-comers. This system for software development worked quite well in most cases. Builds were automated, moderately tested (~40-60% coverage), and complaining to the team loudly via email when things broke. We had a new problem though: build breakages in the master branch and the inability to share code that was not yet fully functional. To alleviate this, we started using the branching and merging functionality that makes Git so valuable. Now, no direct commits occur to the master branch unless in very special circumstances. A developer will see the TravisCI build results before the merge ever occurs, allowing them to adjust code or test cases *before* they cause failures. As a side effect, the merge request workflow allows the team to perform code reviews quickly and easily. Finally, any CI system is not without challenges. Building a continuous integration system has upfront costs that should not be ignored. The payoff from those costs, however, is code/product quality and the avoidance of technical debt. Lastly, some of these CI tools lack support for private repositories.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Towards GeoExt 3 – Supporting both OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 6

GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/) is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy, rich data-package and architectural concepts of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha. Version 2.1 of GeoExt (currently in alpha-status) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and brought support for ExtJS 5 and is built atop the following installments of its base libraries: OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 5.1.0 (or ExtJS 4.2.1 at your choice). The next version of GeoExt (v3.0.0?) will support OpenLayers 3 and the new and shiny ExtJS 6 (not finally released at the time of this writing). The talk will focus on the following aspects: * Introduction into GeoExt * New features in OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 6 and how they can be used in GeoExt * The road towards GeoExt 3 * Results of the planned Code Sprint in June (see https://github.com/geoext/geoext3/wiki/GeoExt-3-Codesprint) * Remaining tasks and outlook The new features of OpenLayers (e.g. WebGL-support, rotated views, smaller build sizes, etc.) and Ext JS 6 (Unified code base for mobile and desktop while providing all functionality of ExtJS 5) and the description of the current state of this next major release will be highlighted in the talk. Online version of the presentation: http://marcjansen.github.io/foss4g-2015/Towards-GeoExt-3-Supporting-both-OpenLayers-3-and-ExtJS-6.html#/
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OSGeo and LocationTech Comparison

We have two great organizations supporting our Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial: The Open Source Geospatial Foundation and LocationTech. Putting on events like FOSS4G is primary responsibility of these software foundations - supporting our great open source software is! This talk will introduce OSGeo and LocationTech, and balance the tricky topic of comparison for those interested in what each organisation offers. We will also look at areas where these organizations are collaboration and explore possibilities for future work. Each of these software foundations support for their existing projects, ranging from "release parties" such as OSGeo Live or the Eclipse Annual Release. We are also interested in the ��incubation�� process each provides to onboard new projects. Review of the incubation provides an insight into an organization's priorities. This talks draws the incubation experience of: * GeoServer (OSGeo), GeoTools (OSGeo), * GeoGig (LocationTech), uDig (LocationTech) If you are an open source developer interested in joining a foundation we will cover some of the resource, marking and infrastructure benefits that may be a factor for consideration. We will also looking into some of the long term benefits a software foundation provides both you and importantly users of your software. If you are a team members faced with the difficult choice of selecting open source technologies this talk can help. We can learn a lot about the risks associated with open source based on how each foundation seeks to protect you. The factors a software foundation considers for its projects provide useful criteria you can use to evaluate any projects.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoServer for Spatio-temporal Data Handling With Examples For MetOc And Remote Sensing

This presentation will provide detailed information on how to ingest and configure SpatioTemporal in GeoServer to be served using OGC services, with examples from WMS and WCS services. Topics covered are as follows: * Discussion over existing data formats and how to preprocess them for best serving with GeoServer * Configuring SpatioTemporal raster and vector data in GeoServer * Serving SpatioTemporal raster and vector data with OGC Services Tips and techniques to optimize performance and allow maximum exploitation of the available data The attendees will be provided with the basic knowledge needed to preprocess and ingest the most common spatiotemporal data from the MetOc and Remote Sensing field for serving via GeoServer.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions. Advancements and improvements for the management of multidimensional raster data (NetCDF, GRIB, HDF) and mosaic thereof will be introduced, as well as the available ways to manage sliding windows of data via the REST API and importer. Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields, including support for WCS EO and WMS EO, and some considerations on the WCS MetOc extensions. The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on jai-ext, imageio-ext, and JAITools. jai-ext provides extended JAI operators that correctly handle NODATA and regione of interests (masks), JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support, while ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries. The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
14:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

