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22:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Analyzing Fire Department Response with PostGIS

Local government fire departments always face scrutiny of their performance and efficiency. They are continuously asked to do a better job with fewer resources. In this highly technical session we will show how PostGIS is being used to analyze and measure performance throughout the city and plan for future resource requirements. Every city we work with is unique in some way. Some fire departments act as the local ambulance service while other cities contract with private ambulance companies. Emergency “911” response centers are often managed by police/law enforcement departments but not always! Many cities also have “mutual aid” agreements with neighboring cities to assist them when needed. For our customers PostGIS stores and manages the geo-located events (fires, hazardous spills, etc.) and provides details about the departments and individual emergency vehicle performance. It is most interestingly used to create statistical reports about things such as “Effecive Response Force” and “Resource Drawdown”, which are used to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. Please come to learn how PostGIS is used to analyze things such as primary response areas and fire hazard severity zones, allowing our customers to ask more advanced, geographically based questions.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Semantic assessment and monitoring of crowdsourced geographic information

Whilst opensource software allows for the transparent collection of crowdsourced geographic information, in order for this material to be of value it is crucial that it be trusted. A semantic assessment of a feature’s attributes against ontologies representative of features likely to reside in this location provides an indication of how likely it is that the information submitted actually represents what is on the ground. This trust rating can then be incorporated into provenance information to provide users of the dataset an indication of each feature’s likely accuracy. Further to this, querying of provenance information can identify the features with the highest/lowest trust rating at a point in time. This presentation uses crowdsourced data detailing the location of fruit trees as a case study to demonstrate these concepts. Submissions of such crowdsourced information – by way of, say, an OpenLayers frontend – allow for the collection of both coordinate and attribute data. The location data indicates the relevant ontologies – able to be developed in Protégé – that describe the fruit trees likely to be encountered. If the fruit name associate with a submitted feature is not found in this area (e.g. a coconut tree in Alaska) then, by way of this model, the feature is determined to be inaccurate and given a low trust rating. Note that the model does not deem the information wrong or erase it, simply unlikely to be correct and deemed to be of questionable trust. The process continues by comparing submitted attribute data with the information describing the type of fruit tree – such as height – that is contained in the relevant ontologies. After this assessment of how well the submitted feature “fits” with its location the assigned trust rating is added to the feature’s provenance information via a semantic provenance model (akin to the W3C’s OPM). Use of such semantic web technologies then allows for querying to identify lower quality (less trustworthy) features and the reasons for their uncertainty (whether it be an issue with collection – such as not enough attribute data being recorded; time since collection – given degradation of data quality over time, i.e. older features are likely less accurate than newer ones; or because of a major event that could physically alter/remove the actual element, like a storm or earthquake). The tendency for crowdsourced datasets to be continually updated and amended means they are effectively dynamic when compared to more traditional datasets that are generally fixed to a set period/point in time. This requires them to be easily updated; however, it is important that efforts are directed at identifying and strengthening the features which represent the weakest links in the dataset. This is achievable through the use of opensource software and methods detailed in this presentation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Image Geocoding as a Service

Driven by the ambition of a global geocoding solution, in this paper we present the architecture of an image geocoding service. It takes advantage of the ubiquity of cameras, that are present in almost all smartphones. It is an inexpensive sensor yet powerful, that can be used to provide precise location and orientation. This geocoding service provides an API similar to existing ones for place names and addresses, like Google Geocoding API. Instead of a text based query, images can be submitted to estimate the location and orientation of the user. Developers can use this new API, keeping almost all the existing code already used for other geocoding APIs. Behind the scenes, image features are extracted from the submitted photograph, and compared against a huge database of georeferenced models. These models were constructed using structure from motion (SFM) techniques, and heavily reduced to a representative set of all information using Synthetic Views. Our preliminary results shows that the pose estimation of the majority of the images submitted to our geocoding was successfully computed (more than 60%) with the mean positional error around 2 meters. With this service, an inexpensive outdoor/indoor location service can be provided, for example, for urban environments, where GPS fails.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Magical PostGIS in three brief movements

Everyone knows you can query a bounding box or even spatially join tables in PostGIS, but what about more advanced magic? This short symphony of PostGIS examples will look at using advanced features of PostGIS and PostgreSQL to accomplish surprising results: * Using full text search to build a spatially interactive web form. * Using raster functionality to look into the future. * Using standard PostgreSQL features to track and visualize versioning in data. PostGIS is a powerful tool on it's own, but combined with the features of PostgreSQL, it is almost magical.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Intelligent SDIs with MapMint 2.0

