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1:07:34 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Manipulating Graphene at the Atomic Scale

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
1:00:07 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Graphene and hexa-BN Heterostructures

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
1:04:10 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Graphene based Electronics and Optoelectronics

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
1:18:31 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Electronic Properties of Bilayer Graphene, from High to Low Energies

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
1:18:00 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Raman Spectra of Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
51:23 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Chiral Electrons and Zero-Mode Anomalies in Graphene

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
54:08 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Recent Progress in Graphene Synthesis and Applications

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
1:01:25 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2011

Graphene Update

  • Published: 2011
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
49:44 EuroPython English 2014

Python's Role in Big Data Analytics: Past, Present, and Future

Travis Oliphant - Python's Role in Big Data Analytics: Past, Present, and Future Python has had a long history in Scientific Computing which means it has had the fundamental building blocks necessary for doing Data Analysis for many years. As a result, Python has long played a role in scientific problems with the largest data sets. Lately, it has also grown in traction as a tool for doing rapid Data Analysis. As a result, Python is the center of an emerging trend that is unifying traditional High Performance Computing with "Big Data" applications. In this talk I will discuss the features of Python and its popular libraries that have promoted its use in data analytics. I will also discuss the features that are still missing to enable Python to remain competitive and useful for data scientists and other domain experts. Finally, will describe open source projects that are currently occupying my attention which can assist in keeping Python relevant and even essential in Data Analytics for many years to come.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
1:22:46 EuroPython English 2014

EuroPython 2014: July 22, 2014 - Lightning Talks

Lightning Talks: Elliptics: Anton Tyurin, On Being Super: Austin Bingham, PYCON Finland: Mikko Ohtamaa, Regularities in language: Dmitrijs Milajevs, pip install pyladies: Lynn Root, Iktomi Forms: Harut Dagesyan, Killer Robots: Radomir Dopieralski, ZeroVM: Lars Butler, Zombies and Application Runtimes: Dmitry Jemerov, FritzConnection - Communicate with the AVM Fritz Box: Klaus Bremer, Argment Clinic: Larry Hastings, PEP 473: Adding structured data to builtin exceptions: Sebastian Kreft, Supporting Python 2 and Python 3 witth the same source code: Stefan Schwarzer, Birthday: Mark Shannon, nsupdate.info bepasty: Thomas Waldmann, Python Core Security: Christian Heimes, Hands On Unix: Rok Garbas, Deproulette: Joar Wandborg
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
1:16:08 EuroPython English 2014

EuroPython 2014: July 25, 2014 - Lightning Talks

Lightning Talks: Sparts - Quick service Prototyping: Manu, Blinky's Async Adventure: Petr Viktorin, Tryton Unconference Leipzig 2014: Udono, Yet another conference announcement: Baptiste Mispelon, Configurable omnipotent custom applications integrated network engine: Anton Tyurin, What we did at #ep14: "vtemian" Vlad Temian, Foreman client: Lukas Bednar, HSTS: Abraham Martin, PyAr Pablo G. Celayes, Celia Cintas, Python Quantum Platform: Yves J. Hilpisch, CodeWeek.eu: Erika Pogorelc, Our beautiful minds: Remco Wendt, Stackless - Best Ever: Christian Tismer, Stella: Compiling a small subset of Python: David Mohr, Plone Mosiac Sprint Barcelona: Philip Bauer
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
48:00 EuroPython English 2014

