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25:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

istSOS: latest developments and first steps into the OSGeo incubation process

istSOS (http://istsos.org) is an OGC SOS server implementation entirely written in Python. istSOS allows for managing and dispatching observations from monitoring sensors according to the Sensor Observation Service standard. istSOS is released under the GPL License, and should run on all major platforms (Windows, Linux, Mac OS X). The presentation will go through the details of all the new features that will be packed in the next release. In particular the presenters will introduce enhancements that include the Advanced Procedures Status Page and the istSOS Alerts & Web Notification Service. The istSOS Advanced Procedures Status Page is a new section of the Web graphical user Interface, offering at a glance a graphically representation of the Sensor Network health. Administrators can easily figure out common issues related with sensor data acquisition and transmission errors. The istSOS Alert & Web Notification Service are the result of the Google Summer of Code 2014 outputs. This service is a REST implementation that take inspiration from the OGC Web Notification Service (OGC, 2003; OGC, 2006a) and the Sensor Alert Service (OGC, 2006b) which currently are OpenGIS Best Practices. Alerts are triggered by customized conditions on sensor observations and can be dispatched through emails or social networks. This year istSOS is entering into the OSGeo incubation process, this new challenge will permit to enhance the software quality and consolidate the project management procedures. The presenters will present the incubation status and discuss about the next steps.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Semantic assessment and monitoring of crowdsourced geographic information

Whilst opensource software allows for the transparent collection of crowdsourced geographic information, in order for this material to be of value it is crucial that it be trusted. A semantic assessment of a feature’s attributes against ontologies representative of features likely to reside in this location provides an indication of how likely it is that the information submitted actually represents what is on the ground. This trust rating can then be incorporated into provenance information to provide users of the dataset an indication of each feature’s likely accuracy. Further to this, querying of provenance information can identify the features with the highest/lowest trust rating at a point in time. This presentation uses crowdsourced data detailing the location of fruit trees as a case study to demonstrate these concepts. Submissions of such crowdsourced information – by way of, say, an OpenLayers frontend – allow for the collection of both coordinate and attribute data. The location data indicates the relevant ontologies – able to be developed in Protégé – that describe the fruit trees likely to be encountered. If the fruit name associate with a submitted feature is not found in this area (e.g. a coconut tree in Alaska) then, by way of this model, the feature is determined to be inaccurate and given a low trust rating. Note that the model does not deem the information wrong or erase it, simply unlikely to be correct and deemed to be of questionable trust. The process continues by comparing submitted attribute data with the information describing the type of fruit tree – such as height – that is contained in the relevant ontologies. After this assessment of how well the submitted feature “fits” with its location the assigned trust rating is added to the feature’s provenance information via a semantic provenance model (akin to the W3C’s OPM). Use of such semantic web technologies then allows for querying to identify lower quality (less trustworthy) features and the reasons for their uncertainty (whether it be an issue with collection – such as not enough attribute data being recorded; time since collection – given degradation of data quality over time, i.e. older features are likely less accurate than newer ones; or because of a major event that could physically alter/remove the actual element, like a storm or earthquake). The tendency for crowdsourced datasets to be continually updated and amended means they are effectively dynamic when compared to more traditional datasets that are generally fixed to a set period/point in time. This requires them to be easily updated; however, it is important that efforts are directed at identifying and strengthening the features which represent the weakest links in the dataset. This is achievable through the use of opensource software and methods detailed in this presentation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Image Geocoding as a Service

Driven by the ambition of a global geocoding solution, in this paper we present the architecture of an image geocoding service. It takes advantage of the ubiquity of cameras, that are present in almost all smartphones. It is an inexpensive sensor yet powerful, that can be used to provide precise location and orientation. This geocoding service provides an API similar to existing ones for place names and addresses, like Google Geocoding API. Instead of a text based query, images can be submitted to estimate the location and orientation of the user. Developers can use this new API, keeping almost all the existing code already used for other geocoding APIs. Behind the scenes, image features are extracted from the submitted photograph, and compared against a huge database of georeferenced models. These models were constructed using structure from motion (SFM) techniques, and heavily reduced to a representative set of all information using Synthetic Views. Our preliminary results shows that the pose estimation of the majority of the images submitted to our geocoding was successfully computed (more than 60%) with the mean positional error around 2 meters. With this service, an inexpensive outdoor/indoor location service can be provided, for example, for urban environments, where GPS fails.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Magical PostGIS in three brief movements

Everyone knows you can query a bounding box or even spatially join tables in PostGIS, but what about more advanced magic? This short symphony of PostGIS examples will look at using advanced features of PostGIS and PostgreSQL to accomplish surprising results: * Using full text search to build a spatially interactive web form. * Using raster functionality to look into the future. * Using standard PostgreSQL features to track and visualize versioning in data. PostGIS is a powerful tool on it's own, but combined with the features of PostgreSQL, it is almost magical.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Intelligent SDIs with MapMint 2.0