triple-A for the environment: make IT simply better

triple-A for the environment: make IT simply better With the new Dutch Environment Act, the legal framework for development and maintenance of the physical environment becomes more understandable and manageable for citizens, businesses and governments. A simpler and more coherent environmental law contributes to work actively and efficiently on a dynamic and sustainable environment. This entire exercise of harmonization, reduction and integration is headed by the motto “Simply better”. In addition to the merging several dozen laws and regulations in one Environment Act (http://www.omgevingswet.nl), also the central IT office where citizens can apply for a environmental permit is further improved. This should make it easier to obtain a permit for example for a construction or business activity. The information presented in this central IT office must fulfill the triple-A requirements, i.e. Accessible, Applicable and Abiding. On the basis of this is a national system of open (geo)data registers of which the data acquisition and management is mandated to (semi-)government organizations. On each area of environmental law, a domain expert is appointed; stakeholders of each domain are metaphorically organized in an ”information house”, and all houses are situated metaphorically along “the avenue of the environment”. Goal of the improved central IT office is to provide a clear understanding of the relevant legislation and to allow each actor in the process to work with the same data and definitions. Therefore, we developed a prototype which presents a concept of linking data, definitions and regulations stored in one central register using an online mapping service as user interface. Using Linked Data as strategy with persistent URIs, we are able to link the concepts in this register to an end-user prototype application. We implemented an prototype for the question: “Do I need an environmental permit for… applying a change in business activity?“. An air quality impact assessment is computed based on user input an visualized in a map interface showing the effects of an increase of nitrogen emission on the nearby nature reserves after extending a greenhouse farming. We used the AERIUS calculation tool (http://www.aerius.nl/) of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment and presented the returned geodata as GeoJSON in the Leaflet Map API (http://www.leaflet.org). With this prototype, we provide a concept which facilitates the clear understanding of the requirements for an environmental permit by making IT simply better.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

CartoDB Basemaps: a tale of data, tiles, and dark matter sandwiches

CartoDB is an open souce tool and SaaS platform that allows users to make beautiful maps quickly and easily from their own data. To complement our users needs, we launched last year our free-to-use open source OSM based basemaps Positron and Dark Matter (https://github.com/CartoDB/CartoDB-basemaps), designed in collaboration with Stamen to complement data visualization. While architecturing them, we had several compromises in mind: they had to be powered by our existing infrastructure (powered by Mapnik and PostGIS at its core), they had to be scalable, cacheable but frequently updated, customizable, match with data overlays, and, last but not least, they had to be beautiful. This talk is the tale of the development process and tools we used, how we implemented and deployed them and the technology challenges that arose during the process of adapting a dynamic mapping infrastructure as CartoDB to the data scale of OSM, including styling, caching, and scalability, and how (we think) we achieved most of those. I will also talk about the future improvements that we are exploring about mixing the combination of basemap rendering with data from other sources, and how you can replicate and tweak those maps on your own infrastructure.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Geodata for Everyone - Model-driven development and an example of INSPIRE WFS service

In denmark the public authorities register various core information about individuals, businesses, real properties, buildings, addresses, ect.. This information is re-used throughout the public sector. It is a challenge for public authorities to re-use data from different providers to perform their tasks properly and efficiently across units, administrations and sectors. Therefore all the authoritative basic data should be defined and standardized according to the same methods. Danish Geodata agency as Denmark's central public source of geographic data has established a set of guidelines for future modelling of spatial data for distributing them as open geographic data. Based on the guidelines a model-driven process has also been established. It starts from the data modelling in UML to the end where data are distributed through WFS services and download services. One INSPIRE WFS service will be used as a concrete example.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Use case of a dual open strategy in the canton of Zurich/Switzerland