This conference aims at presenting the status of the MapMint open source project and its upcoming 2.0 version. The upgrade to newer versions of its core open source components will first be explained. The extensive use of OGC standards through ZOO-Project 1.5, GDAL 1.11 and MapServer 7 is indeed making MapMint an even more stable and efficient foundation to build an open source and standard-compliant spatial data infrastructure. The new metadata related functionalities being developed in interaction with PyCSW and CKAN will also be presented along with the assets of the CSW standard support. The new MapMint responsive user interfaces based on OpenLayers 3 and Bootstrap will also be presented. Both code and documentation improvements will also be detailed. The newly added functionalities in MapMint 2.0 will finally be explained from the developer and user point of views, based on case studies and live examples.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Advanced Security with GeoServer and GeoFence

The presentation will provide an introduction to GeoServer own authentication and authorization subsystems. We’ll cover the supported authentication protocols, such as from basic/digest authentication and CAS support, check through the various identity providers, such as local config files, database tables and LDAP servers, and how it’s possible to combine the various bits in a single comprehensive authentication tool, as well as providing examples of custom authentication plugins for GeoServer, integrating it in a home grown security architecture. We’ll then move on to authorization, describing the GeoServer pluggable authorization mechanism and comparing it with proxy based solution, and check the built in service and data security system, reviewing its benefits and limitations. Finally we’ll explore the advanced authentication provider, GeoFence, explore the levels on integration with GeoSErver, from the simple and seamless direct integration to the more sophisticated external setup, and see how it can provide GeoServer with complex authorization rules over data and OGC services, taking into account the current user, OGC request and requested layers to enforce spatial filters and alphanumeric filters, attribute selection as well as cropping raster data to areas of interest.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OSGeo and LocationTech Comparison

We have two great organizations supporting our Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial: The Open Source Geospatial Foundation and LocationTech. Putting on events like FOSS4G is primary responsibility of these software foundations - supporting our great open source software is! This talk will introduce OSGeo and LocationTech, and balance the tricky topic of comparison for those interested in what each organisation offers. We will also look at areas where these organizations are collaboration and explore possibilities for future work. Each of these software foundations support for their existing projects, ranging from "release parties" such as OSGeo Live or the Eclipse Annual Release. We are also interested in the ��incubation�� process each provides to onboard new projects. Review of the incubation provides an insight into an organization's priorities. This talks draws the incubation experience of: * GeoServer (OSGeo), GeoTools (OSGeo), * GeoGig (LocationTech), uDig (LocationTech) If you are an open source developer interested in joining a foundation we will cover some of the resource, marking and infrastructure benefits that may be a factor for consideration. We will also looking into some of the long term benefits a software foundation provides both you and importantly users of your software. If you are a team members faced with the difficult choice of selecting open source technologies this talk can help. We can learn a lot about the risks associated with open source based on how each foundation seeks to protect you. The factors a software foundation considers for its projects provide useful criteria you can use to evaluate any projects.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Satellite Snow Cover Products Evaluation and Validation Platform Developed Entirely With Floss Software

The monitoring of snow cover extent is important for the management of natural resource, extreme events prediction such as snowmelt floods, avalanches etc. The current status is that the network of weather stations is too sparse in regions with seasonal snow cover to provide reliable snow monitoring and impact applications. Remote sensing can regularly provide maps of snow cover extent, under limitations imposed by satellite cycles or cloud cover. A number of daily or synthesis snow cover extent products, covering Romania, with different resolutions and specifications, are available for free (e.g. GLOBSNOW, CryoLand, H-SAF, IMS). These products were homogenized and included, along with reference and in-situ data, into an application that make possible for user to inspect, process, analyze and validate the information, using a web based interface. The platform, created by National Meteorological Administration of Romania offers services based on Open Geospatial Consortium standards for data retrieval (WMS, WCS, WFS) and server-side processing (WPS, WCPS). The services were built upon open source solutions such as GeoServer, OpenLayers, GeoExt, PostgreSQL, GDAL, rasdaman. The application is composed of several software modules/services. The modules are split into two categories: server-side modules/services and client side modules - responsible for interaction with the user. A typical usage scenario assumes the following steps: 1. The user is operating the client functionality to select a temporal and spatial slice from a product cube (e.g. 5 months archive of daily CryoLand FSC data); 2. The users select a statistic method to be applied; 3. The request is sent to the server side processing applications wrapped as WPS or WCPS calls; 4. The process will trim/slice the coverage cube, perform the statistic operation for the pixels within the ROI for each day in the selected time interval; 5. The results are sent back encoded in a standard file format; 6. The web client display the results in a relevant form.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoServer for Spatio-temporal Data Handling With Examples For MetOc And Remote Sensing