This conference aims at presenting the status of the MapMint open source project and its upcoming 2.0 version. The upgrade to newer versions of its core open source components will first be explained. The extensive use of OGC standards through ZOO-Project 1.5, GDAL 1.11 and MapServer 7 is indeed making MapMint an even more stable and efficient foundation to build an open source and standard-compliant spatial data infrastructure. The new metadata related functionalities being developed in interaction with PyCSW and CKAN will also be presented along with the assets of the CSW standard support. The new MapMint responsive user interfaces based on OpenLayers 3 and Bootstrap will also be presented. Both code and documentation improvements will also be detailed. The newly added functionalities in MapMint 2.0 will finally be explained from the developer and user point of views, based on case studies and live examples.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:45 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Building and integrating a Continuous-Integration system within your open source project

So you have an open source project or you want to create a new one. Maybe you have worked on a development project in the past that didn’t have quite the amount of rigor you would have liked. You know you want a build system for your project that is easy to administer, cheap, and powerful, but where do you start? Here is how we implemented our own process using free open source tools. We learned from experience that developers are more focused on solving problems than perceived “housekeeping” tasks. We needed tools that would automate the mundane, repeatable, mechanical, or human-difficult tasks so that developers could focus on what they are good at. We needed a single-sign on through Github to lower any barriers to tool usage that might exist. We needed a dead-simple way to determine if our commits broke functionality anywhere else in code. We needed to track how much of our code was covered by unit tests. Finally, we needed to be able to quickly and easily review each-other’s code and provide feedback. We decided on TravisCI to handle build duties in Maven with a nested project structure and also for its integration with Coveralls. For bug tracking, release scheduling, and task management, we chose WaffleIO for its tight integration with Github issues. One additional feature we desired was static analysis so that simple errors that lie outside of a linter could be caught and reported. This was handled by a combination of Coverity scans and a static analysis tool for Eclipse called Findbugs. Due to our platform support and third-party library (GDAL) requirement, the Github Wiki was the perfect place to keep all setup documents and other helpful articles for end-users and project new-comers. This system for software development worked quite well in most cases. Builds were automated, moderately tested (~40-60% coverage), and complaining to the team loudly via email when things broke. We had a new problem though: build breakages in the master branch and the inability to share code that was not yet fully functional. To alleviate this, we started using the branching and merging functionality that makes Git so valuable. Now, no direct commits occur to the master branch unless in very special circumstances. A developer will see the TravisCI build results before the merge ever occurs, allowing them to adjust code or test cases *before* they cause failures. As a side effect, the merge request workflow allows the team to perform code reviews quickly and easily. Finally, any CI system is not without challenges. Building a continuous integration system has upfront costs that should not be ignored. The payoff from those costs, however, is code/product quality and the avoidance of technical debt. Lastly, some of these CI tools lack support for private repositories.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:13 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Advanced Security with GeoServer and GeoFence

The presentation will provide an introduction to GeoServer own authentication and authorization subsystems. We’ll cover the supported authentication protocols, such as from basic/digest authentication and CAS support, check through the various identity providers, such as local config files, database tables and LDAP servers, and how it’s possible to combine the various bits in a single comprehensive authentication tool, as well as providing examples of custom authentication plugins for GeoServer, integrating it in a home grown security architecture. We’ll then move on to authorization, describing the GeoServer pluggable authorization mechanism and comparing it with proxy based solution, and check the built in service and data security system, reviewing its benefits and limitations. Finally we’ll explore the advanced authentication provider, GeoFence, explore the levels on integration with GeoSErver, from the simple and seamless direct integration to the more sophisticated external setup, and see how it can provide GeoServer with complex authorization rules over data and OGC services, taking into account the current user, OGC request and requested layers to enforce spatial filters and alphanumeric filters, attribute selection as well as cropping raster data to areas of interest.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
32:27 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Towards GeoExt 3 – Supporting both OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 6

GeoExt (http://geoext.github.io/geoext2/) is Open Source and enables building desktop-like GIS applications through the web. It is a JavaScript framework that combines the GIS functionality of OpenLayers with the user interface savvy, rich data-package and architectural concepts of the ExtJS library provided by Sencha. Version 2.1 of GeoExt (currently in alpha-status) is the successor to the GeoExt 1.x-series and brought support for ExtJS 5 and is built atop the following installments of its base libraries: OpenLayers 2.13.1 and ExtJS 5.1.0 (or ExtJS 4.2.1 at your choice). The next version of GeoExt (v3.0.0?) will support OpenLayers 3 and the new and shiny ExtJS 6 (not finally released at the time of this writing). The talk will focus on the following aspects: * Introduction into GeoExt * New features in OpenLayers 3 and ExtJS 6 and how they can be used in GeoExt * The road towards GeoExt 3 * Results of the planned Code Sprint in June (see https://github.com/geoext/geoext3/wiki/GeoExt-3-Codesprint) * Remaining tasks and outlook The new features of OpenLayers (e.g. WebGL-support, rotated views, smaller build sizes, etc.) and Ext JS 6 (Unified code base for mobile and desktop while providing all functionality of ExtJS 5) and the description of the current state of this next major release will be highlighted in the talk. Online version of the presentation: http://marcjansen.github.io/foss4g-2015/Towards-GeoExt-3-Supporting-both-OpenLayers-3-and-ExtJS-6.html#/
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
31:05 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