With a dual 'open'-strategy the department of geoinformation at the canton of Zurich/Switzerland opts for a strategic orientation towards open source and open data: Open in the sense of an open web-mapping- infrastructure based on open source components: Mapfish Appserver was developed as a framework for building web map applications using OGC standards and the Mapfish REST protocol. It is freely available under the new BSD-license (http://mapfish-appserver.github.io/). The Ruby on Rails gem comes with the following out-of-the box features: - Organize maps by topics, categories, organisational units, keywords and more - Combine maps with background and overlay topics with adjustable opacity - Import UMN Mapserver mapfiles to publish new topics within seconds - Fully customizable legends and feature infos - Creation of complex custom searches - Rich digitizing and editing functionality - Role-based access control on topic, layer and attribute level - Access control for WMS and WFS - Rich library of ExtJS 4 based map components - Multiple customizable viewers from minimal mobile viewer to full featured portal - Multi-site support - Built-in administration backend - Self-organized user groups maps.zh.ch, the official geodata-viewer of the canton of Zurich, was developed using Mapfish Appserver. It contains more than 100 thematic maps and is considered an indispensable working tool for everyone working with spatial data in the canton of Z?rich/Switzerland. 'Open' in the sense of Open Government Data: Zurich is the first canton participating in the national open data portal opendata.admin.ch. The portal has the function of a central, national directory of open data from different backgrounds and themes. This makes it easier to find and use appropriate data for further projects. The department of geoinformatics aims to open as many geo-datasets as possible for the public by publishing them on the national OGD-portal. The open geodata is issued in form of web services ? Web Map Services (WMS), WebFeature Services (WFS) and Web Coverage Services (WCS) - and contains a wide range of geodata from the fields of nature conservation, forestry, engineering, infrastructure planning, statistics to high resolution LIDAR-data.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Sensor up your connected applications with OGC SensorThings API

This introduction will give an introduction and live demonstration of the OGC SensorThings API. The OGC SensorThings API provides an open and unified way to interconnect the Internet of Things (IoT) devices, data, and applications over the Web. The OGC SensorThings API is a new OGC standard candidate. Unlike many existing OGC standards, SensorThings API is very simple and efficient. At the same time, it is also comprehensive and designed to handle complex use cases. It builds on a rich set of proven-working and widely-adopted open standards, such as the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, including the ISO/OGC Observation and Measurement (O&M) and Sensor Observation Services (SOS). The main difference between the SensorThings API and the OGC SOS is that the SensorThings API is designed specifically for the resource-constrained IoT devices and the Web developer community. As a result, the SensorThings API follows the REST principles, the use of an efficient JSON encoding, and the use of the flexible OASIS OData protocol and URL conventions. In addition to introduce the specification, this talk will also demonstrate an end-to-end IoT application based on the SensorUp IoT platform, an open source implementation of the SensorThings API, including a server, javascript library, web dashboard and a Arduino library.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Opening Address Data around the World

With over 110 million points, OpenAddresses.io has grown to be the largest open database of address data in the world. Governments, developers and businesses are realizing that address data belongs in a commons where it can be easily maintained, used by all, and drive economic growth. These early efforts are now powering some of the world's best commercial geocoding systems, as well as crucial infrastructure like emergency responders. But there's more work to do. We need to reform outdated laws, expand coverage to new cultural contexts, untangle shortsighted licenses, and invent new modes of collaboration between the public and government. We'll cover how OpenAddresses started, how it can be used today, and how we expect it to grow into a definitive global resource.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Map publishing with or without programming skills

