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22:56 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Analyzing Fire Department Response with PostGIS

Local government fire departments always face scrutiny of their performance and efficiency. They are continuously asked to do a better job with fewer resources. In this highly technical session we will show how PostGIS is being used to analyze and measure performance throughout the city and plan for future resource requirements. Every city we work with is unique in some way. Some fire departments act as the local ambulance service while other cities contract with private ambulance companies. Emergency “911” response centers are often managed by police/law enforcement departments but not always! Many cities also have “mutual aid” agreements with neighboring cities to assist them when needed. For our customers PostGIS stores and manages the geo-located events (fires, hazardous spills, etc.) and provides details about the departments and individual emergency vehicle performance. It is most interestingly used to create statistical reports about things such as “Effecive Response Force” and “Resource Drawdown”, which are used to measure the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. Please come to learn how PostGIS is used to analyze things such as primary response areas and fire hazard severity zones, allowing our customers to ask more advanced, geographically based questions.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Semantic assessment and monitoring of crowdsourced geographic information

Whilst opensource software allows for the transparent collection of crowdsourced geographic information, in order for this material to be of value it is crucial that it be trusted. A semantic assessment of a feature’s attributes against ontologies representative of features likely to reside in this location provides an indication of how likely it is that the information submitted actually represents what is on the ground. This trust rating can then be incorporated into provenance information to provide users of the dataset an indication of each feature’s likely accuracy. Further to this, querying of provenance information can identify the features with the highest/lowest trust rating at a point in time. This presentation uses crowdsourced data detailing the location of fruit trees as a case study to demonstrate these concepts. Submissions of such crowdsourced information – by way of, say, an OpenLayers frontend – allow for the collection of both coordinate and attribute data. The location data indicates the relevant ontologies – able to be developed in Protégé – that describe the fruit trees likely to be encountered. If the fruit name associate with a submitted feature is not found in this area (e.g. a coconut tree in Alaska) then, by way of this model, the feature is determined to be inaccurate and given a low trust rating. Note that the model does not deem the information wrong or erase it, simply unlikely to be correct and deemed to be of questionable trust. The process continues by comparing submitted attribute data with the information describing the type of fruit tree – such as height – that is contained in the relevant ontologies. After this assessment of how well the submitted feature “fits” with its location the assigned trust rating is added to the feature’s provenance information via a semantic provenance model (akin to the W3C’s OPM). Use of such semantic web technologies then allows for querying to identify lower quality (less trustworthy) features and the reasons for their uncertainty (whether it be an issue with collection – such as not enough attribute data being recorded; time since collection – given degradation of data quality over time, i.e. older features are likely less accurate than newer ones; or because of a major event that could physically alter/remove the actual element, like a storm or earthquake). The tendency for crowdsourced datasets to be continually updated and amended means they are effectively dynamic when compared to more traditional datasets that are generally fixed to a set period/point in time. This requires them to be easily updated; however, it is important that efforts are directed at identifying and strengthening the features which represent the weakest links in the dataset. This is achievable through the use of opensource software and methods detailed in this presentation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Image Geocoding as a Service

Driven by the ambition of a global geocoding solution, in this paper we present the architecture of an image geocoding service. It takes advantage of the ubiquity of cameras, that are present in almost all smartphones. It is an inexpensive sensor yet powerful, that can be used to provide precise location and orientation. This geocoding service provides an API similar to existing ones for place names and addresses, like Google Geocoding API. Instead of a text based query, images can be submitted to estimate the location and orientation of the user. Developers can use this new API, keeping almost all the existing code already used for other geocoding APIs. Behind the scenes, image features are extracted from the submitted photograph, and compared against a huge database of georeferenced models. These models were constructed using structure from motion (SFM) techniques, and heavily reduced to a representative set of all information using Synthetic Views. Our preliminary results shows that the pose estimation of the majority of the images submitted to our geocoding was successfully computed (more than 60%) with the mean positional error around 2 meters. With this service, an inexpensive outdoor/indoor location service can be provided, for example, for urban environments, where GPS fails.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Magical PostGIS in three brief movements

Everyone knows you can query a bounding box or even spatially join tables in PostGIS, but what about more advanced magic? This short symphony of PostGIS examples will look at using advanced features of PostGIS and PostgreSQL to accomplish surprising results: * Using full text search to build a spatially interactive web form. * Using raster functionality to look into the future. * Using standard PostgreSQL features to track and visualize versioning in data. PostGIS is a powerful tool on it's own, but combined with the features of PostgreSQL, it is almost magical.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Advanced Security with GeoServer and GeoFence

The presentation will provide an introduction to GeoServer own authentication and authorization subsystems. We’ll cover the supported authentication protocols, such as from basic/digest authentication and CAS support, check through the various identity providers, such as local config files, database tables and LDAP servers, and how it’s possible to combine the various bits in a single comprehensive authentication tool, as well as providing examples of custom authentication plugins for GeoServer, integrating it in a home grown security architecture. We’ll then move on to authorization, describing the GeoServer pluggable authorization mechanism and comparing it with proxy based solution, and check the built in service and data security system, reviewing its benefits and limitations. Finally we’ll explore the advanced authentication provider, GeoFence, explore the levels on integration with GeoSErver, from the simple and seamless direct integration to the more sophisticated external setup, and see how it can provide GeoServer with complex authorization rules over data and OGC services, taking into account the current user, OGC request and requested layers to enforce spatial filters and alphanumeric filters, attribute selection as well as cropping raster data to areas of interest.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OSGeo and LocationTech Comparison

