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1:25:08 Phillies, George English 2012

27 Summary of the Literature

Lecture 27 - Course Summary. George Phillies lectures from his text "Phenomenology of Polymer Solution Dynamics".
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: Phillies, George
  • Language: English
2:22:29 University of Cambridge English 2014

Modern Steel Products (2014) - Corrosion of coated steel: lecture 15

Professor de Cooman builds on the previous lectures in the sequence, this time dealing with the hot-strip mill. The lecture then breaks into a new topic, on the mechanical behaviour of steel, elasticity in particular. This is a part of a course of lectures given at the Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, POSTECH, Republic of Korea.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
1:06:48 University of Cambridge English 2014

Modern Steel Products (2014) - Batch Processing: lecture 14

Professor de Cooman builds on the previous lectures in the sequence, this time dealing with the batch processing of rolled steel sheet, and consequences on properties. This is a part of a course of lectures given at the Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, POSTECH, Republic of Korea.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
1:08:26 University of Cambridge English 2014

Modern Steel Products (2014) - Formable steels: lecture 22

Professor de Cooman takes the topic of formable steels , in particular the TRIP steels and hot-press forming steels. Both the production and metallurgy of the alloys is described. This is a part of a course of lectures given at the Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, POSTECH, Republic of Korea.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
1:12:19 University of Cambridge English 2014

Modern Steel Products (2014) - Major Applications: lecture 24

Professor de Cooman describes some of the major applications of steel in the context of the production technologies and metallurgy of the alloys. This is a part of a course of lectures given at the Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, POSTECH, Republic of Korea.
  • Published: 2014
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
47:00 University of Cambridge English 2012

Physical Metallurgy of Steels - Part 4

A series of 12 lectures on the physical metallurgy of steels by Professor H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia. Part 4 deals with the design of carbide-free bainitic steels.
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
54:46 University of Cambridge English 2012

Physical Metallurgy of Steels - Part 3

A series of 12 lectures on the physical metallurgy of steels by Professor H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia. Part 3 deals with the mechanism of the bainite transformation.
  • Published: 2012
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
1:18:27 University of Cambridge English 2015

Modern Steel Products (2015) - lecture 3

A series of lectures on steels, given by Professor Bruno de Cooman, Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (GIFT), POSTECH, Republic of Korea
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
1:15:48 University of Cambridge English 2015

Modern Steel Products (2015) - lecture 5

A series of lectures on steels, given by Professor Bruno de Cooman, Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (GIFT), POSTECH, Republic of Korea
  • Published: 2015
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
28:48 University of Cambridge English 2013

Flash Bainite Process

A lecture given by Gary Cola, at the Adventures in the Physical Metallurgy of Steels (APMS) conference held in Cambridge University. Presents the enticing story about the very rapid processing of steel to produce bainitic microstructures in milliseconds.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
33:06 University of Cambridge English 2013

High strength and ductile low density steels - Simplex and Kappa

A lecture given by Ivan Gutierrez-Urrutia, at the Adventures in the Physical Metallurgy of Steels (APMS) conference held in Cambridge University. Low-density steels are described. We present an overview of the ongoing activities on low-density steels at MPIE. We have developed two alloy concepts of high strength and ductile lightweight steels, namely, Simplex and Kappa steels. Simplex steels are austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C steels with high Mn (~30 wt.%) and C (~1.2 wt.%) contents. These alloys exhibit exhibits a superior combination of strength and ductility (ultimate tensile strength of 0.9 GPa and elongation to failure of 80%) due to multiple-stage strain hardening. The development of an evolving hierarchical deformation structure consisting of dislocation configurations and twin substructures results in an outstanding permanent strain hardening. The role of the alloying elements on the underlying strain hardening mechanisms will be presented. Kappa steels are austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C steels with high Mn (~30 wt.%), Al (~8.0 wt%) and C (~1.2 wt.%) contents. These light-weight alloys contain high volume fractions of L12-type ordered nanoprecipitates, so-called kappa carbides, conferring not only high strength (ultimate tensile strength of 1.2 GPa) but good ductility as well (elongation to failure of 40%). Multi-scale characterisation of nano-sized kappa carbides by TEM and 3D-APT provides new insights on kappa carbide-dislocation interactions.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
26:27 University of Cambridge English 2013

Voids and 30,000 atoms

A lecture given by Shinji Munetoh, at the Adventures in the Physical Metallurgy of Steels (APMS) conference held in Cambridge University. Uses molecular dynamics simulations to study the role of voids in determining the ductile fracture energy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the ductile fracture behaviour on the austenite and ferrite phases in steel were performed by using the MD cells including the voids due to the precipitates. The number of Fe atoms were around 30,000. Atomic movements were determined by solving Langevin equations with Finnis-Sinclair interatomic force. The tensile test was simulated by expanding the MD cell in one direction at?room temperature. In the case of the perfect crystalline MD cell, the shear fracture was observed in the austenite phase, and the ferrite phase caused the cup and cone fracture. In the case of the MD cell including the voids, the cup and cone fracture?were observed on both austenite and ferrite phases. The ductile fracture energy of austenite phase was the same level to that of?ferrite phase in the perfect crystalline MD cells.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: University of Cambridge
  • Language: English
04:02 Institute of Physics (IOP) English 2013

The system-wide economics of a carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage network: Texas Gulf Coast with pure CO2-EOR flood

This letter compares several bounding cases for understanding the economic viability of capturing large quantities of anthropogenic CO2 from coal-fired power generators within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas electric grid and using it for pure CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the onshore coastal region of Texas along the Gulf of Mexico. All captured CO2 in excess of that needed for EOR is sequestered in saline formations at the same geographic locations as the oil reservoirs but at a different depth. We analyze the extraction of oil from the same set of ten reservoirs within 20- and five-year time frames to describe how the scale of the carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) network changes to meet the rate of CO2 demand for oil recovery. Our analysis shows that there is a negative system-wide net present value (NPV) for all modeled scenarios. The system comes close to breakeven economics when capturing CO2 from three coal-fired power plants to produce oil via CO2-EOR over 20 years and assuming no CO2 emissions penalty. The NPV drops when we consider a larger network to produce oil more quickly (21 coal-fired generators with CO2 capture to produce 80% of the oil within five years). Upon applying a CO2 emissions penalty of 602009/tCO2 to fossil fuel emissions to ensure that coal-fired power plants with CO2 capture remain in baseload operation, the system economics drop significantly. We show near profitability for the cash flow of the EOR operations only; however, this situation requires relatively cheap electricity prices during operation.
  • Published: 2013
  • Publisher: Institute of Physics (IOP)
  • Language: English
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