This presentation will showcase the use of Oskari (http://oskari.org/oskari) in publishing embedded map applications. The typical use case doesn't require any programming skills. You only need to select the map layers and tools that will be available in the application. After that, you can customize the user interface (size, colors, tool layout etc.). As a result the publishing tool will give you a HTML-snippet to embed to any web site. The supported web services are WMS, WMTS, WFS and Esri REST. If your data is not readily available through a web service, you can import data. Shapefiles, KML, GPX and MID/MIF-files are supported. There's an extensive selection of tools at your disposal: index map, centering to user��s location, address and place name search, attribute table (for vector data) to name a few. Integrating the map application with the surrounding web page makes more advanced use cases possible. All you need is a few lines of JavaScript to use the RPC interface (http://www.oskari.org/documentation/bundles/framework/rpc). With RPCs you can control the map application from the parent document and vice-versa. They can also exchange information. This enables you to develop highly interactive web applications with always up-to-date data. In the presentation an example application made using Oskari and D3 will be showcased.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Research client side draggable route selection with pgRouting

pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide shortest path search and other network analysis functionality such as alternative K-Shortest path selection. But, in some case, client side draggable route selection (like Google Maps Direction or OSRM) is preferable. This presentation will research what is necessary to realize such client side draggle route selection with pgRouting, then try to implement the functionality to some browser(Leaflet, OpenLayers .etc) and desktop(QGIS .etc) client.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

A framework for assessing location-based personalized exposure risk of infectious disease transmission

Human mobility is an important risk factor affecting disease transmission. Therefore, understanding detailed spatial behaviors and interactions among individuals is a fundamental issue. Past studies using high-resolution human contacts data from smart phones with GPS logs have captured spatial-temporal heterogeneity and daily contact patterns among individuals. However, measuring personalized exposed risk of infectious disease transmission is still under development. The purpose of the study is to establish a location-based framework for assessing personalized exposed risk of infectious disease transmission. The framework consists of three components: the first is client-side smart phone-based risk assessment module. We developed Android application for collecting real-time location data and displaying the personalized exposed risk score. The second component is the server-side epidemic simulation model. The simulation model calculated the personalized exposed risk score based on real-time GPS logs and individual mobility data from the client-side Android application. The last component is the disease alarm device for triggering the service-side epidemic simulation model. We installed infrared sensors in people-gathering areas as the alarm device to monitor human body temperature for detecting fever syndrome. We used NTU main campus as a pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of the framework. We analyzed the records of students’ taking course and modeled the spatial interaction relationships among classroom buildings due to students’ mobility around the campus. Someone who got a fever is detected by the sensor and the server-side epidemic simulation is triggered. Each student who installed the client-side risk assessment module in his/her smart phone receives the real-time personalized exposed risk score when an epidemic outbreak on the NTU campus. The study proposed a location-based framework for measuring real-time personalized exposed risk. Each student at the campus could understand the spatial diffusion of disease transmission and make better spatial decisions based on personalized exposed risk scores.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

A spatial view in the culture heritage domain

Culture heritage institutions are hosting digital historic map collection and the collections more and more allow spatial-temporal searching and georeferencing of its maps. At the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (SLUB) this lead to the development of the Virtual Map Forum 2.0, which is a spatial data infrastructure (SDI) for searching, visualization and georeferencing plane survey sheets. This SDI mainly relies on OpenLayers 3, Mapserver, GeoNetwork and GDAL. Beside that, tools for automatic georeferencing based on image recognition software have been developed and compared with the use of crowdsourcing tools for georeferencing. A further topic, on which culture heritage institutions are focusing is enrichment, transformation and merging of existing heterogeneous metadata sets. The goal is to allow better searching and utilization approaches for digital and analog objects. In the SLUB this lead to the development of the open source ETL-tool d:swarm, which supports the transformation and enrichment of metadata records. This opens possibilities for adding spatial identifier to large amounts of library objects, like pictures, newspaper articles or books and through this allows for a greater consideration of the spatial dimension in discovery systems. Another big topic is long term preservation, which becomes even more important with the growing number of digital native publications and datasets. Libraries and archives as experts of long term preservation and spatial data infrastructure provider, which are confronted with tasks and questions regarding the preservation of content. They therefor can benefit from an exchange of knowledge and work between each other. The presentation will give an insight into the world of culture heritage institutions. It will present topics, where FOSS4G and libraries can benefit from each other. Therefore it discusses different issues from within the SLUB where FOSS4G is used or could be used and spatial issues are affected. The main topics are spatial-temporal searching and visualization, georeferencing, metadata enrichment and long-term preservation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OGC GeoPackage in practice: Implementing a new OGC specification with open-source tools