OSGeo and LocationTech Comparison

We have two great organizations supporting our Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial: The Open Source Geospatial Foundation and LocationTech. Putting on events like FOSS4G is primary responsibility of these software foundations - supporting our great open source software is! This talk will introduce OSGeo and LocationTech, and balance the tricky topic of comparison for those interested in what each organisation offers. We will also look at areas where these organizations are collaboration and explore possibilities for future work. Each of these software foundations support for their existing projects, ranging from "release parties" such as OSGeo Live or the Eclipse Annual Release. We are also interested in the ��incubation�� process each provides to onboard new projects. Review of the incubation provides an insight into an organization's priorities. This talks draws the incubation experience of: * GeoServer (OSGeo), GeoTools (OSGeo), * GeoGig (LocationTech), uDig (LocationTech) If you are an open source developer interested in joining a foundation we will cover some of the resource, marking and infrastructure benefits that may be a factor for consideration. We will also looking into some of the long term benefits a software foundation provides both you and importantly users of your software. If you are a team members faced with the difficult choice of selecting open source technologies this talk can help. We can learn a lot about the risks associated with open source based on how each foundation seeks to protect you. The factors a software foundation considers for its projects provide useful criteria you can use to evaluate any projects.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoServer for Spatio-temporal Data Handling With Examples For MetOc And Remote Sensing

This presentation will provide detailed information on how to ingest and configure SpatioTemporal in GeoServer to be served using OGC services, with examples from WMS and WCS services. Topics covered are as follows: * Discussion over existing data formats and how to preprocess them for best serving with GeoServer * Configuring SpatioTemporal raster and vector data in GeoServer * Serving SpatioTemporal raster and vector data with OGC Services Tips and techniques to optimize performance and allow maximum exploitation of the available data The attendees will be provided with the basic knowledge needed to preprocess and ingest the most common spatiotemporal data from the MetOc and Remote Sensing field for serving via GeoServer.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Raster Data In GeoServer And GeoTools: Achievements, Issues And Future Developments

The purpose of this presentation is, on a side, to dissect the developments performed during last year as far as raster data support in GeoTools and GeoServer is concerned, while on the other side to introduce and discuss the future development directions. Advancements and improvements for the management of multidimensional raster data (NetCDF, GRIB, HDF) and mosaic thereof will be introduced, as well as the available ways to manage sliding windows of data via the REST API and importer. Extensive details will be provided on the latest updates for the management of multidimensional raster data used in the Remote Sensing and MetOc fields, including support for WCS EO and WMS EO, and some considerations on the WCS MetOc extensions. The presentation will also introduce and provide updates on jai-ext, imageio-ext, and JAITools. jai-ext provides extended JAI operators that correctly handle NODATA and regione of interests (masks), JAITools provides a number of new raster data analysis operators, including powerful and fast raster algebra support, while ImageIO-Ext bridges the gap across the Java world and native raster data access libraries providing high performance access to GDAL, Kakadu and other libraries. The presentation will wrap up providing an overview of unresolved issues and challenges that still need to be addressed, suggesting tips and workarounds allowing to leverage the full potential of the systems.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:48 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Sensor up your connected applications with OGC SensorThings API

This introduction will give an introduction and live demonstration of the OGC SensorThings API. The OGC SensorThings API provides an open and unified way to interconnect the Internet of Things (IoT) devices, data, and applications over the Web. The OGC SensorThings API is a new OGC standard candidate. Unlike many existing OGC standards, SensorThings API is very simple and efficient. At the same time, it is also comprehensive and designed to handle complex use cases. It builds on a rich set of proven-working and widely-adopted open standards, such as the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, including the ISO/OGC Observation and Measurement (O&M) and Sensor Observation Services (SOS). The main difference between the SensorThings API and the OGC SOS is that the SensorThings API is designed specifically for the resource-constrained IoT devices and the Web developer community. As a result, the SensorThings API follows the REST principles, the use of an efficient JSON encoding, and the use of the flexible OASIS OData protocol and URL conventions. In addition to introduce the specification, this talk will also demonstrate an end-to-end IoT application based on the SensorUp IoT platform, an open source implementation of the SensorThings API, including a server, javascript library, web dashboard and a Arduino library.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:57 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Route Planning in your Database with pgRouting

pgRouting extends the PostGIS / PostgreSQL geospatial database to provide shortest path search and other network analysis functionality. This presentation will show the inside and current state of the pgRouting development, from its wide range of shortest path search algorithms to driving distance calculation or Traveling Sales Person (TSP) optimization. Additionally we will give a brief outlook and introduction of upcoming new features like the Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) solver, and what we have in mind for future releases. We will explain the shortest path search in real road networks and how the data structure is important to get better routing results. Furthermore we will show how you can improve the quality of the search with dynamic costs and make the result look closer to the reality. You will also learn about difficulties and limitations of the library, and when pgRouting might not be not the right tool to solve your routing problem.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:20 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Map publishing with or without programming skills