We have two great organizations supporting our Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial: The Open Source Geospatial Foundation and LocationTech. Putting on events like FOSS4G is primary responsibility of these software foundations - supporting our great open source software is! This talk will introduce OSGeo and LocationTech, and balance the tricky topic of comparison for those interested in what each organisation offers. We will also look at areas where these organizations are collaboration and explore possibilities for future work. Each of these software foundations support for their existing projects, ranging from "release parties" such as OSGeo Live or the Eclipse Annual Release. We are also interested in the ��incubation�� process each provides to onboard new projects. Review of the incubation provides an insight into an organization's priorities. This talks draws the incubation experience of: * GeoServer (OSGeo), GeoTools (OSGeo), * GeoGig (LocationTech), uDig (LocationTech) If you are an open source developer interested in joining a foundation we will cover some of the resource, marking and infrastructure benefits that may be a factor for consideration. We will also looking into some of the long term benefits a software foundation provides both you and importantly users of your software. If you are a team members faced with the difficult choice of selecting open source technologies this talk can help. We can learn a lot about the risks associated with open source based on how each foundation seeks to protect you. The factors a software foundation considers for its projects provide useful criteria you can use to evaluate any projects.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
18:37 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Satellite Snow Cover Products Evaluation and Validation Platform Developed Entirely With Floss Software

The monitoring of snow cover extent is important for the management of natural resource, extreme events prediction such as snowmelt floods, avalanches etc. The current status is that the network of weather stations is too sparse in regions with seasonal snow cover to provide reliable snow monitoring and impact applications. Remote sensing can regularly provide maps of snow cover extent, under limitations imposed by satellite cycles or cloud cover. A number of daily or synthesis snow cover extent products, covering Romania, with different resolutions and specifications, are available for free (e.g. GLOBSNOW, CryoLand, H-SAF, IMS). These products were homogenized and included, along with reference and in-situ data, into an application that make possible for user to inspect, process, analyze and validate the information, using a web based interface. The platform, created by National Meteorological Administration of Romania offers services based on Open Geospatial Consortium standards for data retrieval (WMS, WCS, WFS) and server-side processing (WPS, WCPS). The services were built upon open source solutions such as GeoServer, OpenLayers, GeoExt, PostgreSQL, GDAL, rasdaman. The application is composed of several software modules/services. The modules are split into two categories: server-side modules/services and client side modules - responsible for interaction with the user. A typical usage scenario assumes the following steps: 1. The user is operating the client functionality to select a temporal and spatial slice from a product cube (e.g. 5 months archive of daily CryoLand FSC data); 2. The users select a statistic method to be applied; 3. The request is sent to the server side processing applications wrapped as WPS or WCPS calls; 4. The process will trim/slice the coverage cube, perform the statistic operation for the pixels within the ROI for each day in the selected time interval; 5. The results are sent back encoded in a standard file format; 6. The web client display the results in a relevant form.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoServer for Spatio-temporal Data Handling With Examples For MetOc And Remote Sensing

This presentation will provide detailed information on how to ingest and configure SpatioTemporal in GeoServer to be served using OGC services, with examples from WMS and WCS services. Topics covered are as follows: * Discussion over existing data formats and how to preprocess them for best serving with GeoServer * Configuring SpatioTemporal raster and vector data in GeoServer * Serving SpatioTemporal raster and vector data with OGC Services Tips and techniques to optimize performance and allow maximum exploitation of the available data The attendees will be provided with the basic knowledge needed to preprocess and ingest the most common spatiotemporal data from the MetOc and Remote Sensing field for serving via GeoServer.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Use case of a dual open strategy in the canton of Zurich/Switzerland

With a dual 'open'-strategy the department of geoinformation at the canton of Zurich/Switzerland opts for a strategic orientation towards open source and open data: Open in the sense of an open web-mapping- infrastructure based on open source components: Mapfish Appserver was developed as a framework for building web map applications using OGC standards and the Mapfish REST protocol. It is freely available under the new BSD-license (http://mapfish-appserver.github.io/). The Ruby on Rails gem comes with the following out-of-the box features: - Organize maps by topics, categories, organisational units, keywords and more - Combine maps with background and overlay topics with adjustable opacity - Import UMN Mapserver mapfiles to publish new topics within seconds - Fully customizable legends and feature infos - Creation of complex custom searches - Rich digitizing and editing functionality - Role-based access control on topic, layer and attribute level - Access control for WMS and WFS - Rich library of ExtJS 4 based map components - Multiple customizable viewers from minimal mobile viewer to full featured portal - Multi-site support - Built-in administration backend - Self-organized user groups maps.zh.ch, the official geodata-viewer of the canton of Zurich, was developed using Mapfish Appserver. It contains more than 100 thematic maps and is considered an indispensable working tool for everyone working with spatial data in the canton of Z?rich/Switzerland. 'Open' in the sense of Open Government Data: Zurich is the first canton participating in the national open data portal opendata.admin.ch. The portal has the function of a central, national directory of open data from different backgrounds and themes. This makes it easier to find and use appropriate data for further projects. The department of geoinformatics aims to open as many geo-datasets as possible for the public by publishing them on the national OGD-portal. The open geodata is issued in form of web services ? Web Map Services (WMS), WebFeature Services (WFS) and Web Coverage Services (WCS) - and contains a wide range of geodata from the fields of nature conservation, forestry, engineering, infrastructure planning, statistics to high resolution LIDAR-data.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:40 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Mapping in GeoServer with SLD and CSS