GeoPackage is a new encoding standard created by the Open Geospatial Consortium as a modern alternative to formats like SDTS and Shapefile. Using SQLite, the single-file relational database can hold raster imagery, vector features and metadata. GeoPackage is an ideal data container for mobile devices such as smartphones, IoT devices, wearables, and even automobiles. We have created a few open-source tools to manipulate this exciting technology in a way that is useful to the geospatial community. Our goal with the GeoPackage specification implementations is simple: Create GeoPackages quickly and reliably while maintaining standard conformance. The single biggest issue we have faced is the speed in which large amounts of imagery can be disseminated to the end user. Data standards reliability was also a concern because we found many vendors interpreted the specification differently or to suite their own needs. Finally, the main problem GeoPackage was created was to solve was interoperability. We set out to create an implementation that would guide other parties towards making a data product that would function as well on one platform as it would on a completely different platform. Our initial implementation of the GeoPackage specification was created using Python 2.7.x. The software design was intended for command line use only in a script-friendly environment where tiling speed was paramount. The Gdal2tiles.py script was improved upon by harnessing the Python multiprocessing library so that multiple tile jobs could run simultaneously. The other piece of the workflow, creating GeoPackages, would be a separate development effort from scratch called tiles2gpkg parallel.py. In tiles2gpkg parallel.py, we implemented multiprocessing by writing to separate SQLite databases in parallel and then merging the tiled data sets into one compact database. This implementation worked well and increased the performance of producing these data sets; however, the command line design means that all but the most technically adept users would struggle to use the tools. With the initial Python implementation getting early-adopters a preview of GeoPackage in the short term, our team set out to make a production-quality GeoPackage API that could satisfy all user needs. Named Software to Aggregate Geospatial Data or SWAGD, we created a robust library for tiling raster data, packaging raster data stores into GeoPackages, and viewing either the raw tiles OR the finished GeoPackage products within a map viewer. Additionally, a Geopackage verification tool was created to foster community adoption. For more information, see our Github site here: https://github.com/GitHubRGI/swagd. Many open-source tools are being leveraged on the SWAGD project, including many common build and continuous integration tools including Github, TravisCI, WaffleIO, and Coverity. Using proven software development mechanisms like unit testing and code reviews we now have a consistent, reproducible, and inclusive GeoPackage implementation. We have an aggressive list of future capability that we would like to develop including ad-hoc routing on a mobile device, vector tile data sets, and even 3D support.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

ZOO-Project 1.5.0: News about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) available under a MIT/X-11 style license and currently in incubation at OSGeo. ZOO-Project provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easily create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.5.0 release. A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. An overview of the ZOO-Project will then serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.5.0 release and highlight their interests for applications developers and users. Evolutions and enhancements of the ZOO-Project WPS server (ZOO-Kernel) will first be detailed especially regarding compliancy (WPS 1.0.0 and 2.0), performance and scalability. The ZOO-Project optional support for Orfeo Toolbox and SAGA GIS will then be introduced, with details on the numerous new WPS Services (ZOO-Services) they provide. Use and connexion with other reliable open source libraries such as GDAL, GEOS, MapServer, GRASS GIS, CGAL will also be reviewed. Examples of concrete applications will finally be shown in order to illustrate how ZOO-Project components (ZOO-Kernel, ZOO-Services, ZOO-API and ZOO-Client) can be used together as a platform to build standard compliant advanced geospatial applications. Along with the new 1.5 release, this talk will also present how ZOO-Project is being developed, extended and maintained in the context of the EU funded PublicaMundi research project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Leaflet vs. OpenLayers: which is best for our indoor maps?