This presentation will showcase the use of Oskari (http://oskari.org/oskari) in publishing embedded map applications. The typical use case doesn't require any programming skills. You only need to select the map layers and tools that will be available in the application. After that, you can customize the user interface (size, colors, tool layout etc.). As a result the publishing tool will give you a HTML-snippet to embed to any web site. The supported web services are WMS, WMTS, WFS and Esri REST. If your data is not readily available through a web service, you can import data. Shapefiles, KML, GPX and MID/MIF-files are supported. There's an extensive selection of tools at your disposal: index map, centering to user��s location, address and place name search, attribute table (for vector data) to name a few. Integrating the map application with the surrounding web page makes more advanced use cases possible. All you need is a few lines of JavaScript to use the RPC interface (http://www.oskari.org/documentation/bundles/framework/rpc). With RPCs you can control the map application from the parent document and vice-versa. They can also exchange information. This enables you to develop highly interactive web applications with always up-to-date data. In the presentation an example application made using Oskari and D3 will be showcased.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
28:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

A spatial view in the culture heritage domain

Culture heritage institutions are hosting digital historic map collection and the collections more and more allow spatial-temporal searching and georeferencing of its maps. At the Saxon State and University Library Dresden (SLUB) this lead to the development of the Virtual Map Forum 2.0, which is a spatial data infrastructure (SDI) for searching, visualization and georeferencing plane survey sheets. This SDI mainly relies on OpenLayers 3, Mapserver, GeoNetwork and GDAL. Beside that, tools for automatic georeferencing based on image recognition software have been developed and compared with the use of crowdsourcing tools for georeferencing. A further topic, on which culture heritage institutions are focusing is enrichment, transformation and merging of existing heterogeneous metadata sets. The goal is to allow better searching and utilization approaches for digital and analog objects. In the SLUB this lead to the development of the open source ETL-tool d:swarm, which supports the transformation and enrichment of metadata records. This opens possibilities for adding spatial identifier to large amounts of library objects, like pictures, newspaper articles or books and through this allows for a greater consideration of the spatial dimension in discovery systems. Another big topic is long term preservation, which becomes even more important with the growing number of digital native publications and datasets. Libraries and archives as experts of long term preservation and spatial data infrastructure provider, which are confronted with tasks and questions regarding the preservation of content. They therefor can benefit from an exchange of knowledge and work between each other. The presentation will give an insight into the world of culture heritage institutions. It will present topics, where FOSS4G and libraries can benefit from each other. Therefore it discusses different issues from within the SLUB where FOSS4G is used or could be used and spatial issues are affected. The main topics are spatial-temporal searching and visualization, georeferencing, metadata enrichment and long-term preservation.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:59 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

ZOO-Project 1.5.0: News about the Open WPS Platform

ZOO-Project is an Open Source Implementation of the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) available under a MIT/X-11 style license and currently in incubation at OSGeo. ZOO-Project provides a WPS compliant developer-friendly framework to easily create and chain WPS Web services.This talk give a brief overview of the platform and summarize new capabilities and enhancement available in the 1.5.0 release. A brief introduction to WPS and a summary of the Open Source project history with its direct link with FOSS4G will be presented. An overview of the ZOO-Project will then serve to introduce new functionalities and concepts available in the 1.5.0 release and highlight their interests for applications developers and users. Evolutions and enhancements of the ZOO-Project WPS server (ZOO-Kernel) will first be detailed especially regarding compliancy (WPS 1.0.0 and 2.0), performance and scalability. The ZOO-Project optional support for Orfeo Toolbox and SAGA GIS will then be introduced, with details on the numerous new WPS Services (ZOO-Services) they provide. Use and connexion with other reliable open source libraries such as GDAL, GEOS, MapServer, GRASS GIS, CGAL will also be reviewed. Examples of concrete applications will finally be shown in order to illustrate how ZOO-Project components (ZOO-Kernel, ZOO-Services, ZOO-API and ZOO-Client) can be used together as a platform to build standard compliant advanced geospatial applications. Along with the new 1.5 release, this talk will also present how ZOO-Project is being developed, extended and maintained in the context of the EU funded PublicaMundi research project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:29 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Leaflet vs. OpenLayers: which is best for our indoor maps?

