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13:24 Joe Leys, Étienne Ghys, Aurélien Alvarez English 2012

Chaos | Chapter 2 : Vector fields - The lego race

  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Joe Leys, Étienne Ghys, Aurélien Alvarez
  • Language: English
1:35:46 Stanford University English 2013

Cosmology | Lecture 1

(January 14, 2013) Leonard Susskind introduces the study of Cosmology and derives the classical physics formulas that describe our expanding universe.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: Stanford University
  • Language: English
54:23 math.space German 2012

Die Formel Albert Einsteins

  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: math.space
  • Language: German
49:17 math.space German 2012

Johann Jakob Balmer und die Farben

  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: math.space
  • Language: German
29:12 EuroPython English 2014

Non Sequitur: An exploration of Python's random module

Jair Trejo - Non Sequitur: An exploration of Python's random module An exploration of Python's random module for the curious programmer, this talk will give a little background in statistics and pseudorandom number generation, explain the properties of python's choice of pseudorandom generator and explore through visualizations the different distributions provided by the module. ----- # Audience Non mathematical people who wants a better understanding of Python's random module. # Objectives The audience will understand pseudorandom number generators, the properties of Python's Mersenne Twister and the differences and possible use cases between the distributions provided by the `random` module. # The talk I will start by talking about what randomness means and then about how we try to achieve it in computing through pseudorandom number generators (5 min.) I will give a brief overview of pseudorandom number generation techniques, show how their quality can be assessed and finally talk about Python's Mersenne Twister and why it is a fairly good choice. (10 min.) Finally I will talk about how from randomness we can build generators with interesting probability distributions. I'll compare through visualizations thos provided in Python's `random` module and show examples of when they can be useful in real-life. (10 min.)
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
26:31 re:publica English 2014

Black to Grey to Black: Lessons From Two Decades of Online Activism

There's no museum of online activism; its history is told as a series of disconnected events. Without perspective, we are left to guess what will work next, while scrambling to recreate elements of earlier successes. What can we learn from two decades of online protests? What has made these campaigns work where so many others have failed? And how can the bloggers, activists, and others at re:publica take these lessons and apply them to the wild web of today—and tomorrow?
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: re:publica
  • Language: English
41:40 EuroPython English 2017

Overcoming Cognitive Bias

Overcoming Cognitive Bias [EuroPython 2017 - Talk - 2017-07-14 - Anfiteatro 2] [Rimini, Italy] Starting with a brief description of how built-in mechanisms in our brains lead to cognitive bias, the talk will address how a variety of cognitive biases manifest in the Python and tech communities, and how to overcome them
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: EuroPython
  • Language: English
31:19 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2017

5th HLF – Lecture: The Discrete and the Continuous from James Clerk Maxwell to Alan Turing

The dichotomy between discrete and continuous splits algebra from analysis, quantum from classical, information from energy, Leibniz from Newton and Turing from Maxwell. But this separation is illusory: great scientists bridged the gap. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2017
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
49:02 Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation English 2018

6th HLF – Laureate Lectures: The Riemann Hypothesis

Sir Michael Francis Atiyah: "The Riemann Hypothesis" The Riemann Hypothesis is a famous unsolved problem dating from 1859. I will present a simple proof using a radically new approach. It is based on work of von Neumann (1936), Hirzebruch (1954) and Dirac (1928). The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation or any other person or associated institution involved in the making and distribution of the video.
  • Published: 2018
  • Publisher: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation
  • Language: English
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