Leaflet and OpenLayers are two well-known javascript libraries for embedding interactive maps in a web page, and each of them comes with pros and cons which are not obvious. Having worked with both libraries for indoor applications, we will in this presentation offer insight on which of them is more suited to a variety of situations and requirements, and which challenges they should overcome in the future.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Taking dynamic web mapping to 1:100000 scale

CartoDB is growing to be one of the biggest mapping platform for the masses, being powered by a fully open-source stack, with PostgreSQL, PostGIS, Mapnik and Leaflet at its core. Our aim is to democratize map and geographical data visualization, making it easy for non-GIS people to create simple maps using the CartoDB Editor, but still keeping all the power and flexibility of the underlying components available to advanced users, with a variety of building blocks ranging from the frontend with CartoDB.js and Torque to the backend with the Map, SQL and Import API, parts of what we call the CartoDB Platform. Serving dozens of millions of map tiles daily has its own set of problems, but when they are being created by hundreds of thousands of users (which have their own database and can alter everything from styling, to the data sources and the SQL queries applied) everything turns out to be a big source of challenges, both development and operationally speaking. This talk will go through our general architecture, some of the decisions we’ve had to take, the things we’ve learned and the problems we’ve had to tackle through the way of getting CartoDB to scale at our level of growth, and how we're giving back to the community what we've discovered though the process.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Earning Your Support Instead of Buying it: A How-to Guide to Open Source Assistance

More organisations are moving to use FOSS4G software to cover shrinking budgets. It is very appealing to an organization’s leaders to ditch their current proprietary software solution with the attendant saving on per user licences and ongoing maintenance costs. Obviously, if you switched to FOSS4G to get better features and scalability you should consider buying a support contract from one of the many vendors that offer them, these companies support many of the core developers directly. This way you get all the advantages of open source, prompt support and often the chance to ask for new features. However, if you (or your boss) are looking to save money then you are moving from a cash economy to a gift economy. In a gift culture you need to build up your “capital” before attempting to take too much out. For example, you’ve downloaded the software and installed it, and all looks good. Then disaster hits, you have a demo for the CIO and nothing's working; Time to hit the user list, the developer list, stack exchange. Why can’t you get an answer? Remember just because your issue is urgent to you the developers might be in the middle of a new release or adding a new feature and have more important (or fun) things to do with their time. They will notice they have never seen your name before on the list, or on Stack Exchange that you have a reputation in the single digits – thus you are a newbie. There’s no harm in that but wouldn’t it be better to have got that out of the way before your emergency. You could have built up your reputation by asking some questions earlier especially questions like “what can I do to help?” or “I found an unclear paragraph in the install instructions, how do I fix it for you?” on a mailing list. On StackExchange you can build reputation by asking good questions and by answering other people’s questions. Once you’ve banked some capital there are still good and bad ways of asking a question. Developers are busy people (the GeoTools users list has 20-30 messages a day for example) no one has time to read all of them closely. If you use a poor subject (e.g. "Help!!!!") or don’t provide a clear description of the problem (e.g. “it crashes”) then the odds of being ignored are huge. It can be tempting once you have found a helpful developer to keep emailing them directly, but this is likely to lead a polite(ish) reminder to keep to the list so that everyone can benefit or silence. This talk will show how to be a better open source citizen and get a better answer than RTFM when your project is stuck and the demo is the next day. The author will share his experience with helping users and developers on the GeoTools and GeoServer mailing lists and as a moderator on gis.stackexchange.com.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

WPS Benchmarking Session

The yearly Web Processing Service (WPS) benchmark. Variuos WPS implementations will be tested regarding their capabilities, compliancy to the standard and performance. Traditionally, each participating project designates individuals from their community to participate in this talk to introduce their project and summarize its key features. The focus this year will be on compliancy and interoperability. We will present the test set-up, participating WPS projects and the results of the benchmark.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Saving Rapid Urbanizing Cities using the FOSS4G Based Spatial Analysis for Urban Development