This presentation will provide detailed information on how to ingest and configure SpatioTemporal in GeoServer to be served using OGC services, with examples from WMS and WCS services. Topics covered are as follows: * Discussion over existing data formats and how to preprocess them for best serving with GeoServer * Configuring SpatioTemporal raster and vector data in GeoServer * Serving SpatioTemporal raster and vector data with OGC Services Tips and techniques to optimize performance and allow maximum exploitation of the available data The attendees will be provided with the basic knowledge needed to preprocess and ingest the most common spatiotemporal data from the MetOc and Remote Sensing field for serving via GeoServer.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions. Advancements and improvements for the management of multidimensional raster data (NetCDF, GRIB, HDF) and mosaic thereof will be introduced, as well as the available ways to manage sliding windows of data via the REST API and importer. Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields, including support for WCS EO and WMS EO, and some considerations on the WCS MetOc extensions. The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on jai-ext, imageio-ext, and JAITools. jai-ext provides extended JAI operators that correctly handle NODATA and regione of interests (masks), JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support, while ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries. The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoCouch: Operating multidimensional data at scale with Couchbase

Couchbase is a distributed document-oriented NoSQL database. You store the data as JSON and then build indexes with simple JavaScript functions. This talk is about the multidimensional index capability of Couchbase. This means you can index not only geographic data (encoded as GeoJSON) but any additional numeric attributes you like. Such a multidimensional query might be used for an application about car sharing. You would e.g. query for all the cars in a certain area, but you're also interested in additional attributes. Let's say you want to display only cars where at least four people fit in. Or you want one with air-conditioning. Such attributes would be the additional dimensions. In this case it would be 4-dimensional query, two for the location and two for additional attributes. Quite often GeoHash is used for implementing a spatial index, which has some limitations. A notable one is that you need to know that maximum range of your data upfront as it's a space partitioning algorithm. It is good enough for purely geospatial data, but as soon as additinal attributes like time are needed, it might become an issue. GeoCouch takes a more traditional approach like PostGIS and uses an R-tree which is data partitioning, hence you don't need to know the extent up-front. Another focus of this talk will be on the operational strengths Couchbase has. One thing is the web interface that makes administrating clusters very easy, even when there's a failure. The other thing is that you can easily restart servers, e.g. when a Linux Kernel upgrade is due, without any downtime on the full cluster. The system stays operational and handles those upgrades gracefully. In the end you will have a good overview on why you really want to use a multidimensional indexing for your remote sensing data or points of interest in your location aware mobile app. GeoCouch is fully integrated into Couchbase, there's no additional setup needed to get started. All source code from Couchbase is licensed under the Apache 2.0 License. Links: - Couchbase: http://www.couchbase.com/ - Source code: https://github.com/couchbase/manifest - GeoCouch: https://github.com/couchbase/geocouch
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Fast Cache, Fresh data. Can we have it all?

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

CartoDB Basemaps: a tale of data, tiles, and dark matter sandwiches

CartoDB is an open souce tool and SaaS platform that allows users to make beautiful maps quickly and easily from their own data. To complement our users needs, we launched last year our free-to-use open source OSM based basemaps Positron and Dark Matter (https://github.com/CartoDB/CartoDB-basemaps), designed in collaboration with Stamen to complement data visualization. While architecturing them, we had several compromises in mind: they had to be powered by our existing infrastructure (powered by Mapnik and PostGIS at its core), they had to be scalable, cacheable but frequently updated, customizable, match with data overlays, and, last but not least, they had to be beautiful. This talk is the tale of the development process and tools we used, how we implemented and deployed them and the technology challenges that arose during the process of adapting a dynamic mapping infrastructure as CartoDB to the data scale of OSM, including styling, caching, and scalability, and how (we think) we achieved most of those. I will also talk about the future improvements that we are exploring about mixing the combination of basemap rendering with data from other sources, and how you can replicate and tweak those maps on your own infrastructure.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Geodata for Everyone - Model-driven development and an example of INSPIRE WFS service