Various software can style maps and generate a proper SLD document for OGC compliant WMS like GeoServer to use. However, in most occasions, the styling allowed by the graphical tools is pretty limited and not good enough to achieve good looking, readable and efficient cartographic output. For those that like to write their own styles CSS also represents a nice alternatives thanks to its compact-ness and expressiveness. Several topics will be covered, providing examples in both SLD and CSS for each, including: mastering multi-scale styling, using GeoServer extensions to build common hatch patterns, line styling beyond the basics, such as cased lines, controlling symbols along a line and the way they repeat, leveraging TTF symbol fonts and SVGs to generate good looking point thematic maps, using the full power of GeoServer label lay-outing tools to build pleasant, informative maps on both point, polygon and line layers, including adding road plates around labels, leverage the labelling subsystem conflict resolution engine to avoid overlaps in stand alone point symbology, blending charts into a map, dynamically transform data during rendering to get more explicative maps without the need to pre-process a large amount of views. The presentation aims to provide the attendees with enough information to master SLD/CSS documents and most of GeoServer extensions to generate appealing, informative, readable maps that can be quickly rendered on screen.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:14 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Open Source for Handling IndoorGML

In order to respond to increasing demand for indoor spatial information, an OGC standard called IndoorGML, has been recently published. It is an application schema of GML and based on the cellular space model, which represents an indoor space as a set of cells with their geometric, topological, and semantic attributes. Since we are at a beginning stage, very few tools supporting IndoorGML have been developed. In our talk, we will present an open source tool that we have been developing to provide a translating function between IndoorGML and other data formats. For example, it offers a Java package with a set of classes for indoorGML, called JavaIndoorGML. Once IndoorGML documents are mapped to Java instances of classes in JavaIndorGML, we are able to handle indoor spatial information with ease.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OpenDroneMap, Next Steps: Toward optimization and better 3D modeling

OpenDroneMap is an open source toolkit for processing drone imagery. From raw imagery input, it outputs a georeferenced pointcloud, mesh, and orthophoto. This is a powerful toolkit to change unreferenced arbitrary images into geographic data. Next steps in the project are needed to improve optimization of underlying algorithms, steps to better create meshes / textured meshes from the resultant pointclouds by explicitly modeling surfaces, and to make better output data from lower quality inputs. Come and see where the project is at, how the state of the art is advancing, and how you can use it and contribute.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Leaflet vs. OpenLayers: which is best for our indoor maps?

Leaflet and OpenLayers are two well-known javascript libraries for embedding interactive maps in a web page, and each of them comes with pros and cons which are not obvious. Having worked with both libraries for indoor applications, we will in this presentation offer insight on which of them is more suited to a variety of situations and requirements, and which challenges they should overcome in the future.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

MapWindow Plug-in of GRM Model Using Open Source Software

This presentation shows the processes and methods for developing distributed rainfall-runoff modeling system using open source softwares. The objective of this study is to develop a MapWindow plug-in for running GRM (Grid based Rainfall-runoff Model) model (MW-GRM) in open source GIS software environment. MW-GRM consists of the GRM model, physically based rainfall-runoff model developed by Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT), for runoff simulation, pre and post processing tools for temporal and spatial data processing, and auto-calibration process. Each component is integrated in the modeling software (MW-GRM), and can be run by selecting the MW-GRM menus. In developing MW-GRM, free software and open source softwares are used. GRM model was developed by using Visual Basic .NET included in Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 express, pre and post processing tools were developed by using MapWindow (Daniel, 2006) and GDAL (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library), and PEST (John, 2010) model was used in the auto-calibration process. The modeling system (MW-GRM) was developed as MapWindow plug-in. System environment was Window 7 64bit. MapWindow GIS ActiveX control and libraries were used to manipulate geographic data and set up GRM input parameters. ESRI ASCII and GeoTIFF raster data formats, supported by MapWindow and GDAL, were applied and shape file (ESRI, 1997) was used in vector data processing. GDAL is a library for translating vector and raster geospatial data. In this study, GDAL execution files were used to develop pre and post processing tools. The tools include data format conversion, spatial interpolation, clipping, and resampling functions for one or more raster layers. PEST is a model-independent parameter estimation software. Parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis can be carried out using PEST for model calibration and sensitive analysis. PEST is developed as an open source software, and single and parallel execution files are provided. This study developed GRM uncertainty analysis GUI as an interface system of GRM and PEST. GRM model had been a DLL type library including APIs to support developing another application. But PEST needs a model execution file, which can run in console execution window without user intervention. This study developed GRM execution file (GRMMP.exe) running in console window. It can simulate runoff using GRM project file, and no user intervention is allowed after the simulation has started. GRM uncertainty analysis GUI makes PEST input files (pcf, pif, ptf, rmf, etc.) by setting GRM parameters, observed data, PEST parameters, and selecting single or parallel PEST and PEST run automatically using GRMMP.exe file. In this study, all the functions necessary to develop GRM modeling system and pre and post processing tools could be implemented by using open source software. And MapWindow plug-in of GRM model can simulate runoff in open GIS environment including automatic model calibration using PEST. The study results can contribute to the wide spread of physically based rainfall-runoff modeling. And this study can present useful information in developing distributed runoff modeling system using open source software.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
13:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Open Source and Open Data for Smart Cities in Developing Countries: African Perspective