The Cython Compiler for Python

Stefan Behnel - The Cython Compiler for Python The Cython compiler is the most widely used static compiler for Python. It is used to speed up Python code and to extend CPython with fast native extension modules that process huge amounts of data all around the world. This talk by one of the core developers gives an intro to using the compiler and an overview of its major features. ----- The Cython compiler is the most widely used static compiler for Python. The code it generates is used in countless critical applications that process huge amounts of data world wide. Cython has two major use cases: to compile Python code into fast native extension modules, and to connect native code to the CPython runtime. The main goal of the Cython project is to make it easy for users to manually optimise their Python code to make it run at C speed. This talk by one of the core developers will give an intro to using the compiler and an overview of its major features. Outline will be more or less as follows: * Cython: intro to the project and the compiler (4 min.) * compiling Python code - how to do it and what you get (3 min.) - a tiny bit of distutils (2 min.) * static typing and Cython extensions to the Python language - static typing in Cython language syntax (3 min.) - static typing in pure Python syntax (2 min.) - why Cython's type system is cool and what users need to know about it (8 min.) - Cython for optimising Python code (5 min.) * quick intro: talking to native C/C++ code in Cython - using external C APIs (4 min.) - using external C++ APIs (3 min.) - how to build and link in distutils (2 min.) - notes on ways to wrap large C-APIs (1 min.) * quick overview: special features for high-performance code - NumPy integration and memory views, fused types, parallel loops in all brevity (3 min.)
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
48:27 EuroPython English 2014

Performance Python for Numerical Algorithms

Yves - Performance Python for Numerical Algorithms This talk is about several approaches to implement high performing numerical algorithms and applications in Python. It introduces into approaches like vectorization, multi-threading, parallelization (CPU/GPU), dynamic compiling, high throughput IO operations. The approach is a practical one in that every approach is illustrated by specific Python examples. The talk uses, among others, the following libraries: * NumPy * numexpr * IPython.Parallel * Numba * NumbaPro * PyTables
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
27:50 EuroPython English 2014

Twisted Names

Richard Wall - Twisted Names: DNS Building Blocks for Python Programmers In this talk I will report on my efforts to update the DNS components of Twisted and discuss some of the things I've learned along the way. I'll demonstrate the EDNS0, DNSSEC and DANE client support which I have been working on and show how these new Twisted Names components can be glued together to build novel DNS servers and clients. Twisted is an event-driven networking engine written in Python and licensed under the open source MIT license. It is a platform for developing internet applications.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
23:34 EuroPython English 2014

Jigna: a seamless Python-JS bridge to create rich HTML UIs for Python apps

Prashant Agrawal - Jigna: a seamless Python-JS bridge to create rich HTML UIs for Python apps Jigna aims to provide an easy way to create rich user interfaces for Python applications using web technologies like HTML, CSS and Javascript, as opposed to widget based toolkits like Qt/wx or native toolkits. It provides a seamless two-way data binding between the Python model and the HTML view by creating a Python-JS communication bridge. This ensures that the view is always live as it can automatically update itself when the model changes, and update the model when user actions take place on the UI. The Jigna view can be rendered in an in-process Qt widget or over the web in a browser.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
39:57 EuroPython English 2014

Support Python 2 and 3 with the same code

Stefan Schwarzer - Support Python 2 and 3 with the same code Your library supports only Python 2, - but your users keep nagging you about Python 3 support? As Python 3 gets adopted more and more, users ask for Python 3 support in existing libraries for Python 2. This talk mentions some approaches for giving users a Python 3 version, but will quickly focus on using the very same code for a Python 2 and a Python 3 version. This is much easier if you require Python 2.6 and up, and yet a bit easier if you require Python 3.3 as the minimum Python 3 version. The talk discusses main problems when supporting Python 3 (some are easily solved): * `print` is a function. * More Python APIs return iterators that used to return lists. * There's now a clear distinction between bytes and unicode (text) strings. * Files are opened as text by default, requiring an encoding to apply on reading and writing. The talk also explains some best practices: * Start with a good automatic test coverage. * Deal with many automatic conversions with a one-time 2to3 run. * Think about how your library should handle bytes and unicode strings. (Rule of thumb: Decode bytes as early as possible; encode unicode text as late as possible.) * Should you break compatibility with your existing Python 2 API? (Yes, if there's no other way to design a sane API for Python 2 and 3. If you do it, raise the first part of the version number.) * Try to keep code that's different for Python 2 and 3 minimal. Put code that needs to be different for Python 2 and 3 into a `compat` module. Or use third-party libraries like `six` or `future`. Finally, the talk will mention some helpful resources on the web.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
39:19 EuroPython English 2015

Why storing files for the web is not as straightforward as you might think.