In denmark the public authorities register various core information about individuals, businesses, real properties, buildings, addresses, ect.. This information is re-used throughout the public sector. It is a challenge for public authorities to re-use data from different providers to perform their tasks properly and efficiently across units, administrations and sectors. Therefore all the authoritative basic data should be defined and standardized according to the same methods. Danish Geodata agency as Denmark's central public source of geographic data has established a set of guidelines for future modelling of spatial data for distributing them as open geographic data. Based on the guidelines a model-driven process has also been established. It starts from the data modelling in UML to the end where data are distributed through WFS services and download services. One INSPIRE WFS service will be used as a concrete example.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Sensor up your connected applications with OGC SensorThings API

This introduction will give an introduction and live demonstration of the OGC SensorThings API. The OGC SensorThings API provides an open and unified way to interconnect the Internet of Things (IoT) devices, data, and applications over the Web. The OGC SensorThings API is a new OGC standard candidate. Unlike many existing OGC standards, SensorThings API is very simple and efficient. At the same time, it is also comprehensive and designed to handle complex use cases. It builds on a rich set of proven-working and widely-adopted open standards, such as the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, including the ISO/OGC Observation and Measurement (O&M) and Sensor Observation Services (SOS). The main difference between the SensorThings API and the OGC SOS is that the SensorThings API is designed specifically for the resource-constrained IoT devices and the Web developer community. As a result, the SensorThings API follows the REST principles, the use of an efficient JSON encoding, and the use of the flexible OASIS OData protocol and URL conventions. In addition to introduce the specification, this talk will also demonstrate an end-to-end IoT application based on the SensorUp IoT platform, an open source implementation of the SensorThings API, including a server, javascript library, web dashboard and a Arduino library.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Opening Address Data around the World

With over 110 million points, OpenAddresses.io has grown to be the largest open database of address data in the world. Governments, developers and businesses are realizing that address data belongs in a commons where it can be easily maintained, used by all, and drive economic growth. These early efforts are now powering some of the world's best commercial geocoding systems, as well as crucial infrastructure like emergency responders. But there's more work to do. We need to reform outdated laws, expand coverage to new cultural contexts, untangle shortsighted licenses, and invent new modes of collaboration between the public and government. We'll cover how OpenAddresses started, how it can be used today, and how we expect it to grow into a definitive global resource.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Route Planning in your Database with pgRouting

pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide shortest path search and other network analysis functionality. This presentation will show the inside and current state of the pgRouting development, from its wide range of shortest path search algorithms to driving distance calculation or Traveling Sales Person (TSP) optimization. Additionally we will give a brief outlook and introduction of upcoming new features like the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) solver, and what we have in mind for future releases. We will explain the shortest path search in real road networks and how the data structure is important to get better routing results. Furthermore we will show how you can improve the quality of the search with dynamic costs and make the result look closer to the reality. You will also learn about difficulties and limitations of the library, and when pgRouting might not be not the right tool to solve your routing problem.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:32 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Research client side draggable route selection with pgRouting

pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide shortest path search and other network analysis functionality such as alternative K-Shortest path selection. But, in some case, client side draggable route selection (like Google Maps Direction or OSRM) is preferable. This presentation will research what is necessary to realize such client side draggle route selection with pgRouting, then try to implement the functionality to some browser(Leaflet, OpenLayers .etc) and desktop(QGIS .etc) client.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
06:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

PostTrajectory : Querying and Managing GPS and Trajectories on Postgresql/PostGIS

Recently, many services regarding moving object have been studied with using location information as mobile devices and systems are advancing. Trajectory is the data which information of the location by the time. The current database system is not defined that to store of the moving object data type. Therefore, the location information of object can be stored, but it is difficult to store those location information and time information together. In this paper, the extended system which can store the trajectory of the moving object by using PostgreSQL and PostGIS used as spatial database is designed and implemented.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness. Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate appealing, informative, readable maps that can be quickly rendered on screen.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:02 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Improving public health delivery in northern Nigeria using open source technologies

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

A framework for assessing location-based personalized exposure risk of infectious disease transmission