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
15:09 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

An open source GIS application for scientific national park management

This presentation introduces application cases of open source GIS for scientific national park management in Korea. Korea National Park Service (KNPS) is a public organization that manages almost all domestic national parks. GIS is a core technology for the park management, but the cost of commercial software had been limited the diffusion of GIS. Now, park rangers of KNPS are using QGIS that is a representative open source geospatial software, and they make themselves various GIS and remote sensing-based maps. For this, KNPS launched a QGIS education program for employee training. As a result, they started making maps using QGIS and many useful plugins, including Animove for QGIS, Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP), and Oceancolor Data Downloader. A variety of natural resources maps can be made from GPS field data, and time-series satellite images can be processed into climate change effect maps such as forest health, sea surface temperature (SST). Moreover, a graphical modeler feature of QGIS enables an automatic data processing. The Drone Flight Simulator called Park Air System, is also being developed using open source geospatial libraries. Using QGIS, KNPS makes all geospatial data like a trail, facility, and natural resources and is opening to the public freely. KNPS won the President's Prize in 2014 for the hard work.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Dynamic analysis, reporting and visualization of metadata catalogue

More and more geospatial resources (datasets, services, maps, ...) are described in metadata catalogs. Now, users need to be able to get an overview of the resources available (eg. data quality, dissemination formats) for evaluating their data policies. This could be achieve with tools for analyzing and reporting on large sets of information and dynamically compute reports and build dashboards. This presentation will show how to collect information from CSW catalogs, compute reports and indicators and build and publish online dashboards using Solr and banana opensource projects. This will be illustrated by the INSPIRE Directive monitoring in Europe and the MedSea project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Use case of Disaster Management System by using Geopaparazzi and MapGuide Open Source

In recent years, large-scale disasters have occurred in the countries of Asia including Japan, rapid collection and sharing of disaster information is required in order to provide relief and support speedy restoration of civic services. This presentation discusses the integration and customization of FOSS4G field survey tools and Web GIS server to facilitate aggregation and rapid sharing of disaster related field information. Further, the system also provide realtime interaction between field party and coordination team. A case study of practical use of the system at the Osaka Water General Service (OWGS) Corporation will be demonstrated to present the salient features of the system. The main capability of the system usability is normal as well as disaster situation will be highlighted.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Big data analysis with Tile Reduce and Turf.js

Tile Reduce is a new open source map reduce frame work for analyzing massive geo data. Tile reduce is a tile analysis framework built on the javascript GIS library Turf.js. It runs on your local computer or in the AWS cloud and scales to run thousands of processors in parallel. At Mapbox we use Tile Reduce to detect issues in global street vector data like OpenStreetMap, data comparison and data conflation. This talk will walk through the architecture of Tile Reduce, highlight advantages, limitations and future developments.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Dynamic dashboards with D3.js and CartoDB

NextGIS has been busy working on a new stack of geospatial software for the past few years and we're finally ready to present what we've accomplished. Our stack consists of 4 major components: web (NextGIS Web), mobile (NextGIS Mobile), desktop (NextGIS QGIS) and data management (NextGIS Manager). Three of those components are brand new, developed by NextGIS alone and were released just recently. For the fourth component, we participate in QGIS development since 2008 and use its codebase for our desktop component. The main focus of the stack is tight integration, ease of use and modularity. New stack features unique features, to name just the few: plugable renderers for NextGIS Web, multi-layer support for NextGIS Mobile, super-fast rendering and great formats support for NextGIS Manager and all-around integration with NextGIS QGIS. The presentation will provide an overview and will look at general architecture, use cases and plans for future development.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:03:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

FOSS4G Seoul 2015 - panel discussion

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Don't Copy Data! Instead, Share it at Web-Scale