Leaflet and OpenLayers are two well-known javascript libraries for embedding interactive maps in a web page, and each of them comes with pros and cons which are not obvious. Having worked with both libraries for indoor applications, we will in this presentation offer insight on which of them is more suited to a variety of situations and requirements, and which challenges they should overcome in the future.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:51 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Taking dynamic web mapping to 1:100000 scale

CartoDB is growing to be one of the biggest mapping platform for the masses, being powered by a fully open-source stack, with PostgreSQL, PostGIS, Mapnik and Leaflet at its core. Our aim is to democratize map and geographical data visualization, making it easy for non-GIS people to create simple maps using the CartoDB Editor, but still keeping all the power and flexibility of the underlying components available to advanced users, with a variety of building blocks ranging from the frontend with CartoDB.js and Torque to the backend with the Map, SQL and Import API, parts of what we call the CartoDB Platform. Serving dozens of millions of map tiles daily has its own set of problems, but when they are being created by hundreds of thousands of users (which have their own database and can alter everything from styling, to the data sources and the SQL queries applied) everything turns out to be a big source of challenges, both development and operationally speaking. This talk will go through our general architecture, some of the decisions we’ve had to take, the things we’ve learned and the problems we’ve had to tackle through the way of getting CartoDB to scale at our level of growth, and how we're giving back to the community what we've discovered though the process.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:44 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Building OpenLayers Applications with QGIS

OpenLayers 3 is a powerful mapping library that can be used to create interactive mapping applications. Although it has a simple, intuitive and well-documented API, it requires knowledge of JavaScript to use, and no tools exist to leverage its functionality for more general GIS users. This presentation introduces an open-source QGIS plugin that creates web applications based on OL3, without the need of writing code manually. Elements of the web app are defined using a simple GUI, and QGIS GUI elements are used as well to define its characteristics (for instance, for defining the styling of layers or the extent of the view). The plugin can create different types of web apps, from simple maps used to browse data layers, to rich ones with GIS-like functionality, as well as others such as narrative maps. Apart from being an interface for writing OL3 code in a graphical way, it automates data deployment, and can import data into a PostGIS database or upload layers to a GeoServer instance. Altogether, these capabilities, along with QGIS data management functionality, allow to create a web app from QGIS in a very short time, as well as modifying or improving it later.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:17 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

MapWindow Plug-in of GRM Model Using Open Source Software

This presentation shows the processes and methods for developing distributed rainfall-runoff modeling system using open source softwares. The objective of this study is to develop a MapWindow plug-in for running GRM (Grid based Rainfall-runoff Model) model (MW-GRM) in open source GIS software environment. MW-GRM consists of the GRM model, physically based rainfall-runoff model developed by Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT), for runoff simulation, pre and post processing tools for temporal and spatial data processing, and auto-calibration process. Each component is integrated in the modeling software (MW-GRM), and can be run by selecting the MW-GRM menus. In developing MW-GRM, free software and open source softwares are used. GRM model was developed by using Visual Basic .NET included in Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 express, pre and post processing tools were developed by using MapWindow (Daniel, 2006) and GDAL (Geospatial Data Abstraction Library), and PEST (John, 2010) model was used in the auto-calibration process. The modeling system (MW-GRM) was developed as MapWindow plug-in. System environment was Window 7 64bit. MapWindow GIS ActiveX control and libraries were used to manipulate geographic data and set up GRM input parameters. ESRI ASCII and GeoTIFF raster data formats, supported by MapWindow and GDAL, were applied and shape file (ESRI, 1997) was used in vector data processing. GDAL is a library for translating vector and raster geospatial data. In this study, GDAL execution files were used to develop pre and post processing tools. The tools include data format conversion, spatial interpolation, clipping, and resampling functions for one or more raster layers. PEST is a model-independent parameter estimation software. Parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis can be carried out using PEST for model calibration and sensitive analysis. PEST is developed as an open source software, and single and parallel execution files are provided. This study developed GRM uncertainty analysis GUI as an interface system of GRM and PEST. GRM model had been a DLL type library including APIs to support developing another application. But PEST needs a model execution file, which can run in console execution window without user intervention. This study developed GRM execution file (GRMMP.exe) running in console window. It can simulate runoff using GRM project file, and no user intervention is allowed after the simulation has started. GRM uncertainty analysis GUI makes PEST input files (pcf, pif, ptf, rmf, etc.) by setting GRM parameters, observed data, PEST parameters, and selecting single or parallel PEST and PEST run automatically using GRMMP.exe file. In this study, all the functions necessary to develop GRM modeling system and pre and post processing tools could be implemented by using open source software. And MapWindow plug-in of GRM model can simulate runoff in open GIS environment including automatic model calibration using PEST. The study results can contribute to the wide spread of physically based rainfall-runoff modeling. And this study can present useful information in developing distributed runoff modeling system using open source software.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:12 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

MapCache: Fast and Featureful tile serving from the MapServer project

MapCache is a tiling server component designed to be efficient while still comprising all the features expected from a modern tiling solution. This presentation will give a brief presentation of the MapCache tiling solution, along with the recent developments that were added to reply to the needs of large scale installations (cache replication, load balancing, failsafe/fallback operations, large cache management, etc...)
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
19:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

WPS Benchmarking Session

The yearly Web Processing Service (WPS) benchmark. Variuos WPS implementations will be tested regarding their capabilities, compliancy to the standard and performance. Traditionally, each participating project designates individuals from their community to participate in this talk to introduce their project and summarize its key features. The focus this year will be on compliancy and interoperability. We will present the test set-up, participating WPS projects and the results of the benchmark.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
20:33 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Saving Rapid Urbanizing Cities using the FOSS4G Based Spatial Analysis for Urban Development