Human mobility is an important risk factor affecting disease transmission. Therefore, understanding detailed spatial behaviors and interactions among individuals is a fundamental issue. Past studies using high-resolution human contacts data from smart phones with GPS logs have captured spatial-temporal heterogeneity and daily contact patterns among individuals. However, measuring personalized exposed risk of infectious disease transmission is still under development. The purpose of the study is to establish a location-based framework for assessing personalized exposed risk of infectious disease transmission. The framework consists of three components: the first is client-side smart phone-based risk assessment module. We developed Android application for collecting real-time location data and displaying the personalized exposed risk score. The second component is the server-side epidemic simulation model. The simulation model calculated the personalized exposed risk score based on real-time GPS logs and individual mobility data from the client-side Android application. The last component is the disease alarm device for triggering the service-side epidemic simulation model. We installed infrared sensors in people-gathering areas as the alarm device to monitor human body temperature for detecting fever syndrome. We used NTU main campus as a pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of the framework. We analyzed the records of students’ taking course and modeled the spatial interaction relationships among classroom buildings due to students’ mobility around the campus. Someone who got a fever is detected by the sensor and the server-side epidemic simulation is triggered. Each student who installed the client-side risk assessment module in his/her smart phone receives the real-time personalized exposed risk score when an epidemic outbreak on the NTU campus. The study proposed a location-based framework for measuring real-time personalized exposed risk. Each student at the campus could understand the spatial diffusion of disease transmission and make better spatial decisions based on personalized exposed risk scores.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GIS-modelling of long-term consequences after a nuclear accident.

In order to evaluate consequences of deposited radioactive cesium (and other radioactive substances) in natural systems a GIS based model called Stratos has been developed. This model incorporates information regarding deposition, transfer to vegetation and animals, intervention levels and geographical distribution of animals. The presentation will use a case study which describes the possible environmental consequences for Norway due to a hypothetical accident at the Sellafield complex in the UK. The scenario considered involves an explosion and fire at the B215 facility resulting in a 1 % release of the total HAL 1 inventory of radioactive waste with a subsequent air transport and deposition in Norway. Air transport modeling is based on real meteorological data from October 2008 with wind direction towards Norway and heavy precipitation. This weather is considered to be quite representative as typical seasonal weather. Based on this weather scenario, the estimated fallout in Norway will be ~17 PBq of cesium-137 which is 7 times higher than fallout after the Chernobyl accident. The modeled radioactive contamination is linked with data on transfer to the food chain and statistics on production and hunting to assess the consequences for foodstuffs. The investigation has been limited to the terrestrial environment, focusing on wild berries, fungi, and animals grazing unimproved pastures (i.e. various types of game, reindeer, sheep and goats). The results of a model-run are maps for the chosen products, with categorized colors - giving the degree of consequences. A linked text file gives relevant numeric values for each color. The Stratos model is written in python which calls GRASS-functions and uses as gui for model setup. The model has been used for two reports at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, and is currently being used and developed further in the "Centre for Environmental Radioactivity" (CERAD), cerad.nmbu.no.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Case study: A full-fledged cutting-edge FOSS4G map production system

The development and the usage of National Land Survey of Finland's dynamic and high performance map production system is described in this presentation. The system is currently in use and serves map images both to customers and to NLSFI production systems. The data in the map production system are open data and being updated on a weekly basis. When the data get updated, a RSS-feed is generated. Based on the feed, the map products are updated. Data is stored, updated and replicated in PostGIS. Map pictures are rendered in GeoServer. The visualization of the maps is based on SLD-stylesheets. SLD-stylesheets enable the same data to be visualized in several different ways. GeoServer in conjunction with SLD-stylesheets offers a Web Map Service (WMS). Map images are delivered via a high performance MapCache Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) and as image files via NLSFI download service. The system is designed to be expandable and is currently being further developed to enable the pro-duction of on-demand printed maps.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Open Source and Open Standard based decision support system: the example of lake Verbano floods management.

The Locarno area (Switzerland, Canton Ticino) is exposed to lake floods with a return period of about 7-8 years. The risk is of particular concern because the area is located in a floodplain that registered in the last decades a great increase in settlement and values of the real estates. Moreover small differences in lake altitude may produce a significant increase in flooded area due to the very low average slope of the terrain. While fatalities are not generally registered, several important economic costs are associated, e.g.: damages to real estates, interruption of activities, evacuation and relocation and environmental damages. While important events were registered in 1978, 1993, 2000, 2002 and 2014 the local stakeholder invested time and money in the set-up of an up-to-date decision support system that allows for the reduction of risks. Thanks to impressive technological advances the visionary concept of the Digital Earth (Gore 1992, 1998) is being realizing: geospatial coverages and monitoring systems data are increasingly available on the Web, and more importantly, in a standard format. As a result, today is possible to develop innovative decision support systems which mesh-up several information sources and offers special features for risk scenarios evaluation. In agreement with the exposed view, the authors have recently developed a new Web system whose design is based on the Service Oriented Architecture pattern. Open source software (e.g.: Geoserver, PostGIS, OpenLayers) has been used throughout the whole system and geospatial Open Standards (e.g.: SOS, WMS, WFS) are the pillars it rely on. SITGAP 2.0, implemented in collaboration with the Civil protection of Locarno e Vallemaggia, combines a number of data sources such as the Federal Register of Buildings and Dwellings, the Cantonal Register of residents, the Cadastral Surveying, the Cantonal Hydro-meteorological monitoring observations, the Meteoswiss weather forecasts, and others. As a result of this orchestration of data, SITGAP 2.0 serves features that allows, for example, to be informed on active alarms, to visualize lake level forecasts and associated flooding areas, to evaluate and map exposed elements and people, to plan and manage evacuation by searching for people living in particular areas or buildings, by registering evacuation actions and by searching for evacuated people. System architecture and functionalities, and consideration on the integration and accessibility of the beneath information together with the lesson learnt during the usage of the system during the last floods of November 2014, provides interesting discussion points for the identification of current and future needs.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Decision-making system for grants for maintaning services in rural areas