Since its start in 2006, Amazon Web Services has grown to over 40 different services. Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), our object store, and one of our first services, is now home to trillions of objects and core to many enterprise applications. S3 is used to store many kinds of data, including geo, genomic, and video data and facilitates parallel access to big data. Netflix considers S3 the source of truth for all its data warehousing.The goal of this presentation is to illustrate best practice for open or shared geo-data in the cloud. To do so, it showcases a simple map tiling architecture, running on top of data stored in S3 and uses CloudFront (CDN), Elastic Beanstalk (Application Management), and EC2 (Compute) in combination with FOSS4G tools. The demo uses the USDA��s NAIP dataset (48TB), plus other higher resolution city data, to show how you can build global mapping services without pre-rendering tiles. Because the GeoTIFFs are stored in a requester-pays S3 bucket, anyone with an AWS account has immediate access to the source GeoTIFFs at the infrastructure level, allowing for parallel access by other systems and if necessary, bulk export. However, I will show that the cloud, because it supports both highly available and flexible compute, makes it unnecessary to move data, pointing to a new paradigm, made possible by cloud computing, where one set of GeoTIFFs can act as an authoritative source for any number of users.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoPackage and how open source is changing the way governments think about standards

Government is a great sector in which to use geospatial technology to solve problems at scale. This geospatial technology typically has varying degrees of quality and cost as you would expect in any market. Combine the two with the fact that the ecosystem of systems, large and small, is very diverse, creating varying challenges. With this in mind, governments are now realizing how their decisions impact their future capabilities. In this talk, we will discuss GeoPackage, an OGC encoding standard and the challenges it was created to solve. We were encountering a problem with how data was being created, disseminated, and used. With the rise of mobile computing devices raster images in various native formats were being disseminated to a wider audience to use and visualize information. These raster images were typically enormous and uncompressed in some cases and compressed but painfully slow in other cases. Computing resource availability varied across computing environments. Some end users were converting these large raster images to more friendly or optimized formats to do their daily jobs. This leads to massive data reprocessing efforts across many different areas, all of which are mostly avoidable if the source would simply produce relevant, fast-performing data in a format that satisfies the broadest audience. Many vendors have tried to solve this problem with their own custom or proprietary solutions. Full stack vendor solutions come with hefty price tags in the form of licenses, support contracts, or sometimes both. These solutions can and often do solve the immediate problem however they have side effects that reach far beyond the immediate. Vendor-specific technology islands therefore appear, beholden to a certain proprietary implementation simply because it would be too expensive or too involved to do otherwise. Proprietary data created for one system did not necessarily work in another system. Tools needed to be created, re-created, or modified to handle formats that did not work on their target platform. Data interoperability between geospatial groups is the first casualty. Glue code is then created to bridge the gap between the offending incompatible data and the desired data format of the new end-user. Government entities are quickly realizing that this makes no sense. Extra processing causes bottlenecks in downstream workflows and can quickly cause untenable requirements in areas like disaster recovery. Incompatibility in data makes it even harder to share crucial information between government organizations and non-government organizations alike. It is with these types of open standards that governments can maintain the control of their data creation and management. GeoPackage was created to free data from the constrictions of proprietary formats and is already paying dividends to government groups. Current GeoPackage development tools will be discussed as well as how early adopters are leveraging this new data specification and subsequent tools to push geospatial products to the end user.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
29:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Geopaparazzi, state of the art

Geopaparazzi is an application for fast field surveys. Its simplicity and the possibility to use it on as good as any android smartphone makes it a trusty field companion for engineers and geologists, but also for tourists who wish to keep a geodiary and any user that needs to be aware of his position even in offline mode. In Geopaparazzi it is possible to create text, picture and sketch notes and place them on the map. Notes can also be complex and form based in order to standardize surveys in which many people need to be coordinated. In the last years the support for the visualization of spatialite vector layers and recently also editing possibilities for spatialite poligonal datasets has been added, allowing for some simple-yet-powerfull possibilities on vector data. Desktop tools are supplied to bring datasets from the GIS environment to Geopaparazzi and back. The presentation will focus on the most important features of Geopaparazzi as well as the latest additions to the application in order to give a complete idea of the state of the art of the project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

DigitalGlobe and Open Source

Adding some important and pertinent information to this abstract with respect to the recent tragic events in Nepal. DigitalGlobe, in responding to the devastating earthquake in Nepal, has openly licensed both pre-event and post-event imagery, as well as openly licensed the results of our Tomnod campaign, which has crowdsourced information from nearly 50,000 volunteer contributors to assess damage and displaced people in Nepal. DigitalGlobe is working with first responders, aid relief and NGOs including Kathmandu Living Labs, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team, the UN, IFRC and American Red Cross. We are providing important information to disperse relief to the growing number of displaced people. The work we have done has been featured by CNN, CCTV, Mashable, the Atlantic and many more. Please reference links below. This is a poignant example of how Geospatial data, provided in the open can benefit millions of people who need help. http://www.cnn.com/videos/business/2015/05/01/wbt-intv-lake-bullock-nepal-digitalglobe.cnn http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/05/the-mapmakers-helping-nepal/392228/ http://www.citylab.com/tech/2015/04/how-amateur-mappers-are-helping-recovery-efforts-in-nepal/391703/ http://mashable.com/2015/05/06/landslide-nepal-photos-before-after/#:eyJzIjoidCIsImkiOiJfdTVjdzgyb2M5aGRnMnZ1bCJ9 Original abstract: DigitalGlobe operates a constellation of high resolution, high accuracy satellites. Imagery from DigitalGlobe can be seen in Mapbox Satellite, CartoDB, Google Maps, HERE Maps, Bing Maps, Apple Maps and is often used for the purposes of contributing, editing and validating for OpenStreetMap. Over the years, DigitalGlobe has provided both imagery and software processing tools with an Open Source license. This includes post-event imagery for Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines and the Japanese Tsunami. Recently, we open sourced a software toolkit called "Mr Geo" http://defensesystems.com/articles/2015/01/14/nga-open-sources-geospatial-analysis-tool.aspx This presentation will give an overview of DigitalGlobe, our geospatial technology and our services we are providing to the Open Source community.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