Early stages of urban developments such as housing construction, new town development and urban regeneration are performed through the spatial analysis using the topographic map, cadastral map, zoning map and other various kind of thematic maps for the proposed site analysis, feasibility analysis and evaluation of urban development alternatives. For these analyses, urban developers traditionally have used commercial software like ArcGIS to analyze these kinds of projects. And giant Korean public urban developer like Korea land and Housing Corporation (LH) has support these projects based on the in-house enterprise GIS system. But developing countries facing rapid urbanization near the peripheral areas of metropolitan region cannot handle such problems only using the commercial software. They need knowledge and experience about the urban development rather than complicated software based analysis techniques or large investments on the enterprise GIS system. In this sense, FOSS4G (Free Open Source Software for Geospatial) are very useful tools in that they are easy to learn, use and also relatively cheap to maintain. LH has accumulated a lot of urban development cases and wants to store this knowledge to FOSS4G based spatial analysis as a rule base. By doing so, it can manage the fast growing cities sustainable. In this presentation, we will show some conceived urban development project faced by the rapid urbanizing cities and suggest FOSS4G based spatial analysis method using the FOSS4G like QGIS plug-in.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:10 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GIS Policy Map for Local Government in Korea: Story of Dobong-gu, Seoul

Local governments in Korea are trying to solve urban problems using GIS policy map. Through FOSS4G Seoul, I want to introduce example of Dobong-gu, Seoul. Topic 1. Spatial Analysis of Practical Requirements of Parking Lot The residents who live in the old residential zone in Dobong-gu are suffering from shortage of parking spaces every morning and night. Most administrators are using an indicator named ‘a ratio of cars to parking spaces’ to judge seriousness of the problem with parking. But the indicator cannot reflect reality. We measured practical requirements of parking lot spatially, using micro block data and car registration data with addresses. We tried to look at things from the resident’s perspective, not from administrator or provider. Now, Dobong-gu push ahead with sharing parking lot program with houses which have spare parking spaces. Topic 2. Civic Participation Model for Solving Children’s School Walkway Safety Problems. Office of Policy Development of Dobong-gu did a survey with a thousand residents about safety issue, and many of them answered that they feel fear walking down the alley. Although the Office got the policy implication from survey, they couldn’t convince the definition of ‘alley’ and accurate location where the residents feel fear. Office and we redesigned survey paper cooperatively. The improvement point was ‘Map-based Survey’. Elementary school students and their parents participated and they lined school walkway and alleyways where they felt fear on paper map. We migrated all the lines on papers to shape files using QGIS, then we got a very satisfactory outcome. Office of Policy Development added LED lights to the dark street nearby elementary school, Elementary school teachers decided the walkway guidance spot by referring to students often jaywalk.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
22:50 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Push it through the wire! Push it more, if it's wireless!

Today's web browsers, their rendering engines and JavaScript interpreters are able to display relatively big amounts of vector data. Moving from DOM rendering (as it was implemented with help of SVG in for examples OpenLayers 2) to Canvas (and further to WebGL -- as we are now having in OpenLayers 3 or Leaflet) enables us to display thousands of complex vector features, with complicated on-client vector data styling. With this possibility, we are facing now new types problems: how to send such amount of data through limited internet connection? If we have closer look at the problem, we can see clearly, that old database paradigm has raised one more time: we can not have all three attributes of data in one pot, but only 2 of them: speed of the delivered data or amount of delivered data or their topicality. If we take this limits into account and decide to deal with big amounts of data in fast way, topicality must be sacrificed. In the talk, we will demonstrate some possible solutions for this problem, using tiled vectors, generalization, aggregation of vector data. Also advantages, disadvantages of various new and popular vector formats, such as GeoJSON, TopoJSON or MapBox will be discussed. Geometric data do not have be rendered all the time in all scales and over whole area of interest, but only necessary portion of them. If displayed in smaller scales, aggregation and generalisation can take place on the server side. That implies, that using vector caching mechanism could be considered as well. But if we need direct interaction of the server input with cached vector data, mechanism for this must be defined as well. Also attribute data have to be transfered separately, if all the optimisation was put in the vector geometries. Also possible steps between cached data and real-time data will be discussed.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
15:09 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

An open source GIS application for scientific national park management

This presentation introduces application cases of open source GIS for scientific national park management in Korea. Korea National Park Service (KNPS) is a public organization that manages almost all domestic national parks. GIS is a core technology for the park management, but the cost of commercial software had been limited the diffusion of GIS. Now, park rangers of KNPS are using QGIS that is a representative open source geospatial software, and they make themselves various GIS and remote sensing-based maps. For this, KNPS launched a QGIS education program for employee training. As a result, they started making maps using QGIS and many useful plugins, including Animove for QGIS, Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP), and Oceancolor Data Downloader. A variety of natural resources maps can be made from GPS field data, and time-series satellite images can be processed into climate change effect maps such as forest health, sea surface temperature (SST). Moreover, a graphical modeler feature of QGIS enables an automatic data processing. The Drone Flight Simulator called Park Air System, is also being developed using open source geospatial libraries. Using QGIS, KNPS makes all geospatial data like a trail, facility, and natural resources and is opening to the public freely. KNPS won the President's Prize in 2014 for the hard work.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:22 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Jsonix: Talking to OGC Web Services in JSON