Sweden is a sparsely populated country. Normally market forces would regulate the number and location of both public and commercial services as schools, medical care, grocery stores and pharmacies. In sparsely populated areas these forces does not work. The Swedish government has realized this and gives economical support to some services in order to maintain or in some cases expand the service level. The aim with this grants is to provide conditions for living, working and contribute to economic growth in these in remote areas. To be as effective as possible a decision making system has been developed to support the administrators of the grant. The system allows the administrators to monitor the current situation, update changes in the service structure and simulate fictive scenarios. The system is built on an open source platform and is available through the internet to authorized administrators on the regional level of the Swedish administration. As platform for the system the following open source projects and formats are used GeoExt, Ext JS, Openlayers, Mapfish, Pylons, GEOAlchemy, Mapserver, PostGIS, GeoJSON.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:21 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OGC GeoPackage in practice: Implementing a new OGC specification with open-source tools

GeoPackage is a new encoding standard created by the Open Geospatial Consortium as a modern alternative to formats like SDTS and Shapefile. Using SQLite, the single-file relational database can hold raster imagery, vector features and metadata. GeoPackage is an ideal data container for mobile devices such as smartphones, IoT devices, wearables, and even automobiles. We have created a few open-source tools to manipulate this exciting technology in a way that is useful to the geospatial community. Our goal with the GeoPackage specification implementations is simple: Create GeoPackages quickly and reliably while maintaining standard conformance. The single biggest issue we have faced is the speed in which large amounts of imagery can be disseminated to the end user. Data standards reliability was also a concern because we found many vendors interpreted the specification differently or to suite their own needs. Finally, the main problem GeoPackage was created was to solve was interoperability. We set out to create an implementation that would guide other parties towards making a data product that would function as well on one platform as it would on a completely different platform. Our initial implementation of the GeoPackage specification was created using Python 2.7.x. The software design was intended for command line use only in a script-friendly environment where tiling speed was paramount. The Gdal2tiles.py script was improved upon by harnessing the Python multiprocessing library so that multiple tile jobs could run simultaneously. The other piece of the workflow, creating GeoPackages, would be a separate development effort from scratch called tiles2gpkg parallel.py. In tiles2gpkg parallel.py, we implemented multiprocessing by writing to separate SQLite databases in parallel and then merging the tiled data sets into one compact database. This implementation worked well and increased the performance of producing these data sets; however, the command line design means that all but the most technically adept users would struggle to use the tools. With the initial Python implementation getting early-adopters a preview of GeoPackage in the short term, our team set out to make a production-quality GeoPackage API that could satisfy all user needs. Named Software to Aggregate Geospatial Data or SWAGD, we created a robust library for tiling raster data, packaging raster data stores into GeoPackages, and viewing either the raw tiles OR the finished GeoPackage products within a map viewer. Additionally, a Geopackage verification tool was created to foster community adoption. For more information, see our Github site here: https://github.com/GitHubRGI/swagd. Many open-source tools are being leveraged on the SWAGD project, including many common build and continuous integration tools including Github, TravisCI, WaffleIO, and Coverity. Using proven software development mechanisms like unit testing and code reviews we now have a consistent, reproducible, and inclusive GeoPackage implementation. We have an aggressive list of future capability that we would like to develop including ad-hoc routing on a mobile device, vector tile data sets, and even 3D support.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:36 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