ngeo: a companion library for OpenLayers 3

ngeo is an open-source JavaScript library that aims to ease the development of web GIS applications based on AngularJS and OpenLayers 3. More specifically, ngeo provides Angular components, namely "services" and "directives", that can be combined together in different ways, based on the need of the application. This talk is a general presentation of ngeo. We will present some of the features provided by the library, through concrete examples. We will also present the design choices we have made, and why we have made this design choices. AngularJS, as a very popular framework, has received (severe) criticism lately. We will report on our experience with AngularJS, discuss its "good parts", and how we mitigate its "bad parts". With ngeo we define ? what we think ? is a good way to use AngularJS. ngeo, for example, includes guidelines for application developers, which have turned out to be key for the development of robust and high-performance applications. This talk is for anyone interested in AngularJS and OpenLayers 3. Come to this talk if you're interested to know how we use ngeo to develop applications combining AngularJS and OpenLayers 3.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:14 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Cadasta: Securing Property Rights with Open-Source

Much of the world currently does not have secure property and land tenure rights. Communities and individuals need low-cost tools to enable them to advocate for themselves. The Cadasta Foundation is building an open-source platform to securely enable these groups to document their land rights. This talk will review the design decisions taken into account, the technology underlying Cadasta, and the future road map. Individuals interested in land rights management and/or the challenges in implementing technology in difficult environments will be especially interested in this presentation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:08 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Presentation of GNOSIS SDK: High performance 3D visualization SDK and GIS software

An introduction and demonstration of the capabilities of the GNOSIS SDK ( http://ecere.ca/gnosis ), high performance 3D geospatial visualization software built atop our open-source Ecere Software Development Kit ( http://ecere.org ). The GNOSIS SDK offers a cross-platform object-oriented API for visualizing geospatial raster imagery, vector data and elevation models in both 3D and cartographic projections. It also features GNOSIS Cartographer, a GIS software allowing to import, visualize, edit, tile, optimize, style and analyze geospatial data. Vector shapefiles, GeoTIFF imagery and ASCII Grid heightmaps are readily supported, while a plug-in system allows to extend support and functionality through additional programming. Through tiling and resampling all supported types of data (raster, vector and elevation) at multiple scales, GNOSIS can handle large planetary scale data sets (up to 1 mm resolution) with consistent performance. Elevation data models, including high resolution point clouds, can drive the terrain rendering system which performs dynamic mesh optimization based on elevation variation. All types of map data can also be draped on top of the terrain, and styles can be modified in real-time. Styling can be applied with cascading style sheets based on the values of associated data records. GNOSIS also supports geo-referencing and rendering 3D models. GNOSIS also provides a map client / server architecture through its own highly efficient protocol, while it will also support serving and accessing data through widely used protocols such as WFS and WMS. Although the GNOSIS SDK itself is currently not open-source, we hope to be in a position to release it under an open-source license in the future and possibly apply for it to become an OSGeo software project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Modifications to Web Processing Service Standard For Client-Side Geoprocessing

Nowadays we see the rapid growth of solutions number for spatial data processing in the Web (i.e. geoprocessing). One of the main trends of Web geotechnologies evolution is the transition from Web map applications to the Web GIS applications, which are supplement the maps delivery with the analytic tools providing to the end user through Web interface. The only general open standard describes implementation rules for Web geoprocessing services. This is the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Processing Service standard (OGC WPS), which is server-oriented standard [Schut at al., 2007]. Moreover, the vast majority of currently used solutions (both open source and proprietary) are server-oriented, i.e. assume the using for computations the server resources only. However, some researchers underline that it is possible way to transmit the executable code to the client for client-side computations and geoprocessing [Keens at al., 2007]. Also, some general Web architecture concepts assumes the effectiveness of client-side computations, e.g. Fog Computing concept [Hong at al., 2013]. Our practical experience also shows that in some cases it is useful to have ability of client-side geoprocessing, which is not opposite but complement technology to the server-side processing technologies. In addition, we believe that it is more useful to have the ability to run the same processing tool by choice on server or client side. We name such double-sided services as Hybrid Geoprocessing Web Services (HGWS) [Panidi, 2014]. We study and discuss the approaches to fill the gap of client-side geoprocessing general schema. For this purpose, we implemented previously the getProcess request as addition to the WPS protocol [Panidi, 2014]. Additionally at the previous steps of our study, we proposed a possible structure of getProcess request and draft XML schema for its response, which describes the list of executable resources and their dependencies [Kazakov at al., 2015]. Currently we working on detailed methodology of processing tools implementation, and prototypes testing in use cases of geospatial data processing for small-scale research projects. We use the Python programming language as primary development tool, because of its applicability to build both server- and client-side processing tools using single core program code. We use Python also for implementation of needed infrastructure components, such as HGWS server that supports the getProcess request/response performing, and client-side runtime environment that provides executable code orchestration on the client. Achieved results need to be discussed widely and carefully. However, main conclusion of our current work is that client-side geoprocessing schema in general could be relatively simple and compatible backward with current standards. The HGWS concept is applicable when implementing client-side geoprocessing Web services in small-scale projects and could be the entering point for study of distributed geoprocessing systems implementation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Landmark Based Path Planning with a Linear Map Display For Mobile Map Applications