Alessandro Molina - Why storing files for the web is not as straightforward as you might think. DEPOT is a file storage framework born from the experience on a project that saved a lot of files on disk, until the day it went online and the customer system engineering team decided to switch to Heroku, which doesn't support storing files on disk. The talk will cover the facets of a feature "saving files" which has always been considered straightforward but that can become complex in the era of cloud deployment and when infrastructure migration happens. After exposing the major drawbacks and issues that big projects might face on short and long terms with file storage the talk will introduce DEPOT and how it tried to solve most of the issues while providing a super-easy-to-use interface for developers. We will see how to use DEPOT to provide attachments on SQLAlchemy or MongoDB and how to handle problems like migration to a different storage backend and long term evolution. Like SQLAlchemy makes possible to switch your storage on the fly without touching code, DEPOT aims at making so possible for files and even use multiple different storages together.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
40:07 EuroPython English 2015

Solving the web most popular code shortening competition in Python.

Alessandro Amici - Solving the web most popular code shortening competition in Python. “Code shortening” is the “sport” where participants strive to achieve the shortest possible source code that solves a programming problem by exploiting all the tricks and quirks of the language. The [SIZECON on SPOJ] is one of the oldest and most popular code shortening problems on the web with a bizarre twist, only character above ASCII value 32 are counted for the penalty. During the talk we will take a journey into some frightening depths of the Python language in order to write shorter and shorter solutions to SIZECON until, exploiting a number of truly mind-blowing tricks, we will reach the current record solution of 28 characters (above ASCII 32!). I promise I’ll show you the most obfuscated, contrived and sick python code you have ever seen and (hopefully!) will ever see. I invite participants to give [SIZECON] a try and check their score against the [Python2] and [Python3] SPOJ rankings.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
24:50 EuroPython English 2015

Yak shaving a good place to eat using non negative matrix factorization

Adriano Petrich - Yak shaving a good place to eat using non negative matrix factorization Trying to find a good place to eat has become much easier and democratic with online reviews, but on the other hand, that creates new problems. Can you trust that 5 star review of fast food chain as much as the 1 star of a fancy restaurant because "Toast arrived far too early, and too thin"? We all like enjoy things differently. Starting of on the assumption that the "best pizza" is not the same for everyone. Can we group users into people that has similar tastes? Can we identify reviews and restaurants to make sense of it? Can that lead us to a better way to find restaurants that you like? Using some data handling techniques I walk you through my process and results that I've got from that idea. There are no requisites for this talk except basic python and math knowledge (matrices exist)
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
56:57 EuroPython English 2015

Python and PyPy performance (not) for dummies

Antonio Cuni - Python and PyPy performance (not) for dummies In this talk we would like to have a short introduction on how Python programs are compiled and executed, with a special attention towards just in time compilation done by PyPy. PyPy is the most advanced Python interpreter around and while it should generally just speed up your programs there is a wide range of performance that you can get out of PyPy, ranging from slightly faster than CPython to C speeds, depending on how you write your programs. We will split the talk in two parts. In the first part we will explain how things work and what can and what cannot be optimized as well as describe the basic heuristics of JIT compiler and optimizer. In the next part we will do a survey of existing tools for looking at performance of Python programs with specific focus on PyPy. As a result of this talk, an audience member should be better equipped with tools how to write new software and improve existing software with performance in mind. The talk will be given by Antonio Cuni and Maciej Fijalkowski, both long time PyPy core developers and expert in the area of Python performance.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
58:35 EuroPython English 2015