On simulation and GIS, coupling and hydrology

This presentation shows how to better integrate simulation codes and Geographical Information Systems, and takes the example of Hydrological modelling integration into QGIS. Scientific modelling and simulations are present in a large number of areas. A significant proportion of simulation codes are applied spatially, at different levels, from a neighborhood scale up to worldwide areas. These simulation codes take spatial information as input data, and output results which are related to space too. But most of the time, they do not directly handle GIS data. Data types and data formats are different, and there is therefore a lot of effort to put into pre-processing and post-processing of the data to get it from GIS to the simulation codes and back. For example, determining the diffusion of a pollutant leak into underground water necessitates to get a DEM, location of the leak, geological data and more from the GIS, and transform it to simulation code input format. Then launch a simulation (on finite volumes e.g.), and convert the output into GIS files so that to be able to visualize spatial repartition of the pollutant according to time. The topic of this presentation is therefore to show how to better interact between simulation and GIS. We present the prevalent types of data for simulation, how they differ from GIS, and how we usually transfer from one type to another. Then we show how we worked towards better integration. Polygonal meshes are the most common way of representing 2D geometries for simulation purposes. Integrating simulation to a GIS requires storing georeferenced meshes in a databases (or using standard GIS file formats), and being able to use simulation values interpolated over the elements as a map layer. We show how to modify simulation codes to read directly a mesh from a GIS and write the results into a GIS. We implemented a new type of layer for QGIS, a mesh layer, which enables to display simulation results with high performances. This takes into account the temporal dimension. We also demonstrate how to integrate a simulation code into QGIS Processing so that it can be managed directly from within the desktop application. We illustrate these concepts with a demonstration of a full integration of a Hydrological simulation tool inside QGIS, with simulation management, custom user interface and strong integration of data between the simulation code and GIS data. In this sense the FREEWAT project started mid-2015, which aims at integrating multiple Hydrological codes into QGIS is also a good example of simulation and GIS integration. We end up with the perspectives for more global integration of simulation tools and GIS, and the work still to be done to bridge the gap between those two worlds.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

ZOO-Project 1.5.0: News about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) available under a MIT/X-11 style license and currently in incubation at OSGeo. ZOO-Project provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easily create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.5.0 release. A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. An overview of the ZOO-Project will then serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.5.0 release and highlight their interests for applications developers and users. Evolutions and enhancements of the ZOO-Project WPS server (ZOO-Kernel) will first be detailed especially regarding compliancy (WPS 1.0.0 and 2.0), performance and scalability. The ZOO-Project optional support for Orfeo Toolbox and SAGA GIS will then be introduced, with details on the numerous new WPS Services (ZOO-Services) they provide. Use and connexion with other reliable open source libraries such as GDAL, GEOS, MapServer, GRASS GIS, CGAL will also be reviewed. Examples of concrete applications will finally be shown in order to illustrate how ZOO-Project components (ZOO-Kernel, ZOO-Services, ZOO-API and ZOO-Client) can be used together as a platform to build standard compliant advanced geospatial applications. Along with the new 1.5 release, this talk will also present how ZOO-Project is being developed, extended and maintained in the context of the EU funded PublicaMundi research project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Taking dynamic web mapping to 1:100000 scale

CartoDB is growing to be one of the biggest mapping platform for the masses, being powered by a fully open-source stack, with PostgreSQL, PostGIS, Mapnik and Leaflet at its core. Our aim is to democratize map and geographical data visualization, making it easy for non-GIS people to create simple maps using the CartoDB Editor, but still keeping all the power and flexibility of the underlying components available to advanced users, with a variety of building blocks ranging from the frontend with CartoDB.js and Torque to the backend with the Map, SQL and Import API, parts of what we call the CartoDB Platform. Serving dozens of millions of map tiles daily has its own set of problems, but when they are being created by hundreds of thousands of users (which have their own database and can alter everything from styling, to the data sources and the SQL queries applied) everything turns out to be a big source of challenges, both development and operationally speaking. This talk will go through our general architecture, some of the decisions we’ve had to take, the things we’ve learned and the problems we’ve had to tackle through the way of getting CartoDB to scale at our level of growth, and how we're giving back to the community what we've discovered though the process.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Earning Your Support Instead of Buying it: A How-to Guide to Open Source Assistance