Can you talk to OGC Web Services in JSON instead of XML? You can - with Jsonix, a powerful JavaScript tool for XML - JSON conversion. JSON has probably already replaced XML as a "lingua franca". JSON is much lighter and easier to use than XML, especially in JavaScript-based web apps. In the context of GIS, web mapping is dominated by JavaScript libraries like OpenLayers and Leaflet, which speak JSON natively. But what about the standards? Open Geospatial Consortium defines more than 50 specifications with more than 100 individual versions. Technically almost all of them are XML-based and defined by XML schemas. These are de jure and de facto standards, widely used and well supported. So you still need XML processing in JS web mapping apps. Processing XML is no rocket science, but it's seldom a pleasure to implement. The OL3 KML parser is about 2.5KLoc of dense XML parsing. Even a very simple WMS GetCapabilities format is almost 1 KLOC. From this code around 90% is pure XML parsing and only 10% is the processing of the payload. Would not it be nice if we could talk to the OGC Web Services directly in JSON? So that the developers could focus on the 10%, the payload processing, and cut off the 90% (XML handling) of the effort. Jsonix is an open source library for XML - JS conversion which makes it just possible. With Jsonix you can take an XML Schema and generate XML - JS mappings. These mappings allow you to parse XML in the original schema and get your data in pretty JSON. It also works in the opposite direction: you can serialize JSON in XML, which would correspond to the original XML Schema. What makes Jsonix unique is that it is type and structure-safe. On the JSON side, you will get types and structures exactly as they are defined in the original XML Schema. For instance, xs:decimal is converted into a number in number in JSON, repeatable elements are represented by arrays etc. You just need the corresponding mapping. You can generate Jsonix mappings on your own or use one of the pre-generated mappings. The (unofficial) OGC Schemas Project compiles and provides mappings for many of the popular OGC schemas (OWS, WMS, WFS, CSW, SLD and many more). This presentation gives an overview of Jsonix demonstrates its usage by a number of examples.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
16:07 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Dynamic analysis, reporting and visualization of metadata catalogue

More and more geospatial resources (datasets, services, maps, ...) are described in metadata catalogs. Now, users need to be able to get an overview of the resources available (eg. data quality, dissemination formats) for evaluating their data policies. This could be achieve with tools for analyzing and reporting on large sets of information and dynamically compute reports and build dashboards. This presentation will show how to collect information from CSW catalogs, compute reports and indicators and build and publish online dashboards using Solr and banana opensource projects. This will be illustrated by the INSPIRE Directive monitoring in Europe and the MedSea project.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:46 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

CourtVisionPH: A System for the Extraction of Field Goal Attempt Locations and Spatial Analysis of Shooting Using Broadcast Basketball Videos

The presentation is about the development and application of CourtVisionPH. CourtVisionPH is a system developed for the extraction, storage, and analysis of basketball-related spatial information. It focuses on the extraction of field goal attempt (FGA) locations from broadcast basketball videos and the spatial analysis of shooting by means of statistics and maps/visualizations. The system was developed using the Python Programming Language. It features a database for storing spatial and non-spatial information and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to help the user and the system interact. The modules used in the development include Tkinter for the GUI, SQLite for the database, Numpy for the computations, Pillow for image processing, and OpenCV for video rendering. The system has three independent but interconnected functionalities each with its own specific task: (1) Data Management which handles database connections, (2) Spatial Data Extraction for user-assisted extraction of FGA locations from videos using 2D-projective coordinate transformation and validation of transformed FGA locations sing RMSE and back-transformation, and (3) Spatial Analysis that computes statistics, generates maps/visualizations, and query-based analysis. After the development of the system, it was applied on UP Fighting Maroons and the DLSU Green Archers during the 2nd Round of University Athletics Association of the Philippines (UAAP) Season 76 (2013-2014). Videos publicly available online through youtube.com were used for extracting field goal attempt locations. Shots taken too far from the basket (half-court heaves, etc.) or those with bad RMSE or back-substitution results were excluded from the extraction. The extracted FGA locations were then validated using box-scores. Afterwhich, the system was used to analyze and compare the two teams and their players using statistics and visualizations and show that spatial analysis provides more information and allows for better characterization and appreciation of shooting than conventional, non-spatial techniques.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
26:49 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

PDAL: the Pointcloud Data Abstraction Library

An introduction to the PDAL pointcloud library, how to accomplish basic things, push data to plas,io, a webgl rendered and an introduction to GreyHound, the PDAL API. PDAL, GreyHound provide all the basic tools for pointcloud data translation and manipulation and hooks for various other projects to use the PDAL read/write engine (eg, PCL, Points2Grid)
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
17:18 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