Writing Domain Specific Languages with Python

Daniel Pope - Writing Domain Specific Languages with Python Python is an expressive general purpose programming language. Its syntax provides many ways to represent structure and minimise code repetition and boilerplate. But Python not always expressible enough. Perhaps when you've built a complicated enough system with hard-to-express inter-relationships, the code required to construct or operate on it can become complicated, repetitive and unreadable. Or perhaps you have users unfamiliar with Python who need to understand or edit a system. In cases like these, stepping beyond the syntax and semantics of basic Python can be an advantage. Daniel will describe various ways you can implement your own Domain Specific Languages, languages perhaps completely unlike Python that can succinctly describe more complicated Python systems. This talk will cover: * What and why of DSLs * Metaprogramming tricks * Writing simple parsers * The libraries PLY and PyParsing * Building tooling around your new DSLs
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
38:17 EuroPython English 2015

RinohType, a document processor inspired by LaTeX

Brecht Machiels - RinohType, a document processor inspired by LaTeX RinohType is a document processor inspired by [LaTeX] and written in Python. It renders [reStructuredText] and [Sphinx] documents to PDF based on a document template and a style sheet. RinohType already implements many of the features that make LaTeX so great. Not stopping there, RinohType also tries to fix LaTeX's weaknesses; it should not only be easy to use, but easy to customize and extend as well. To minimize frustration when things go wrong, care is taken to provide descriptive warning and error messages. The powerful layout engine makes it easy to define custom page layouts. And the CSS- inspired stylesheets simplify the styling of document elements. At a lower level, Python makes the writing of extensions much more accessible when compared to TeX's rather arcane macro language. In the talk, I would like to introduce RinohType to the Python community. No special prerequisite knowledge is required. I will start off by discussing my motivation for starting RinohType development, its design goals and the currently available features. This will be followed by an example of how you can use RinohType to render a reStructuredText document to a neat PDF document, highlighting some of the features along the way. Next, we'll explore some of RinohType's internals such as the page layout engine and the style sheet system. We will explore how these can be used in a Python application to create a document from scratch. A first RinohType release was recently created. While this preview release is of alpha quality, it should be able to render most reStructuredText documents. It also includes a preliminary Sphinx builder. Please find more details in the package's description at [PyPI].
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
35:58 EuroPython English 2015

Data-visualisation with Python and Javascript: crafting a data-viz toolchain for the web

Kyran Dale - Data-visualisation with Python and Javascript: crafting a data-viz toolchain for the web To accompany an upcoming O'Reilly book 'Data-visualisation with Python and Javascript: crafting a dataviz toolchain for the web' this talk aims to sketch out the toolchain by transforming some dry Wikipedia data (Nobel prize-winners) into a far more engaging and insightful web-visualisation. This transformative cycle uses Python big-hitters such as Scrapy, Pandas and Flask, the latter delivering data to Javascript's D3. While Python is fast becoming the goto language for data- processing/science, the visual fruits of that labour hit the wall of the web, where there is only one first-class language, Javascript. To develop a data-viz toolchain for the modern world, where web- presentation is increasingly mandated, making Python and Javascript play nicely is fundamental. This talk aims to show that the perceived wall between the two languages is actually a thin, permeable membrane and that, with a bare minimum of web-dev, one can get on with programming seamlessly in both.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
38:01 EuroPython English 2015

Data Analysis and Map-Reduce with mongoDB and pymongo

Alexander Hendorf - Data Analysis and Map-Reduce with mongoDB and pymongo The MongoDB aggregation framework provides a means to calculate aggregated values without having to use map-reduce. While map-reduce is powerful, it is often more difficult than necessary for many simple aggregation tasks, such as totaling or averaging field values. See how to use the build-in data-aggregation-pipelines for averages, summation, grouping, reshaping. See how to work with documents, sub- documents, grouping by year, month, day, etc. This talk will give many (live) examples how to make the most of your data with pymongo with a few lines of code.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
36:08 EuroPython English 2015