More organisations are moving to use FOSS4G software to cover shrinking budgets. It is very appealing to an organization’s leaders to ditch their current proprietary software solution with the attendant saving on per user licences and ongoing maintenance costs. Obviously, if you switched to FOSS4G to get better features and scalability you should consider buying a support contract from one of the many vendors that offer them, these companies support many of the core developers directly. This way you get all the advantages of open source, prompt support and often the chance to ask for new features. However, if you (or your boss) are looking to save money then you are moving from a cash economy to a gift economy. In a gift culture you need to build up your “capital” before attempting to take too much out. For example, you’ve downloaded the software and installed it, and all looks good. Then disaster hits, you have a demo for the CIO and nothing's working; Time to hit the user list, the developer list, stack exchange. Why can’t you get an answer? Remember just because your issue is urgent to you the developers might be in the middle of a new release or adding a new feature and have more important (or fun) things to do with their time. They will notice they have never seen your name before on the list, or on Stack Exchange that you have a reputation in the single digits – thus you are a newbie. There’s no harm in that but wouldn’t it be better to have got that out of the way before your emergency. You could have built up your reputation by asking some questions earlier especially questions like “what can I do to help?” or “I found an unclear paragraph in the install instructions, how do I fix it for you?” on a mailing list. On StackExchange you can build reputation by asking good questions and by answering other people’s questions. Once you’ve banked some capital there are still good and bad ways of asking a question. Developers are busy people (the GeoTools users list has 20-30 messages a day for example) no one has time to read all of them closely. If you use a poor subject (e.g. "Help!!!!") or don’t provide a clear description of the problem (e.g. “it crashes”) then the odds of being ignored are huge. It can be tempting once you have found a helpful developer to keep emailing them directly, but this is likely to lead a polite(ish) reminder to keep to the list so that everyone can benefit or silence. This talk will show how to be a better open source citizen and get a better answer than RTFM when your project is stuck and the demo is the next day. The author will share his experience with helping users and developers on the GeoTools and GeoServer mailing lists and as a moderator on gis.stackexchange.com.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Building OpenLayers Applications with QGIS

OpenLayers 3 is a powerful mapping library that can be used to create interactive mapping applications. Although it has a simple, intuitive and well-documented API, it requires knowledge of JavaScript to use, and no tools exist to leverage its functionality for more general GIS users. This presentation introduces an open-source QGIS plugin that creates web applications based on OL3, without the need of writing code manually. Elements of the web app are defined using a simple GUI, and QGIS GUI elements are used as well to define its characteristics (for instance, for defining the styling of layers or the extent of the view). The plugin can create different types of web apps, from simple maps used to browse data layers, to rich ones with GIS-like functionality, as well as others such as narrative maps. Apart from being an interface for writing OL3 code in a graphical way, it automates data deployment, and can import data into a PostGIS database or upload layers to a GeoServer instance. Altogether, these capabilities, along with QGIS data management functionality, allow to create a web app from QGIS in a very short time, as well as modifying or improving it later.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

MapCache: Fast and Featureful tile serving from the MapServer project

MapCache is a tiling server component designed to be efficient while still comprising all the features expected from a modern tiling solution. This presentation will give a brief presentation of the MapCache tiling solution, along with the recent developments that were added to reply to the needs of large scale installations (cache replication, load balancing, failsafe/fallback operations, large cache management, etc...)
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

WPS Benchmarking Session

The yearly Web Processing Service (WPS) benchmark. Variuos WPS implementations will be tested regarding their capabilities, compliancy to the standard and performance. Traditionally, each participating project designates individuals from their community to participate in this talk to introduce their project and summarize its key features. The focus this year will be on compliancy and interoperability. We will present the test set-up, participating WPS projects and the results of the benchmark.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Gis Server with Golang.

GIS Server architecture with Golang. Find the better way of Golang GIS Server.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:04 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

How can the students get Geospatial Information and make a map by using the FOSS4G.

We propose one of the practical case that the students are able to handle Geospatial Information and to make a map by using the FOSS4G. In recent years, the informatization of education is progressing in Japan. Its aim is to distribute one information device per one child in 2020 by informatization of education. However, it is not easy to implement the information device as the educational method. It is the same situation with respect to geographic information technology for education. From such a background, we founded the NPO in order to help the school by using a geographic information technology in 2011. We have carried out some of technical workshops for teachers, development of GIS teaching materials, and the provision of curriculum. Especially it is important to use geographic information technologies in geographical and historical education. In the classroom of geography and history, students can understand with realistic by using the GIS teaching materials. Therefore, we provide the teaching materials created by GIS for teachers or students. GIS can develop the teaching materials to maximize the imagination of students. Mainly, we have been using QGIS in the development of teaching materials. The KML file is an output from QGIS. The method is to provide database system in web by KML file materials. The name is OpenTextMap. The FOSS4G have been effective in this activity. Our goal in this talk is to share the educational practice by FOSS4G to other people.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)