Early stages of urban developments such as housing construction, new town development and urban regeneration are performed through the spatial analysis using the topographic map, cadastral map, zoning map and other various kind of thematic maps for the proposed site analysis, feasibility analysis and evaluation of urban development alternatives. For these analyses, urban developers traditionally have used commercial software like ArcGIS to analyze these kinds of projects. And giant Korean public urban developer like Korea land and Housing Corporation (LH) has support these projects based on the in-house enterprise GIS system. But developing countries facing rapid urbanization near the peripheral areas of metropolitan region cannot handle such problems only using the commercial software. They need knowledge and experience about the urban development rather than complicated software based analysis techniques or large investments on the enterprise GIS system. In this sense, FOSS4G (Free Open Source Software for Geospatial) are very useful tools in that they are easy to learn, use and also relatively cheap to maintain. LH has accumulated a lot of urban development cases and wants to store this knowledge to FOSS4G based spatial analysis as a rule base. By doing so, it can manage the fast growing cities sustainable. In this presentation, we will show some conceived urban development project faced by the rapid urbanizing cities and suggest FOSS4G based spatial analysis method using the FOSS4G like QGIS plug-in.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Gis Server with Golang.

GIS Server architecture with Golang. Find the better way of Golang GIS Server.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Dynamic analysis, reporting and visualization of metadata catalogue

More and more geospatial resources (datasets, services, maps, ...) are described in metadata catalogs. Now, users need to be able to get an overview of the resources available (eg. data quality, dissemination formats) for evaluating their data policies. This could be achieve with tools for analyzing and reporting on large sets of information and dynamically compute reports and build dashboards. This presentation will show how to collect information from CSW catalogs, compute reports and indicators and build and publish online dashboards using Solr and banana opensource projects. This will be illustrated by the INSPIRE Directive monitoring in Europe and the MedSea project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Use case of Disaster Management System by using Geopaparazzi and MapGuide Open Source

In recent years, large-scale disasters have occurred in the countries of Asia including Japan, rapid collection and sharing of disaster information is required in order to provide relief and support speedy restoration of civic services. This presentation discusses the integration and customization of FOSS4G field survey tools and Web GIS server to facilitate aggregation and rapid sharing of disaster related field information. Further, the system also provide realtime interaction between field party and coordination team. A case study of practical use of the system at the Osaka Water General Service (OWGS) Corporation will be demonstrated to present the salient features of the system. The main capability of the system usability is normal as well as disaster situation will be highlighted.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Protecting the Planet with Postgis: How we are calculating complex protected area coverage statistics for all countries in the world.

ProtectedPlanet.net is the online interface for the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA), a joint project of IUCN and UNEP, and the most comprehensive global database on terrestrial and marine protected areas. The WDPA is released every month and consists of a point and polygon dataset of over 210 000 entries. Over 91% of this data is in polygon format and the remaining 8% are points that can have an area as attribute. Displaying protected area coverage statistics is one of the main features of this website. It is very important for the users to know what percentage of the territory is covered by protected areas in a given country, region or the entire planet. Previously, these statistics were calculated manually and every year a team spends several days calculating them for a report using ESRI Software. We had a great challenge this time: Can we automatically calculate the statistics every month for all the protected areas and countries in the entire planet? In this case time matters: if we want to calculate statistics every month, it can't take 2 or 3 days of processing. To work through this, we chose a full open source solution with PostGIS to do all the back end tasks that we need to calculate statistics. We were able to limit all this to 6 hours and we can now run automatically every month keeping coverage statistics up to date.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Big data analysis with Tile Reduce and Turf.js

Tile Reduce is a new open source map reduce frame work for analyzing massive geo data. Tile reduce is a tile analysis framework built on the javascript GIS library Turf.js. It runs on your local computer or in the AWS cloud and scales to run thousands of processors in parallel. At Mapbox we use Tile Reduce to detect issues in global street vector data like OpenStreetMap, data comparison and data conflation. This talk will walk through the architecture of Tile Reduce, highlight advantages, limitations and future developments.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Dynamic dashboards with D3.js and CartoDB