12 years of Pylint

Claudiu Popa - 12 years of Pylint (or How I learned to stop worrying about bugs) Given the dynamic nature of Python, some bugs tend to creep in our codebases. Innocents NameErrors or hard-to-find bugs with variables used in a closure, but defined in a loop, they all stand no chance in front of Pylint. In this talk, I'll present one of the oldest static analysis tools for Python, with emphasis on what it can do to understand your Python code. Pylint is both a style checker, enforcing PEP 8 rules, as well as a code checker in the vein of pyflakes and the likes, but its true power isn't always obvious to the eye of beholder. It can detect simple bugs such as unused variables and imports, but it can also detect more complicated cases such as invalid arguments passed to functions, it understands the method resolution order of your classes and what special methods aren't implemented correctly. Starting from abstract syntax trees, we'll go through its inference engine and we'll see how Pylint understands the logical flow of your program and what sort of type hinting techniques are used to improve its inference, including PEP 484 type hints. As a bonus, I'll show how it can be used to help you port your long-forgotten library to Python 3, using its new --py3k mode.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
59:05 EuroPython English 2015

Big data beautiful visualization on the browser with Bokeh

Fabio Pliger - Big data beautiful visualization on the browser with Bokeh Bokeh is a Python interactive visualization library for large datasets that natively uses the latest web technologies. Its goal is to provide elegant, concise construction of novel graphics in the style of Protovis/D3, while delivering high-performance interactivity over large data to thin clients. The talk will go through it’s design providing details of the different API layers (bottom to top) concluding with a comprehensive showcase of examples to expose many of the features that make Bokeh so powerful and easy.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
22:32 EuroPython English 2015

MkDocs: Documenting projects with Markdown

Dougal Matthews - MkDocs: Documenting projects with Markdown MkDocs is a Python library for creating documentation with Markdown. The primary goal of the project is to lower the barrier for documentation writers and to help enable high quality prose based documentation. The primary maintainer of MkDocs will cover the following topics: - An introduction to MkDocs and the project goals. - How and why did the project start? - Who uses MkDocs today? - Discuss what we need to do to create great documentation and how MkDocs can help. - A tour of the key features currently in MkDocs - Adding MkDocs to your project. - Using themes in the documentation and making customisations - Publishing your documentation with ReadTheDocs and GitHub pages. - A look at the up and coming features in MkDocs and how you can help make these happen. - A comparison with Sphinx and why you should consider MkDocs.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
34:21 EuroPython English 2015

NumPy: vectorize your brain

Ekaterina Tuzova - NumPy: vectorize your brain NumPy is the fundamental Python package for scientific computing. However, being efficient with NumPy might require slightly changing how you write Python code. I’m going to show you the basic idioms essential for fast numerical computations in Python with NumPy. We'll see why Python loops are slow and why vectorizing these operations with NumPy can often be good. Topics covered in this talk will be array creation, broadcasting, universal functions, aggregations, slicing and indexing. Even if you're not using NumPy you'll benefit from this talk.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
40:46 EuroPython English 2015

Help us build the next edition!

Fabio Pliger/Marc-André Lemburg - EuroPython 2016: Help us build the next edition! We need help with organizing and running EuroPython 2016. In this session, we will explain how the EuroPython workgroup model works and where you could help.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
1:03:52 EuroPython English 2015

Keynote: Towards a more effective, decentralized web

Holger Krekel - Keynote: Towards a more effective, decentralized web Many would like to see more decentralization but what does it mean, really? In this talk, I'll discuss the recent rise of immutable state concepts in languages and network protocols. And how the advent of hash-based data structures and replication strategies are shaking the client/server web service paradigm which rests on managing mutable state through http. By contrast, building on git, bittorrent and other content addressed data structures provides for a more secure, efficient decentralized communication topology. There are projects, thoughts and talk to create new web standards to bring such technologies to mass deployment and fuel a new wave of decentralization. What can Python bring to the table?
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
46:13 EuroPython English 2015