Landmarks are yet to be integrated with mainstream mobile phone based navigation aids. In geographical regions where land marks are commonly used by the community for navigation support, the lack of them in electronic navigation aids make them less useful for such communities. In this study a land marks based navigation model is derived considering the value of them for local community in Sri Lanka. The landmarks can be prominent or not, make sense only during certain time of the day or been important differently for people with different age groups. We assume that the attributes of landmarks can be used to give a strength value for them for navigation. In this study three parameters, the visibility of them at different time of the day, the horizontal spread of the landmark and the height of them are considered as attributes which gives strength to a landmark. First, to give more importance to landmarks, we have developed an algorithm where not only the distance of a route but the strength of landmarks is also considered when selecting the best route to navigate. The A* Algorithm is used as the base which output possible shortest paths considering only the distance. This algorithm was enhanced to output the optimum paths considering both the distance and the strength of landmarks along it. If the route is having more strength related to landmarks, it is prioritized. The route��s strength is defined based on number of landmarks visible along it and the strength of them. In order to calculate the number of landmarks along a route a landmark buffer is used. The day/night visibility and the height/spread are used to calculate the strength of the landmarks along the route. We have identified that after placing landmarks on a mobile screen which have limited size, the map become too congested and it becomes difficult to read the navigation path. This is more prominent when the path is having many turns. Therefore, secondly, to utilize the limited mobile screen in more effective manner, we reduce the selected path to a linear map which shows the path reducing curves but emphasising the turns by markers. The linear map shows landmarks around significant turns and provides guidance based on landmarks. The turn confirmations are calculated based on landmarks. Douglas-Peucker algorithm is used to derive the linear path and is enhanced to identify turns and show the landmarks around those turns. A prototype implementation is done using mobile web approach to reduce the platform dependency. In the simple mobile web application developed, jQuery mobile, and php are used for the user interface development and server side implementations respectively. PostgreSQL with postGIS capabilities and pgRouting is used as a spatial database. Web services and smart queries are used to implement the basic functionality communicating with the spatial database and the front end. The application is still being implemented and tested in Sri Lanka at the moment and the outcome would be reported in due course.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Mobmap as a visualization platform for spatio-temporal data

Mobmap is a visualization platform for spatio-temporal data easily and simply. This next generation GIS tools is released as a Google Chrome application for anyone. Recently, location data tend to be available to the public. This origin starts with the spread of iot devices including smartphone and open data such as aerial photos or satellite imageries. However, time series data analysis and visualisation on map tend to be unsupported by general gis software and libraries. Mobmap enables users to deal with time series location data. This presentation shows the summary and demos of Mobmap using several data examples such as simulated people flow data from geo tagged tweets and estimated building age transition data from multi temporal aerial photos, estimated future population.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
27:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Accelerating GeoSpatial Data Analytics With Pivotal Greenplum Database