NextGIS has been busy working on a new stack of geospatial software for the past few years and we're finally ready to present what we've accomplished. Our stack consists of 4 major components: web (NextGIS Web), mobile (NextGIS Mobile), desktop (NextGIS QGIS) and data management (NextGIS Manager). Three of those components are brand new, developed by NextGIS alone and were released just recently. For the fourth component, we participate in QGIS development since 2008 and use its codebase for our desktop component. The main focus of the stack is tight integration, ease of use and modularity. New stack features unique features, to name just the few: plugable renderers for NextGIS Web, multi-layer support for NextGIS Mobile, super-fast rendering and great formats support for NextGIS Manager and all-around integration with NextGIS QGIS. The presentation will provide an overview and will look at general architecture, use cases and plans for future development.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:03:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

FOSS4G Seoul 2015 - panel discussion

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Don't Copy Data! Instead, Share it at Web-Scale

Since its start in 2006, Amazon Web Services has grown to over 40 different services. Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), our object store, and one of our first services, is now home to trillions of objects and core to many enterprise applications. S3 is used to store many kinds of data, including geo, genomic, and video data and facilitates parallel access to big data. Netflix considers S3 the source of truth for all its data warehousing.The goal of this presentation is to illustrate best practice for open or shared geo-data in the cloud. To do so, it showcases a simple map tiling architecture, running on top of data stored in S3 and uses CloudFront (CDN), Elastic Beanstalk (Application Management), and EC2 (Compute) in combination with FOSS4G tools. The demo uses the USDA��s NAIP dataset (48TB), plus other higher resolution city data, to show how you can build global mapping services without pre-rendering tiles. Because the GeoTIFFs are stored in a requester-pays S3 bucket, anyone with an AWS account has immediate access to the source GeoTIFFs at the infrastructure level, allowing for parallel access by other systems and if necessary, bulk export. However, I will show that the cloud, because it supports both highly available and flexible compute, makes it unnecessary to move data, pointing to a new paradigm, made possible by cloud computing, where one set of GeoTIFFs can act as an authoritative source for any number of users.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Geopaparazzi, state of the art

Geopaparazzi is an application for fast field surveys. Its simplicity and the possibility to use it on as good as any android smartphone makes it a trusty field companion for engineers and geologists, but also for tourists who wish to keep a geodiary and any user that needs to be aware of his position even in offline mode. In Geopaparazzi it is possible to create text, picture and sketch notes and place them on the map. Notes can also be complex and form based in order to standardize surveys in which many people need to be coordinated. In the last years the support for the visualization of spatialite vector layers and recently also editing possibilities for spatialite poligonal datasets has been added, allowing for some simple-yet-powerfull possibilities on vector data. Desktop tools are supplied to bring datasets from the GIS environment to Geopaparazzi and back. The presentation will focus on the most important features of Geopaparazzi as well as the latest additions to the application in order to give a complete idea of the state of the art of the project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

ngeo: a companion library for OpenLayers 3

ngeo is an open-source JavaScript library that aims to ease the development of web GIS applications based on AngularJS and OpenLayers 3. More specifically, ngeo provides Angular components, namely "services" and "directives", that can be combined together in different ways, based on the need of the application. This talk is a general presentation of ngeo. We will present some of the features provided by the library, through concrete examples. We will also present the design choices we have made, and why we have made this design choices. AngularJS, as a very popular framework, has received (severe) criticism lately. We will report on our experience with AngularJS, discuss its "good parts", and how we mitigate its "bad parts". With ngeo we define ? what we think ? is a good way to use AngularJS. ngeo, for example, includes guidelines for application developers, which have turned out to be key for the development of robust and high-performance applications. This talk is for anyone interested in AngularJS and OpenLayers 3. Come to this talk if you're interested to know how we use ngeo to develop applications combining AngularJS and OpenLayers 3.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:14 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Cadasta: Securing Property Rights with Open-Source

Much of the world currently does not have secure property and land tenure rights. Communities and individuals need low-cost tools to enable them to advocate for themselves. The Cadasta Foundation is building an open-source platform to securely enable these groups to document their land rights. This talk will review the design decisions taken into account, the technology underlying Cadasta, and the future road map. Individuals interested in land rights management and/or the challenges in implementing technology in difficult environments will be especially interested in this presentation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)