FREEWAT: FREE and Open Source Tools For WATer Resource Management

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
23:26 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Big data analysis with Tile Reduce and Turf.js

Tile Reduce is a new open source map reduce frame work for analyzing massive geo data. Tile reduce is a tile analysis framework built on the javascript GIS library Turf.js. It runs on your local computer or in the AWS cloud and scales to run thousands of processors in parallel. At Mapbox we use Tile Reduce to detect issues in global street vector data like OpenStreetMap, data comparison and data conflation. This talk will walk through the architecture of Tile Reduce, highlight advantages, limitations and future developments.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
24:31 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Dynamic dashboards with D3.js and CartoDB

NextGIS has been busy working on a new stack of geospatial software for the past few years and we're finally ready to present what we've accomplished. Our stack consists of 4 major components: web (NextGIS Web), mobile (NextGIS Mobile), desktop (NextGIS QGIS) and data management (NextGIS Manager). Three of those components are brand new, developed by NextGIS alone and were released just recently. For the fourth component, we participate in QGIS development since 2008 and use its codebase for our desktop component. The main focus of the stack is tight integration, ease of use and modularity. New stack features unique features, to name just the few: plugable renderers for NextGIS Web, multi-layer support for NextGIS Mobile, super-fast rendering and great formats support for NextGIS Manager and all-around integration with NextGIS QGIS. The presentation will provide an overview and will look at general architecture, use cases and plans for future development.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
1:03:54 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

FOSS4G Seoul 2015 - panel discussion

  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
25:41 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

Don't Copy Data! Instead, Share it at Web-Scale

Since its start in 2006, Amazon Web Services has grown to over 40 different services. Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), our object store, and one of our first services, is now home to trillions of objects and core to many enterprise applications. S3 is used to store many kinds of data, including geo, genomic, and video data and facilitates parallel access to big data. Netflix considers S3 the source of truth for all its data warehousing.The goal of this presentation is to illustrate best practice for open or shared geo-data in the cloud. To do so, it showcases a simple map tiling architecture, running on top of data stored in S3 and uses CloudFront (CDN), Elastic Beanstalk (Application Management), and EC2 (Compute) in combination with FOSS4G tools. The demo uses the USDA��s NAIP dataset (48TB), plus other higher resolution city data, to show how you can build global mapping services without pre-rendering tiles. Because the GeoTIFFs are stored in a requester-pays S3 bucket, anyone with an AWS account has immediate access to the source GeoTIFFs at the infrastructure level, allowing for parallel access by other systems and if necessary, bulk export. However, I will show that the cloud, because it supports both highly available and flexible compute, makes it unnecessary to move data, pointing to a new paradigm, made possible by cloud computing, where one set of GeoTIFFs can act as an authoritative source for any number of users.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
21:00 FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) English 2015

GeoPackage and how open source is changing the way governments think about standards

Government is a great sector in which to use geospatial technology to solve problems at scale. This geospatial technology typically has varying degrees of quality and cost as you would expect in any market. Combine the two with the fact that the ecosystem of systems, large and small, is very diverse, creating varying challenges. With this in mind, governments are now realizing how their decisions impact their future capabilities. In this talk, we will discuss GeoPackage, an OGC encoding standard and the challenges it was created to solve. We were encountering a problem with how data was being created, disseminated, and used. With the rise of mobile computing devices raster images in various native formats were being disseminated to a wider audience to use and visualize information. These raster images were typically enormous and uncompressed in some cases and compressed but painfully slow in other cases. Computing resource availability varied across computing environments. Some end users were converting these large raster images to more friendly or optimized formats to do their daily jobs. This leads to massive data reprocessing efforts across many different areas, all of which are mostly avoidable if the source would simply produce relevant, fast-performing data in a format that satisfies the broadest audience. Many vendors have tried to solve this problem with their own custom or proprietary solutions. Full stack vendor solutions come with hefty price tags in the form of licenses, support contracts, or sometimes both. These solutions can and often do solve the immediate problem however they have side effects that reach far beyond the immediate. Vendor-specific technology islands therefore appear, beholden to a certain proprietary implementation simply because it would be too expensive or too involved to do otherwise. Proprietary data created for one system did not necessarily work in another system. Tools needed to be created, re-created, or modified to handle formats that did not work on their target platform. Data interoperability between geospatial groups is the first casualty. Glue code is then created to bridge the gap between the offending incompatible data and the desired data format of the new end-user. Government entities are quickly realizing that this makes no sense. Extra processing causes bottlenecks in downstream workflows and can quickly cause untenable requirements in areas like disaster recovery. Incompatibility in data makes it even harder to share crucial information between government organizations and non-government organizations alike. It is with these types of open standards that governments can maintain the control of their data creation and management. GeoPackage was created to free data from the constrictions of proprietary formats and is already paying dividends to government groups. Current GeoPackage development tools will be discussed as well as how early adopters are leveraging this new data specification and subsequent tools to push geospatial products to the end user.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: FOSS4G, Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo)
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.7.0 (943df4b4639bec127ddc6b93adb0c7d8d995f77c)