As a typical big data application, geospatial analysis nowadays has been receiving extensive attention from both academic and industrial domains. Along collecting massive geospatial data, more and more manufacturers as well as research institutions find that the analysis over geospatial data in existing legacy architecture cannot be scalable. The reason is typical two-fold. On one hand, extending traditional databases to support modern complex geospatial data analytics is rather challenging. On the other hand, integrating the emerging techniques in other big data applications to traditional databases may suffer from compatibility issue, resulting in the poor performance or even painful debugging tasks. Specifically, most of today��s general-purpose relational databases (e.g., Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, together with their geospatial components) are particularly designed as OLTP systems. Their shared-disk or shared-everything architectures are especially optimized for high-throughput transaction execution while sacrificing analytical query performance. In contrast to the exiting relational database systems, Pivotal offers the Greenplum Database (GPDB), which is an extensible relational database platform that uses a shared-nothing, massive parallel processing (MPP) based architecture to vastly accelerate the online analytical processing (OLAP) over geospatial big data. Even better, GPDB can seamlessly integrate in-database analytical processing with our extended analytics stacks, such as heterogeneous Hadoop environments and in-memory data grid. Recent reports from Gartner highly scored Pivotal GPDB on data warehousing and analytics. We design and develop geospatial analytics toolkits on GPDB in terms of three aspects. First, we migrate the latest PostGIS project into GPDB so that GPDB is able to run as a spatial database system for regular GIS users. Second, we extend the spatial component with various types of advanced geospatial functions, such as geospatial group-by, similarity search and network-constrained scenarios. Third, we are making effort to support associable retrievals of data across geospatial and other data domains, i.e, queries involving in both geospatial information as well as other non-spatial information, like RDF (which is known as GeoSPARQL queries), Text (which is known as spatial keyword search), time (which is known as trajectory search) etc. Above all we aim to integrate full breath of big data developers on geospatial analytics. This talk will briefly introduce (1) the architecture of Pivotal GPDB that provides automatic high-performance parallelization of geospatial data loading and data processing, (2) GPDB��s extensive and growing library of in-database geospatial analytic functions, and (3) the capability to build up a comprehensive geospatial data analytics platform around Pivotal GPDB. I will provide examples of how data science teams may transform billions of geo-tagged customer records to tackle the real-world problem of identity resolution in one minute. I will also discuss our plan of making Pivotal Greenplum Database open-source in the coming quarters.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:23 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

New opensource geospatial software stack from NextGIS

NextGIS has been busy working on a new stack of geospatial software for the past few years and we're finally ready to present what we've accomplished. Our stack consists of 4 major components: web (NextGIS Web), mobile (NextGIS Mobile), desktop (NextGIS QGIS) and data management (NextGIS Manager). Three of those components are brand new, developed by NextGIS alone and were released just recently. For the fourth component, we participate in QGIS development since 2008 and use its codebase for our desktop component. The main focus of the stack is tight integration, ease of use and modularity. New stack features unique features, to name just the few: plugable renderers for NextGIS Web, multi-layer support for NextGIS Mobile, super-fast rendering and great formats support for NextGIS Manager and all-around integration with NextGIS QGIS. The presentation will provide an overview and will look at general architecture, use cases and plans for future development.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
13:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

The development of a geospatial creating system for National Spatial Data Infrastructure.

Recently, awareness and utilization of open source software has been increased, and interest of open source in spatial information industry has also been increased. Especially, in developing countries trying to build National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), movement to utilize open source technology is significant because it costs less for maintenance and it is easy to operate. The purpose of this research is to leave a case creating web-based platform environment to apply to the countries attempting to build real National Spatial Data infrastructure by developing and applying open source. In order to implement this, the user interface and services using OpenLayers, jquery, and Ajax were developed.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Stuffing your vector tiles full of data

Mapbox-style vector tiles are all the rage, but what if you want to put a lot more data into them than most people? Norway is a nice country with very detailed maps. When your roads are polygons, your fjords are award-winning in their complexity and individual flagpoles, drains and hedgerows have been added to the map, you have a bit higher data density than the average vector tile user. We wanted to see what would happen when you put all of that into a format that most people use for OpenStreetMap-style data. Join us for tales of zoom levels, bounding box woes, selective exports, tile size limits, generalisation choices and generation times that might just provide useful information for your future adventures with vector tiles!
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Automatic Improvement of Point-of-Interest Tags For Openstreetmap Data

Geo-search engines and location-based services allow to query for points-of-interest (POIs) in a certain region or next to the current user location. Hereby, search queries often ask for classes ('hotels New York', 'supermarket Berlin', 'Italian restaurant London') rather than single points ('Hotel Belvedere New York'). In OpenStreetMap (OSM), one can specify the basic class along with every POI e.g. via the amenity tag (amenity=fast food), via direct tags (shop=supermarket) or several other specialized tags, as the cuisine tag for restaurants. These tags are mandatory for a certain POI to show up among the search results for a class-based query. Moreover they are useful to categorize search results, e.g. searching for 'Venice beach' should inform the user that there are beaches, hotels, fitness studios and clothing stores with that name. Unfortunately in OSM, there are plenty of POIs where the class is not provided. But many of those POIs exhibit a name tag ('Sunset Hotel', 'Wal Mart') which already contains some information about the respective class. In this paper, we investigate methods for automatic extrapolation of class, amenity and specialized tags solely based on POI names. For example, 'Pizzaria Bella Italia' most certainly indicates an Italian restaurant while 'Tapas Bar' indicates Spanish food. We use machine learning tools to extract for many amenities typical words and phrases that occur in associated name tags and learn respective POI classifiers. For example, learning indicators for 'shop=hairdresser' on German OSM tags led to high scores for 'fris', 'cut', hair' and 'haar'. While 'studio' and 'design' also appeared in many name tags, they are not suitable to distiguish between 'shop=hairdresser' and 'shop=beauty' with the latter including nail spas. For other kinds of POIs as supermarkets or gas stations, names of large chains ('ALDI', 'Aral') showed up as typical indicators. We empirically prove that with the help of our learned classifiers, tags for POIs with unknown class can be extrapolated with high accuracy. For example, amongst all hairdressers 8% were untagged but could be identified by our approach.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)