Type Hints for Python 3.5

Guido van Rossum - Type Hints for Python 3.5 PEP 484, "Type Hints", was accepted in time for inclusion in Python 3.5 beta 1. This introduces an optional standard for specifying types in function signatures. This concept was previously discussed as "optional static typing" and I similar to the way TypeScript adds optional type declarations to JavaScript. In this talk I will discuss the motivation for this work and show the key elements of the DSL for describing types (which, by the way is backward compatible with Python 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4). Note: *Python will remain a dynamically typed language, and I have no desire to ever make type hints mandatory, even by convention!*
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
38:45 EuroPython English 2015

Getting started with Bokeh / Let's build an interactive data visualization for the web..in Python!

Sarah Bird - Getting started with Bokeh / Let's build an interactive data visualization for the web..in Python! As a web developer, I find myself being asked to make increasing numbers of data visualizations, interactive infographics, and more. d3.js is great, as are many other javascript toolkits that are out there. But if I can write more Python and less JavaScript... well, that makes me happy! Bokeh is a new Python library for interactive visualization. Its origins are in the data science community, but it has a lot to offer web developers. In this mini-tutorial, I'll run through how to build a data visualization in Bokeh and how to hook it into your web application. This will be a real-world example, that was previously built in d3.js. Along the way, I'll provide tips and tricks that I've discovered in my experience including how Bokeh works wonderfully with the iPython notebook which I use to prototype my visualizations, and many data science people use as their native way to explore data. For those of you who already know a little Bokeh, I'll be covering the new "actions framework" that lets you write JS callbacks in your python code so you can do lots of interactions all on the client side.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
31:23 EuroPython English 2015

Python for IT specialists' tasks automation

Gianluca Nieri - Python for IT specialists' tasks automation This talks is about automation and the use of Python scripts to speed up repetitive tasks. It's for developers, sysops, devops, but also any kind of user that want improve his daily routine. I will talk about the use of Python with different tools for different platforms: Keyboard Maestro/Alfred/Hazel on OsX and Synapse/Kupfer/AutoKey on Linux. There will be presented some sample script to give an idea of the potentiality of Python mixed with great tools, and these are some of the topics that I will cover: - text manipulation; - document template management; - clipboard management; - stuff internet activities (url shortening, web scraping, etc.); - list management. - etc.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
37:06 EuroPython English 2015

TDD - the why, the how and the when not

Fabian Kreutz - TDD - the why, the how and the when not TDD is great, we all know that. But why is it so, and under which circumstances is it ineffective or even harmful? In this talk I want to delve into the deeper meaning of testing to derive how to do it best. All of this from the point of view of somebody who has profited but also struggled with testing and TDD. For every experience level from beginner to advanced there is something to learn or ponder.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
40:27 EuroPython English 2015

The hook-based plugin architecture of py.test

Floris Bruynooghe - The hook-based plugin architecture of py.test The hook-based plugin system used by py.test and being made available as a stand alone package allows easy extensibility based on defined extension points which can be implemented using hook functions in the plugins. Plugins can themselves call these hooks as well as define future extension points allowing for a very flexible design. py.test itself uses this plugin system from the ground up with the entire application being implemented by built-in plugins. This architecture has proven powerful and flexible over the years, on both command line tools as well as long running daemons. This talks will describe how the plugin system works and how it deals with passing arguments and return values 1:N hook calls. It will also describe how to design an application consisting entirely of plugins. While not specifically talking about py.test it will also give a solid understanding on how plugins work in py.test.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
59:29 EuroPython English 2015

Keynote: Python now and in the future

Guido van Rossum - Keynote: Python now and in the future This is *your* keynote! I will have some prepared remarks on the state of the Python community and Python's future directions, but first and foremost this will be an interactive Q&A session.
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
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Version

AV-Portal 3.8.0 (dec2fe8b0ce2e718d55d6f23ab68f0b2424a1f3f)